SSAWW

Job Posting: TT Assistant Professor of Race in American Religion and Culture, Virginia Tech (Deadline 1.29.2018)

Please circulate this announcement for a tenure-track position as Assistant Professor of Race in American Religion and Culture at Virginia Tech.

The Department of Religion and Culture is a highly interdisciplinary unit of the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences; scholars in the department hold terminal degrees in a variety of fields including Religious Studies, Anthropology, American Studies, History, Music, and Literature. Qualified candidates in any humanities or social science discipline with expertise in Race in American Religion and Culture are encouraged to apply.

Complete position information can be found at:
Position Summary:
The Department of Religion and Culture at Virginia Tech announces a search for
an Assistant Professor of Race in American Religion and Culture. The position is
tenure-track and includes teaching a range of courses in the Department of
Religion and Culture. The expected/standard teaching load is two/two (four
courses per academic year). The successful applicant will hold, by the time of
appointment, a Ph.D. in Religious Studies or a related humanities or social
scientific discipline, with an emphasis on race in the United States, will evidence
the ability to teach courses on race in American religion and culture, will
demonstrate current scholarly research activity on race in American religion and
culture, and will have training in and a commitment to interdisciplinary research
and teaching in the area of religion and culture. The position will require
teaching core undergraduate courses in the department. Preference will be
given to candidates who demonstrate scholarly promise, who have
demonstrated teaching excellence, and who evidence the ability to teach
graduate courses in the department and/or in the interdisciplinary ASPECT PhD
program.
Review of applications will begin on January 29, 2018.
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Reminder: Call for Submissions for the 2018 SSAWW Awards (Deadline 1.1.2018)

Reminder: Call for Submissions for the 2018 SSAWW Awards

The Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW) was founded in 2000 in order to promote the study of American women writers through research, teaching, and publication. In support of that mission, the three awards were established in 2011 to honor the work and legacies of the Society’s founding members and to further SSAWW’s goals to broaden knowledge among academics as well as the general public about American women writers, past and present. As we continue preparations for the 2018 SSAWW conference in Denver, this is a reminder of our call for submissions for our 2018 SSAWW Awards:

Lifetime Achievement Award: The Karen Dandurand Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded every three years at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers’ conference to recognize a scholar’s career achievement in the study of American women writers. The award recognizes the individual’s commitment to the field, as demonstrated in his/her teaching, mentoring of students, scholarship, and service. The award is named in honor of Karen Dandurand, who passed away in 2011. She was one of the founding editors of Legacy and was an active member of SSAWW, serving as the Vice President of Development from 2004 to 2009. Nominators should submit a CV and brief (250 to 500 word) letter of support in one PDF file to the Lifetime Achievement Award Chair, Dr. Diane M. Todd, by January 1, 2018; the chair will distribute all nominations to the committee members. Please contact Dr. Todd at toddbucci@rmu.edu and CC the Vice President of Development, Dr. Christopher Varlack, at ssaww.vpdevelopment@gmail.com to submit nominations for this award.

Book Award: The SSAWW Book Award is given every three years at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers’ conference to recognize excellence in the field. The award will recognize the monograph’s significant contributions to scholarship related to American women writers published during the preceding three years before the deadline for submission. Eligible books must have been published between December 2014 and November 2017. Edited collections and not eligible for the award. Nominators should contact the Book Award Chair, Dr. Valeria Gennero, by January 1, 2018, who will provide information about distributing submissions to committee members (those submitting work for the award should contact their presses to have review copies sent to the committee). Please contact Dr. Gennero at valeria.gennero@unibg.it and CC the VP of Development, Dr. Christopher Varlack, at ssaww.vpdevelopment@gmail.com to submit for this award.

Edition Award: The SSAWW Edition Award is given every three years at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers’ conference in order to recognize excellence in the recovery of American women writers. The award recognizes an edition published during the preceding three years before the submission deadline. Eligible books must have been published between December 2014 and November 2017. Both print and digital collections are welcome. Nominators should contact the Edition Award Chair, Dr. Terry Novak, by January 1, 2018, who will provide information about distributing submissions to each of the committee members (those submitting work for the award should contact their presses to have review copies sent to the committee). Please contact Dr. Novak at Terry.Novak@jwu.edu and CC the VP of Development, Dr. Christopher Varlack, at ssaww.vpdevelopment@gmail.com to submit for this award.

