Recovery Hub for American Women Writers – Virtual Networking/Tech Hours – 2.9.2022 (Join via Zoom)

The Recovery Hub for American Women Writers supports projects recovering the work of women writers by providing digital access to forgotten or neglected texts and/or extending them with network mapping, spatial analysis, multimedia storytelling, innovative contextualization, and the distant reading of massive datasets. 

The Hub’s project team is excited to begin offering tech hours once a month to support networking among those working in digital recovery. The first tech hour will be devoted to conversation about how future events should be organized and what content to discuss. Please join us!

Date: Wednesday, February 9, 2022

Time: 3:30-4:30 CST

Where: Zoom (link will be send with registration)

Register at https://recoveryhub.siue.edu/blog/2022/01/21/recovery-hub-tech-hour-registration/

Short-term Fellowship: Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture, University of Wisconsin-Madison (Deadline: 5.1.2022)

The James P. Danky Fellowships

In honor of Jim Danky’s long service to print culture scholarship, the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture, in conjunction with the Wisconsin Historical Society, is offering two short-term research fellowship awards for 2022-2023. The Danky Fellowships provide $1000 per individual for expenses while conducting research using the collections of the Wisconsin Historical Society (please see details of the collections).

As we are not able to anticipate how the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic will affect access to physical collections or travel during the academic year 2022-2023, we ask that those applying for the fellowship be open to either an in-person or distance research experience. In-person research is the assumed baseline mode, but may have to shift depending on timing and conditions.  

Grant money has traditionally been used for travel to the WHS, costs of copying pertinent archival resources, and living expenses while pursuing research. In the case of a distance research experience, the funds may be used for larger-scale digitization of materials. We invite fellowship recipients to present their work to our community in a format that will be determined in consultation with the recipient.

Preference will be given to:

  • proposals undertaking research in print culture history
  • research likely to lead to publication
  • researchers early in their career
  • researchers from outside Madison

Prior to applying it is strongly suggested that applicants contact the Wisconsin Historical Society (askarchives@wisconsinhistory.org or 608-264-6459) to discuss the relevancy of WHS collections to their projects. We encourage applicants to start this process early since the Wisconsin Historical Society staff may be able to identify potential collections of which you may not otherwise be aware. WHS staff are working at full capacity during the pandemic and will answer questions in as timely a manner as possible.

There is no application form. Applicants must submit the following:

  1. A cover sheet with name, telephone, permanent address and e-mail, current employer/affiliation, title of project, and proposed dates of residency.
  2. A letter of two single-spaced pages maximum describing the project and its relation to specifically cited collections at the society and to previous work on the same theme, and describing the projected outcome of the work, including publication plans. If residents of the Madison area are applying, they must explain their financial need for the stipend.
  3. Curriculum vitae.
  4. Two brief, confidential letters of reference. Graduate students must include their thesis advisor. Letters may be emailed to chpdc@ischool.wisc.edu by recommenders. 

Applications are due by May 1, 2022 for this fellowship cycle. The recipient will be notified by June 1. Please use your last name as the first word of all file names (for example: Name CV.doc) and email materials to: Jonathan Senchyne, Director, Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture: chpdc@ischool.wisc.edu.

CFP: Individual Proposals for ALA 2022 Chicago (Deadline: 1.30.2022)

This is a reminder that individual proposals for the next American Literature Association Conference are due January 30th. Please email them to me at pettyL@rhodes.edu. The conference will take place in person May 26-29, 2022 at the Palmer House in Chicago. More information can be found here:

Feel free to email me with any questions.

I hope to see many of you in Chicago!

Leslie Petty

Director, 2022 ALA Conference

SSAWW – Join us for an online discussion of new film on Nella Larsen’s Passing – TOMORROW – 1.13.2022

We are excited to announce a new date for this event. If you previously registered, you MUST register again to receive the updated meeting invite link.

SSAWW is delighted to announce a new online event – an informal discussion of the new film of Nella Larsen’s novel Passing, which you can find on Netflix. Bring your reactions, ideas, and questions!

We are honored to have Noelle Morrissette leading our discussion. We ask that attendees view the film in advance and join us for an informal discussion over Zoom.

Please register in advance for this Zoom meeting:
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZEkduutrz4jE90WaidyuVuQBGIuk18IAE3i

When: January 13, 2022 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Noelle Morrissette is author of the forthcoming Anne Spencer Between Worlds (U Georgia Press, 2022), James Weldon Johnson’s Modern Soundscapes (U Iowa Press, 2013) and the editor of New Perspectives on James Weldon Johnson’s The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (U Georgia Press, 2017). She is Program Director of African American and African Diaspora Studies and an associate professor of English at the University of North Carolina Greensboro. She has written several essays about Johnson’s cultural and literary milieu for Cambridge and Oxford University Presses, and is the author of the introduction to the Barnes and Noble Classics edition of James Weldon Johnson’s The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man and Other Writings.

