SSAWW

CFP: SSAWW Panel at the College Language Association Convention (Deadline 9.8.17)

CFP: SSAWW Panel at the College Language Association Convention, April 2018

Hosted by DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois

“Rewrit[ing] the American Literary Landscape”: Immigrant American Women Writers across the Diaspora and Tales of Black Metropolitan Life

Overview

In the introduction to her 2002 text, Rereading the Harlem Renaissance, Sharon Lynette Jones, Professor of English at Wright State University, calls attention to the influx of immigrants into the Black metropolis with “blacks from Africa, the Caribbean, and other regions of the United States migrat[ing] to Harlem in search of the American Dream of economic prosperity and equality, often to find that the dream was elusive” (2). Despite being faced with a tense racial climate that limited the social, economic, and political opportunities afforded ethnic minorities, however, the nation’s arriving immigrants fundamentally transformed cities nationwide into epicenters of unprecedented artistic and cultural growth that forever shaped not only the literary landscape but the very notion of what constitutes the American identity. Eager to explore these critical issues in the works of a diverse range of American women writers, the Society for the Study of American Women Writers is pleased to invite proposals for a SSAWW-sponsored panel to be held at the College Language Association Convention in Chicago from April 4 to 7, 2018.

Topics for Consideration

Because of their role in expanding the ethnic diversity of the United States and contributing to the urban artistic revival nationwide, immigrant American women writers across the African diaspora have played a particularly vital role in the American literary and cultural traditions. This panel will therefore ask participants to consider the unique experience of such immigrant women or writers in the city. Presenters, for instance, might explore social, cultural, racial, and political challenges that such women had to overcome in order to survive in a society where women “sometimes faced the triple jeopardy of race, class, and gender oppression” (Jones 2). How did these women not only help “rewrite the American literary landscape” (2) but also paint a fundamentally new picture of American life—one that recognizes the multicultural mosaic emerging in the city, as they share their traditions and cultural backgrounds with the world? Presenters are asked to consider the works of authors including Paule Marshall, Edwidge Danticat, Jamaica Kincaid, and NoViolet Bulawayo to name a few, as they develop proposals for what is sure to be an intellectually-stimulating panel at the 2018 CLA Convention.

The deadline for proposals this year will be September 8, 2017. Please submit a 250- to 500-word abstract and a brief CV (no more than two pages) that includes rank/status (e.g. ABD, Associate Professor, etc.), institutional affiliation (independent scholars are encouraged to submit proposals as well), and past conference presentations. Proposals should be submitted to the SSAWW Vice President of Development, Christopher Allen Varlack, at ssaww.vpdevelopment@gmail.com and note “SSAWW at CLA Proposal” in the E-mail subject line. All proposals should be included as an attachment, preferably as a single PDF document. Confirmation of receipt will be sent within two business days of submission.

While interested participants do not need to be members of SSAWW to submit a proposal for the aforementioned panel, all presenters must be members of SSAWW and the College Language Association by February 1, 2018 in order to participate in this panel. For more information about SSAWW or CLA, please visit ssawwnew.wordpress.com or clascholars.org respectively.

Call for Readers: 2018 SSAWW Awards (Volunteer Deadline: TODAY – Friday 8.18.2017)

Request for Readers for the 2018 SSAWW Awards

Volunteer Deadline: August 18, 2017

The Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW) was founded in 2000 in order to promote the study of American women writers through research, teaching, and publication. In support of that mission, the three awards were established in 2011 to honor the work and legacies of the Society’s founding members and to further SSAWW’s goals to broaden knowledge among academics as well as the general public about American women writers, past and present. As we begin preparations for the 2018 SSAWW conference in Denver, the time has arrived once again to solicit volunteers to read for our 2018 Awards:

– Lifetime Achievement Award: The Karen Dandurand Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded every three years at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers’ conference to recognize a scholar’s career achievement in the study of American women writers. The award recognizes the individual’s commitment to the field, as demonstrated in his/her teaching, mentoring of students, scholarship, and service. The award is named in honor of Karen Dandurand, who passed away in 2011. She was one of the founding editors of Legacy and was an active member of SSAWW, serving as the Vice President of Development from 2004 to 2009. Five readers are needed to evaluate nominations for this award.

– Book Award: The SSAWW Book Award is given every three years at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers’ conference to recognize excellence in the field. The award will recognize the monograph’s significant contributions to scholarship related to American women writers published during the preceding three years before the deadline for submission. Eligible books must have been published between December 2014 and November 2017. Edited collections and not eligible for the award. Three readers will be needed to evaluate nominations for this award.