CFP: SSAWW at ALA three proposed panels (Deadline: 1.5.2018)

CFP: Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW) Panels

at the American Literature Association Conference

May 24-27, 2018 | Hyatt Regency San Francisco

The Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW) is pleased to invite proposals for the following panels to be held at the 2018 American Literature Association (ALA) Conference in San Francisco, CA. Each panel examines a different interpretation or representation of labor from early American literature to the literature of the twenty-first century.

Please send proposals of no more than five hundred words (for fifteen-minute papers) to the Vice President of Development, Dr. Christopher Allen Varlack (ssaww.vpdevelopment@gmail.com) no later than January 5, 2018 with an expected response no later than January 12, 2018. Note that presenters must be members of the Society for the Study of American Women Writers by January 29, 2018 in order to secure their place on the program. In addition, please indicate any AV equipment needs in your E-mail.


 

“There Are Few [Pieces] about Pregnancy and Childbirth”:

Explorations into the Labor of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Motherhood in American Women’s Writing

In 2000, Julie Tharp and Susan MacCallum-Whitcomb published This Giving Birth: Pregnancy and Childbirth in American Women’s Writing—an edited volume exploring the poetry and prose of writers from Anne Bradstreet to Toni Morrison who gave voice to the experiences and emotions of childbirth far too often silenced or ignored in a society that once saw childbirth as a woman’s central obligation. These essays therefore reflect growing interest in American maternity literature, especially as more and more women writers began to acknowledge the breadth of emotions they encountered, such as “the murderous alternation between bitter resentment and raw-edged nerves, and blissful gratification and tenderness” (Rich, Of Woman Born: Motherhood as Experience and Institution). In stirring conversation regarding labor, it is thus vital to explore representations of pregnancy and childbirth in American women’s writing and the insights such authors reveal into the psycho-social experience of motherhood, from the mid- to late-1700s through the present day. In exploring this subject across genre and across time, this SSAWW panel asks participants to consider any related issues such as motherhood as gender role to the refusal to have children as an expression of identity or as a socio-political act. SSAWW welcomes papers that explore a wide range of texts and authors related to this overarching topic.

 

 

“She Was Becoming Herself and Daily Casting Aside that Fictitious Self”:

Critiques of Domesticity and Servitude in American Women’s Writing

Responding to the constraints of a patriarchal society, American women writers fought not only for a more expansive role in the social and political sectors of American life but also for a more nuanced representation in literature. As a result, texts of the nineteenth century and beyond often challenged the cult of domesticity with works such as Kate Chopin’s The Awakening and Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper” revealing the internal and external struggles of women to explore their social, political, economic, and sexual freedom outside of the home. Such texts ultimately emerged alongside works by women of color, including Harriet Wilson and Marvel Cooke, who sought to challenge the equally limited roles afforded marginalized communities in American society. By studying servitude from slavery to the Bronx slave market and beyond, these authors sought to challenge the racial and economic hierarchy at work while also exploring the many untapped possibilities for women once valued as contributors and leaders in American life. Seeking to examine domestic life, servitude, and the literature that interrogated/challenged these realities, this panel asks its participants to consider the ways in which American women writers probed the limitations of submissive gender roles as well as the journeys of women to hone their voices and forge identities of their own. SSAWW welcomes papers that explore a wide range of texts and authors related to this topic.