CFP: Margaret Fuller Society at ALA 2022 (Deadline: 1.22.2022)

Margaret Fuller Society
American Literature Association 2022 Conference CFPs

Deadline for Submissions: 22 January 2022

Contact: argerj@gmail.com 

The Margaret Fuller Society will sponsor two panels at the 33rd Annual Conference of the American Literature Association, to be held 26–29 May 2022 at The Palmer House Hilton in Chicago.

*****************************

The work of such nineteenth-century female editors as Mary Ann Shadd and Lydia Maria Child, according to Laura F. Klein, typifies “invisible labor”—“a term that has come to encompass the various forms of labor that are literally invisible because they take place out of sight, or economically invisible because they take place away from the marketplace” (“Dimensions of Scale: Invisible Labor, Editorial Work, and the Future of Quantitative Literary Studies” [PMLA 135.1]). In our ALA sessions, we aim to recognize Margaret Fuller’s contributions to the editorial field while expanding explorations of undersung women editors, in the long nineteenth century and up to the present.

For both panels envisioned below, the Fuller Society invites proposals from and collaborations with people not necessarily concerned explicitly with Fuller. A new signature objective of the society, and its recently formed Racial Justice Committee, is to center the work of Black authors, authors of color, and indigenous authors, especially in ways that challenge or transcend Fuller’s own achievements. 

We welcome abstracts on the work of Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Pauline Hopkins, Jane Johnson Schoolcraft, and Ida B. Wells, to name a few possibilities. Furthermore, we would be delighted to partner not only with individuals but also with organizations such as MELUS, RSAP, and other author societies—both in configuring the panels and in organizing a mentoring brunch and/or “Chat with an Editor” session to further foster conversation and collaboration. “Community formation”: this is a power Klein claims for women editors, and it is also, we strongly believe, the proper work of author societies like our own.

Panel 1: Breaking the Editorial Ice: The Work of Women Editors

For our first panel, we wish to refer to Mary Ann Shadd’s awareness that she had “broken the Editorial ice” for “colored women everywhere,” taking seriously Klein’s call to continue surfacing—and studying—the often hard-to-see, yet vitally important, agency and labor of women editors like Shadd, Child, and Fuller. Inspired by Shadd, whose editorial work on the Black abolitionist newspaper that she herself launched would come under erasure, our panel will make prominent the efforts of women editors, especially women editors of color, across the long nineteenth century and beyond. What, we want to ask, are the best methods for studying the print culture and knowledge work produced by women editors? What kinds of stories emerge? How do they, or should they, inform our own practices as scholars and editors? 

All relevant approaches and topics are encouraged—from the material, emotional, and intellectual economies of editorial work; to its capacity for “community formation” and, again in Klein’s words, for “staging . . . alternative, possible world[s]”; to new archival research, and more.

Panel 2: Making and Using Scholarly Editions of Women Writers 

As we anticipate new scholarly editions of Margaret Fuller’s writings (from Library of America and Edinburgh University Press), we recognize that our blind spots surrounding nineteenth-century women editors influence our appreciation for the work of making and using editions of women’s texts. For this second panel, we seek presentations that address questions prompted by the work of textual editing, particularly in digital form—including but not limited to questions of ethics, representation, canonicity, and methodology. As the Fuller Society has traditionally focused its second ALA panel on pedagogy, we will also entertain ideas from teacher-scholars about using scholarly editions in the classroom—especially in ways that make historically marginalized voices accessible to wide readerships and that model creative, reflective reading practices as part of an anti-racist education.

*****************************

Please send 250-word proposals (indicating any AV needs), along with brief biographical statements, to Jana Argersinger, First Vice President, at argerj@gmail.com, by 22 January 2022.For additional conference details, go to http://americanliteratureassociation.org/ala- conferences/ala-annual-conference/. To learn more about the Margaret Fuller Society, visit https://margaretfullersociety.org/.

Job Posting: Assistant Professor at Saint Vincent College (Deadline 2.7.2022)

Assistant Professor of English, Fall 2022

Saint Vincent College invites applications for a faculty position in the English department at the Assistant Professor rank to begin Aug. 2022.

Deadline to apply: Candidates who apply by February 7 will receive full consideration. Applications may be accepted until position is filled.

Qualifications: Ph.D. or M.F.A; teaching experience, record of scholarly or creative work and promise of future achievement.

Duties: This candidate will teach a 3-4 load across literature and writing courses. Though the position’s specialization is open, concentrations in minority literatures, modern British literature, or fiction writing are preferred. College teaching experience is required. Candidates should have an active research or writing agenda that evinces professional development. Candidates should indicate commitment to service to students, department, the core curriculum, and the College mission.