– Edition Award: The SSAWW Edition Award is given every three years at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers’ conference in order to recognize excellence in the recovery of American women writers. The award recognizes an edition published during the preceding three years before the submission deadline. Eligible books must have been published between December 2014 and November 2017. Both print and digital collections are welcome. Three readers will be needed to evaluate nominations for this award.

Ideally, readers will represent SSAWW’s range of scholars and scholarship and be available to read submissions during a seven-month period between the closing date for the awards: January 1, 2018 and August 4, 2018. Award recipients will be announced at SSAWW’s 2018 conference. Note that readers for awards (including the VP of Development) are not eligible to submit their own work for consideration of a 2018 award in which they are directly involved.

If you are interested in serving as a reader for one of the following awards, please contact the VP of Development, Christopher Allen Varlack, at ssaww.vpdevelopment@gmail.com by August 18, 2017. In the E-mail, please note the award that you would like to read for, your area(s) of specialty,

and academic rank (independent scholars are always welcome to serve). In addition, provide a PDF copy of your CV. If you have any questions, please let him know.

SSAWW Pacific Northwest

UBC is honoured to be hosting the Pacific Northwest chapter of the Society for the Study of American Women Writers’ Fall 2017 meeting on Saturday October 21 (2017).

http://ssaww-pacific-northwest-reading-group.arts.ubc.ca/

This workshop, organized by Dr. Mary Chapman (Department of English, University of British Columbia) will be attended by graduate students and professors from UBC and other universities in the Pacific Northwest.

The SSAWW, one of the oldest feminist literary scholarly associations in North America, has been hosting semi-annual workshops/reading group meetings since the 1980s. Since its founding, regional chapters (Northeast, Southwest, Pacific Northwest) have been established that also meet twice yearly to discuss new scholarship and newly recovered literary works by American women writers. This will be the first time that any of these groups will meet in Canada.

This meeting will be devoted to a discussion of the work of Ella Rhoads Higginson (1862-1940), guided by invited scholar Dr. Laura Laffrado (Western Washington University).

The first prominent literary author from the Pacific Northwest, Higginson has been largely forgotten as a key American writer. At the turn from the nineteenth century into the twentieth century, readers across the continent were introduced to the remote Pacific Northwest region (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, British Columbia, and Alaska) by Higginson’s descriptions of majestic mountains, vast forests, and scenic waters, as well as her explorations of indigenous cultures and culture of the Pacific Northwest. Higginson was celebrated for her award-winning popular fiction, nonfiction, and lyric poetry, which was set to music and performed internationally. She held the distinguished position as the first Poet Laureate of Washington State. Throughout her literary career, Higginson published nearly one thousand works in leading magazines and newspapers, while also writing books, including the novel Mariella, of Out-West(1902) and the nonfiction work Alaska, the Great Country (1908). Higginson’s reputation faded chiefly due to her singular position as a turn-of-the-century writer of the Pacific Northwest, far from other regions and writers at the time.

Thank you to the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and UBC’s Faculty of Arts for their support of this workshop.

Organized by Mary Chapman
Department of English
VancouverBC Canada V6T1Z1

Texas Regional SSAWW Study Group – 10.21.2017

The Fall 2017 meeting of the Texas Regional SSAWW Study Group will take place on October 21, 2017 at University of Texas Austin, hosted by Gretchen Murphy. The common reading will be Rebecca Rush’s Kelroy, edited by Betsy Klimasmith (Broadview, 2016) and Dr. Klimasmith will be a special guest participant.

RSVP by September 22 to gretchen@austin.utexas.edu — and please indicate whether you will stay for dinner.

Information regarding the schedule, location, lodging, parking, etc. is available on our website: http://txssaww.wordpress.com/

The Study Group is an informal gathering of professors, graduate students, and independent scholars who share an interest in American women’s writing. We share a lunch (provided by the host campus), spend the afternoon discussing the common reading, and have dinner at a local restaurant (paid individually). We welcome new participants to join the conversation, which is always rich and stimulating, and often touches on larger professional concerns (teaching, publishing, mentoring, etc.).