 

 

“Female Wage Labor [As] a Key Site of Ideological Contest”:

Agency, Enterprise, and the Labor Force in American Women’s Writing

Rebecca Harding Davis’ 1861 Life in the Iron Mills was ultimately a groundbreaking text of its time not only for its portrayal of “the bleak lives of industrial workers in the mills and factories of the nation” (Gray) but also for its insights into the lives of mill girls, who saw their jobs as vehicles for social, economic, and educational opportunity. Though there has since been a shift in socio-cultural thought, where the restrictive gender norms of the not-so-distant past began to ease and women began to seek new roles among the labor force of American society, women and labor has always been a contested subject in American culture and literature, even in the present day. Texts such as Lori Merish’s 2017 Archives of Labor: Working-Class Women and Literary Culture in the Antebellum United States are, then, important in stirring scholarship on these vital works (and not just those in the United States) by exploring the push for increased agency and visibility among American working women who move beyond notions of sentimental domesticity to forge a room of their own. This SSAWW panel therefore asks participants to consider texts (from feminist and activist literature of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to the many progressive novels, poems, short stories, autobiographies, and plays produced across time) that examine the labor force as a contested but potentially freeing space for American women. SSAWW welcomes papers that explore a wide range of texts and authors related to this overarching topic.

 

Call for Nominations: 2017 Susan Koppelman Award for Best Anthology, Multi-Authored, or Edited Book in Feminist Studies in Popular Culture or American Literature (Deadline 12.31.2017)

2017 Susan Koppelman Award for Best Anthology, Multi-Authored, or Edited Book in Feminist Studies in Popular Culture or American Culture

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS 2017 Susan Koppelman Award for Best Anthology, Multi-Authored or Edited Book in Feminist Studies in Popular or American Culture published in 2017, The award is sponsored by the Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association. The award will be announced at the 2018 PCA National Conference from 28-31 March 2018 in Indianapolis, IN.

Deadline for submissions is 12/31/2017

This award is for feminist editorial work. Is the editorial rationale for the choices clear? Did the editor(s) structure a book competently, imaginatively, cohesively, innovatively, coherently, and responsibly? Is the edited book a creation or a conglomeration? Is the book an important groundbreaking contribution or is it “follow-up” work? Further information about the criteria is available at susanhuddis@hotmail.com.

The Awards will also be posted on the PCA/ACA web site: www.h-net.org/~pcaacca/, on other appropriate websites, and in other media forums. Recipients need not be present at the conference to receive an award. Recipients who choose to attend will receive a $500 travel grant.

Submissions and Nominations Procedures: Books published in 2017 are eligible for consideration for this year’s award. Books may be nominated by publishers or authors & editors of books.

Please send one copy of each nominated book(s) to each of the Award Committee members below:

 

Susan Koppelman, Ph.D.

4375 E. Coronado Ridge Lane

Tucson, Arizona 85739

send questions to susanhuddis@hotmail.com

Reverend Dr. Virginia Bemis

722 King Ridge Drive

Ashland, Ohio 44805

Professor Barry Mehler

Department of History

Caryn Mehler

(one copy to this address for both judges)

216 Rust

Big Rapids, Michigan 49307

Professor Cari M. Carpenter

Chair, Women’s and Gender Studies

West Virginia University

637 Madigan Ave.

Morgantown, West Virginia 26501

Recent Award Winners

  1. Foremothers of the Women’s Spirituality Movement: Elders and Visionariesco-edited by Miriam Robbins Dexter and Vicki Noble. Teneo Press, Amherst, New York. and The Newspaper Warrior: Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins’s Campaign for American Indian Rights, 1864-1891 co-edited by Cari M. Carpenter and Carolyn Sorisio.  University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London.
  1. Graphic Details: Jewish Women’s Confessional Comics in Essays and Interviews ed. Sarah Lightman, McFarland.
  1. Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics eds. Justin S. Vaughn and Lilly J. Goren, University of Kentucky.
  1. Contested Images: Women of Color in Popular Culture.Edited by Alma Garcia. Lanham, Maryland: AltaMira Press.
  1. Treacherous Texts: U. S. Suffrage Literature, 1846-1946. Edited by Mary Chapman and Angela Mills. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press.
  2. Black Venus 2010: They Called Her “Hottentot”.Edited by Deborah Willis. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press.
  1. The Fat Studies Reader. Edited by Esther Rothblum and Sondral Solovay. New York, New York: NYU Press.
  1. Teatro Chicana: A Collective Memoir and Selected Plays.Edited by Laura E. Garcia, Sandra M. Gutierrez, and Felicitas Nuñez. Austin, TX:  University of Texas Press.
  1. After the Revolution: Women Who Transformed Contemporary Art.Edited by Eleanor Heartney, Helaine Posner, Nancy Princenthal, and Sue Scott. New York, New York: Prestel Press.