Other duties: This faculty hire should be prepared to mentor students of color and have experience in antiracist teaching. Other duties that are expected of the candidate include departmental and college contributions, such as the Visiting Writers Series, Eulalia Books, Sigma Tau Delta, involvement with student publications such as The Review and Generation Magazine, and create programs and projects in their own area.

To apply: Send a letter of application, curriculum vitae, three letters of recommendation, teaching philosophy, description of research, graduate transcripts and, if available, evidence of teaching effectiveness at the undergraduate level. In the application, candidates should address how the mission of the college will be supported through their teaching and research. All applications should be submitted to our Human Resource Department. Electronic submissions to employment@stvincent.edu are preferred. Otherwise, applications can be sent to:

Director, Human Resources
Saint Vincent College
300 Fraser Purchase Road
Latrobe, PA 15650-2690

Saint Vincent College is a Catholic, Benedictine liberal arts and sciences college of about 1465 undergraduate students and 200 graduate students. It is located about thirty-five miles east of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in a pleasant suburban/rural environment near the foothills of the Laurel Mountains.

Saint Vincent is guided by the spirit of Benedictine monasticism which holds as one of its core values the welcoming of all persons to help form a diverse community of learners united by the common goal of the growth of each individual. In that spirit, the College is committed to building a diversified faculty and staff and encourages applications from traditionally underrepresented groups. All positions require the incumbent to be able to fully embrace the mission and identity of the College as a Catholic, Benedictine liberal arts and sciences institution. Saint Vincent is an equal opportunity employer.

CFP: Catharine Sedgwick Society at ALA (Deadline 1.15.2022)

The Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society solicits proposals for two panels to be presented at the 2022 American Literature Association Conference. The conference will take place May 26-29 at the Palmer House Hilton in Chicago, Illinois. 

Inventing the Novel
Writing to her friend Susan Channing in 1822, newly minted author Catharine Maria Sedgwick reflected on her recently published work A New-England Tale. “I began that little story for a tract,” she told Channing, “but I had no plans, and the story took a turn that seemed to render it quite unsuitable for a tract.” This anecdote suggests that the line between “tract” and “story” was thin, since Sedgwick accidentally transgressed it by way of a simple “turn” in her plot. What is more, Sedgwick herself referred to her long work as “a story” and “a tale” and yet critics of early American literature consistently identify it as her first novel. 


The novel has long been a difficult form to define, particularly in the American context where the proliferation of print media and a longstanding debate over “novel” vs “romance” have shaped literary-historical values. This difficulty has been exacerbated by the novel’s shifting cultural cachet, with early authors abjuring or decrying this generic category that later critics would impose on their work. This proposed panel explores how the novel has been invented and reinvented over the last several hundred years. Rather than tracing a narrative of the novel’s “rise,” we seek papers that examine the novel’s circuitous trajectory through literary and critical history, whether as an aesthetic category, a platform for political action, a site of critical wrangling, or a container for formal innovation. What generic forms, such as letters, sketches, personal narratives, and tracts, preceded, accompanied, or were absorbed into the novel form? How, in turn, did the nineteenth-century novel transform (subsume?) these other types of writing? How did authors and critics come to terms with the protean nature of the novel form? How did they continue–how are we continuing?–to incorporate these early forms into the ongoing invention of the novel in the twentieth and even twenty-first centuries?
This panel celebrates the 200th anniversary of A New-England Tale. The Sedgwick Society welcomes and encourages proposals pertaining to Sedgwick’s era or later periods of American literature that engage with the novel’s circuitous path through the nineteenth century.
Submit proposals of around 250 words to Ashley Reed (akreed@vt.edu) by January 15th.

Care Work in the Texts of Catharine Maria Sedgwick and Her Contemporaries
Depictions of nursing and care are common in early national and antebellum literature, though the status of care workers and the professionalization of their labor shifted enormously during the first hundred years of the republic. The Sedgwick family was famously supported by the care work of Elizabeth Freeman both before and after Freeman sued for her freedom before the Massachusetts state courts. Catharine called Freeman her “second mother” because her own mother, Pamela Dwight Sedgwick, suffered from mental illness and experienced both home care and institutionalization. Depictions of care work–and the important recognition that care is work–suffuse many of Sedgwick’s writings, from regional fiction like Redwood to didactic novellas like Live and Let Live to non-fiction sketches like “Slavery in New England.” 
This panel invites papers on any aspect of care work as discussed or depicted in the literature of the American nineteenth century, including but not limited to:

  • gendered and raced aspects of care and healing
  • professionalization of care 
  • care and/as domestic labor
  • mental illness care
  • disability and care of/by disabled persons
  • care work in the Civil War and other conflicts
  • care work by/for/among enslaved people

Submit proposals of around 250 words to Ashley Reed (akreed@vt.edu) by January 15th.