  1. Daughters of Earth: Feminist Science Fiction in the Twentieth Century. Edited by Justine Larbalestier. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press.

Earlier award winners include:

Dangerous Men and Adventurous Women: Romance Writers on the Appeal of the Romance by Jayne Ann Krentz, Cecilia Reclaimed: Feminist Perspectives on Gender and Music by Judith Tsou, Kate M. Cleary: A Literary Biography with Selected Works edited by Susanne K. George, Feminism and Methodology: Social Science Issues edited by Sandra Harding.

Dr. Susan Koppelman was the first woman to be honored with a life-time achievement award by the American Culture Association Governing Board Award for Outstanding Contributions to American Culture Studies. The Women’s Joint Caucus for the American & Popular Culture Associations established the annual Susan Koppelman Award for Best Anthology, Multi-Authored, or Edited book in Feminist Studies in Popular Culture in her honor. The first award was announced in 1985.

Susan Koppelman is a feminist literary historian and is the editor of ten ground-breaking critical collections of U. S. women’s short stories. In 1972, she edited the first anthology of feminist literary criticism, Images of Women in Fiction: Feminist Perspectives. In 1967 she taught one of the first Women’s Studies courses in the USA.

Job Posting: Multiple Positions–open rank African American Material Culture Studies and/or African American Public Humanities (Review Process begins 12.2.2017)

Job Posting: African American Material Culture Studies and/or African American Public Humanities, University of Delaware

Multiple Positions, Open Rank

We have been approved for multiple positions–open rank, but with a special interest in senior scholars–for a major initiative in African American Material Culture Studies and/or African American Public Humanities.  Joint appointments or single-department appointments are available among the departments participating in this cluster hire, including the Departments of Africana Studies, Art History, English, and History–with established, rich interdisciplinary collaborations possible among and beyond these interconnected scholarly communities.  As you will see from the job ad, we are engaged in a number of innovative and ambitious initiatives, all of which enjoy strong support at all levels of the administration.  This is an opportunity, in other words, to be part of a dynamic community of scholars dedicated to interdisciplinary work and innovative approaches to higher education, at both the undergraduate and the graduate levels. 0

Application portal here: https://apply.interfolio.com/47136


The College of Arts & Sciences at the University of Delaware invites applications for multiple positions–open rank, but with a special interest in senior scholars–for a major initiative in African American Material Culture Studies and/or African American Public Humanities. Joint appointments or single-department appointments are available among the departments participating in this cluster hire, including the Departments of Africana Studies, Art History, English, and History–with established, rich interdisciplinary collaborations possible among and beyond these interconnected scholarly communities. Successful candidates will have a demonstrable commitment to inclusive excellence and diversity–including a readiness to contribute to ongoing efforts to recruit and retain under-represented students and faculty–and will have a strong record of excellence in scholarship and teaching in African American Material Culture and/or Public Humanities Studies, as well as a commitment to contributing to the development of initiatives in these fields at the University of Delaware.

The University of Delaware is home to several interdisciplinary centers and initiatives that have significant administrative and grant support. Particularly important for the positions we seek to fill are the Center for Material Culture Studies and the African American Public Humanities Initiative (AAPHI), an interdisciplinary graduate study project supported by a major NEH Next Generation grant and Luce Foundation funding. We are home as well to the award-winning Colored Conventions Project, a digital humanities initiative that is recovering the archives and mapping the history of the African American state and national convention movement in the nineteenth century. The Special Collections and Museums of the UD Library offer strong collections in African American art, literature, history and culture shared through exhibitions in the library and museums galleries–including the Paul R. Jones Collection of African American Art–and classes. These collections that are made available to all faculty and students upon request for group or individual study, with a dedicated postdoctoral position established to facilitate these efforts for our African American collections. We are also home to one of the world’s top art conservation programs. Through partnerships with the HBCU Library Alliance and the Alliance for HBCU Museums and Galleries, we are introducing HBCU students to careers in art conservation and allied fields while also working to preserve the rich cultural treasures in HBCU’s libraries, archives, and museums. Our Center for the Study of Diversity provides support and a collaborative community for faculty research, community initiatives, university programming, and administrative planning. Through these initiatives and institutional centers and many others, UD researchers and students have opportunities for local, national, and global collaborations and partnerships. Beyond UD, our faculty have access–supported by well-established institutional ties–to important regional archives, including the Winterthur Museum, Gardens & Libraries, Folger Library, Hagley Museum, The Library Company of Philadelphia, and the Smithsonian Institution, among many others.

The University of Delaware is committed at every level to secure, sustain, and support a diverse community to enrich the experience of our faculty and students and to support and extend our academic mission. We are committed to attracting and retaining employees with varying identities and backgrounds, and we strongly encourage applications from scholars from under-represented groups. UD provides equal access to and opportunity in its programs, facilities, and employment without regard to race, color, creed, religion, national origin, gender, age, marital status, disability, public assistance status, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression. A recipient of an NSF ADVANCE Award for racial and gender equity, UD is responsive to the needs of dual career couples,

supports work-life balance through an array of family-friendly policies, and is dedicated to broadening participation in higher education in all areas of university life. The University of Delaware is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer with inclusive excellence and diversity as core values.

Located in scenic Newark, Delaware, within 2 hours of New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C., the University of Delaware is a state-assisted, privately governed institution that enrolls approximately 17,000 undergraduates and 4,000 graduate students.

Applicants should upload a letter of application, a curriculum vitae, and three letters of recommendation to http://apply.interfolio.com/. Application materials should make clear the applicant’s record of excellence in scholarship and teaching as well as the applicant’s commitment to inclusive excellence in professional practice. The review process will begin December 2, but screening will continue until the position is filled. For further information, contact search committee chair Dr. John Ernest at jrernest@udel.edu.

Emily Dickinson International Society Fellowships (Deadline: 1.30.2018)

2018 Dickinson Scholar Award

The Emily Dickinson International Society invites applications for the 2018 Dickinson Scholar Award, which supports new research on Dickinson. The project need not be devoted solely to Dickinson, but her work should be a substantial focus. The award of $2,000 may be used for any expense incurred to advance the project. Applicants must have completed the PhD. To apply for the award, please submit: a cv, a cover letter, a 600-800 word project proposal, a brief bibliography, and a preliminary budget to Michelle Kohler at mkohler@tulane.edu. Deadline for applications is January 30, 2018. Applicants will be notified of final decisions by March 1. For more information, see www.emilydickinsoninternationalsociety.org

 

2018 Emily Dickinson International Society Graduate Student Fellowship

The EDIS announces a fellowship award of $1,000 in support of graduate student scholarship on Emily Dickinson. The project need not be devoted solely to Dickinson, but her work should be a substantial focus. The award may be used for any expense incurred to advance the project. Preference will be given to applicants in the dissertation stage or writing a work aimed at publication. To apply, please send a cv, a cover letter, a 600-800 word project description, a brief bibliography, and contact information for two references to Michelle Kohler at mkohler@tulane.edu. Applications are due by January 30, 2018. Applicants will be notified of final decisions by March 1. For more information, see www.emilydickinsoninternationalsociety.org

New Books: Learning Legacies: Archive to Action through Women’s Cross-Cultural Teaching by Sarah Robbins

Robbins, Sarah Ruffing. Learning Legacies: Archive to Action through Women’s Cross-Cultural Teaching.

University of Michigan Press, 2017.

The book is available in hardback, paper, and digital editions:

Learning Legacies spotlights women writer-educators of the past whose stories can inspire community building today. One chapter highlights work by African American teachers and students from Spelman College. Another revisits settlement house collaborative learning in urban Chicago. Robbins also honors Native women educators’ nurturing models. Overall, Learning Legacies  shows readers women’s leadership in American education and in writing about that vital work.​

Donate to SSAWW’s Graduate Student Travel Fund

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