Job Posting: Assistant Professor of African American and African Diasporic Literatures and Cultures (20th-21st Centuries) beginning Fall 2022

Queens College, City University of New York 

English, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Flushing New York 11367 

Assistant Professor of African American and African Diasporic Literatures and Cultures of the 20th and 21st Centuries (including Afro-Latinx literature) beginning Fall 2022. 

The Department invites applications especially from candidates with interests in the intersections between those fields and feminist/queer/trans/posthuman studies; disability studies; science studies; food studies; eco-criticism and environmental studies; performance studies; indigeneity; Black rhetorical tradition and/or Black cultural rhetorics. 

All candidates with publication and teaching expertise in African American and African Diasporic Literatures and Cultures of the 20th and 21st centuries will be considered. Completed PhD in hand by time of employment.  Also required are a record or clear promise of publication, a record of strong teaching and commitment to teaching a diverse student body,  and a demonstrated commitment to departmental and institutional service.   

Queens College is an urban school with a faculty and student body that reflects the diversity of New York City. We take pride in our pluralistic community and continue to seek excellence through diversity and inclusion. EEO/AA/Vet/Disability Employer. English, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Flushing New York 11367 

CUNY requires that applicants apply online. Upload a cover letter describing related qualifications and experience, CV, and the name and contact information of three (3) professional references at www.cuny.edu: click “Employment,” then “Search job listings,” then “More options to search for CUNY jobs,” then search by Job Opening ID Number (XXX), click on “Apply Now” and follow the instructions.   

Because diversity is an important part of our mission at Queens College, we ask that applicants include a paragraph in the cover letter reflecting on how diversity, equity and inclusion figure into their teaching, research, and/ or community engagement, whether past, present, or future. Some candidates may be asked at a later date to have a writing sample and reference letters submitted. 

SSAWW – Join us for an online discussion of new film on Nella Larsen’s Passing – 1.13.2022 – Rescheduled

We are excited to announce a new date for this event. If you previously registered, you MUST register again to receive the updated meeting invite link.

SSAWW is delighted to announce a new online event – an informal discussion of the new film of Nella Larsen’s novel Passing, which you can find on Netflix. Bring your reactions, ideas, and questions!

We are honored to have Noelle Morrissette leading our discussion. We ask that attendees view the film in advance and join us for an informal discussion over Zoom.

Please register in advance for this Zoom meeting:
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZEkduutrz4jE90WaidyuVuQBGIuk18IAE3i

When: January 13, 2022 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Noelle Morrissette is author of the forthcoming Anne Spencer Between Worlds (U Georgia Press, 2022), James Weldon Johnson’s Modern Soundscapes (U Iowa Press, 2013) and the editor of New Perspectives on James Weldon Johnson’s The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (U Georgia Press, 2017). She is Program Director of African American and African Diaspora Studies and an associate professor of English at the University of North Carolina Greensboro. She has written several essays about Johnson’s cultural and literary milieu for Cambridge and Oxford University Presses, and is the author of the introduction to the Barnes and Noble Classics edition of James Weldon Johnson’s The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man and Other Writings.

Emily Dickinson International Society – Undergraduate Scholarship Award (Deadline: 6.30.2022)

EDIS Undergraduate Scholarship Award [updated 1/22] 

The Emily Dickinson International Society is pleased to sponsor a prize for undergraduate work on Emily Dickinson. Our goal is to encourage, recognize, and publicize outstanding scholarship among undergraduate students.  Students whose work was created for any undergraduate course, and touches on any aspect of Dickinson, are eligible to submit. Since the last time we awarded this prize was 2018, this round we will accept submissions created between 2019 and 2022. 

Papers and projects should be no longer than 15 pages or the equivalent and should include a heading with the student’s name, undergraduate institution, and email address; a title; and a work cited list. We are also happy to receive experiential and experimental work in different media. A panel of Dickinson scholars will review all submissions and provide feedback. The author of selected submissions will receive a small cash prize and can list this national award on their resumés.  In addition, the selected work will be posted on the EDIS website in September and will be noted, either by an interview with the writer, or by publication, in the EDIS Bulletin

Teachers: please encourage your students to submit their work.  

Send it, with a cover page that contains the student’s email and mailing addresses, and a short recommendation or contextualization from the instructor, to Ivy Schweitzer, Professor of English and Creative Writing, Dartmouth College (Ivy.Schweitzer@Dartmouth.edu). The deadline for papers to be submitted is June 30, 2022.