CFP for C19 Seminar: Feminist Critical Regionalism and the Climate of Western Literary Studies (Deadline 9.15.2017)

Feminist Critical Regionalism and the Climate of Western Literary Studies

Seminar Leaders: Jennifer S. Tuttle and Jean Pfaelzer

The C19 conference is again offering seminars that emphasize conversation and interactive dialogue as an alternative to traditional paper and roundtable formats. Seminars will provide participants the opportunity to have a collaborative conversation around a particular topic. Seminars will be capped at 15 participants and will be run by co-facilitators with expertise in the topic. Each participant will submit a five-page position paper before the conference to be read in advance by the other participants so that seminar time can be reserved for discussion. Seminar participants will be listed in the program.

Seminars will convene for two hours at the conference. Confirmed participants will pre-circulate 5-page papers to fellow seminar members in advance of the seminar. The due date for the 5-page papers will be Thursday, March 8, 2018, two weeks before the conference commences.

To apply for a seminar, submit a title and an abstract (not to exceed 250 words) of the 5-page paper you propose to pre-circulate to the seminar. Members of the Program Committee and the relevant seminar leaders will select participants from these proposals. Please note: you do not need to submit the 5-page paper itself when applying to the conference.

The submission deadline for seminar applications is September 15, 2017. To apply, please visit c19conference2018.exordo.com/.


This seminar takes up Krista Comer’s call to advance feminist critical regionalism in studies of the US West, a region invoked here as a material and discursive construct. Recent scholarship by Susan Kollin, Neil Campbell, Chadwick Allen, José Limón, and others on the shifting signifier of the West has powerfully reconceptualized the region as fluidly postwestern, boundlessly rhizomatic, globally trans-indigenous, and deeply local. These reframings of the field are vital, yet Comer observes that “we grapple still as critics” with neglected feminist and decolonial concerns regarding the politics of space, mobility, and flow—“with the fact of immobilities, uneven development, frictions. Who moves when, [and] under what conditions?” (p. 9). This seminar invites papers that use the conference theme of “climate” in innovative ways to navigate paradoxes of mobility and space in intersectional feminist studies of the US West.

How, for example, might reconceiving the West as a wind-blown zone of circulation, stasis, transfer, and exchange within the larger Pacific world recover and resituate women’s agency, further illuminate queer and gender-innovative creative expression in and about the region, and provide interpretive access to the lives and voices of women heretofore overlooked in 19th-century western literary studies, especially indigenous, African American, Chinese American, Chicana, Latina, LGBTQ, and working-class women? Polar Easterlies and equatorial Trade Winds blow from east to west across North America and the Pacific; in the latitudes between them, Westerlies follow a reverse course, roaring from west to east. On the crests of these winds and in their zones of convergence, concurrent and competing agendas have been pursued. As metaphors these winds may inspire new ways of approaching women’s lives and texts in the West of the long 19th century–as a gateway to and a space within the imperial Pacific; a nexus of human trafficking and trade; a site of captivity, exclusion, and transgression; an oceanic zone of Native survivance; or an unmoving, persistent Aztlán. Participants may work within the metaphor of wind or consider other approaches to illuminating western women’s cultural production, but we especially encourage those who engage with the theme of climate.

(Krista Comer, “Thinking Otherwise across Global Wests: Issues of Mobility and Feminist Critical Regionalism,” Occasion: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities, vol. 10, 2016. http://arcade.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/article_pdfs/Occasion_v10_comer_final.pdf).

Jennifer S. Tuttle is Dorothy M. Healy Professor of Literature and Health at the University of New England, where she directs the Maine Women Writers Collection and co-founded the Women’s and Gender Studies program; in 2017 she completed a term as editor of Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers. She is editor of the first recovered edition of Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s 1911 western The Crux (2002) and co-editor of Charlotte Perkins Gilman: New Texts, New Contexts (2011, with Carol Farley Kessler) and The Selected Letters of Charlotte Perkins Gilman (2009, with Denise D. Knight). Her published essays on Gilman, María Amparo Ruiz de Burton, and Owen Wister explore intersections among gender, medical discourse, and western literary studies. She is currently working on a book about American nervousness in women’s writing of California and the imperial Pacific.

Jean Pfaelzer is Professor of English, Asian Studies, and Women and Gender Studies at the University of Delaware. She is the author of California Bound: The History of Slavery in the American West (2018); Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans (2007); Parlor Radical: Rebecca Harding Davis & the Origins of American Social Realism (1996); and The Utopian Novel in America (1984) and editor of The Rebecca Harding Davis Reader (1995)Among her forthcoming books is Muted Mutinies: Slave Revolts on Chinese Coolie Ships. Jean recently helped to curate I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story for the Smithsonian Museum of American HistoryShe appears in two PBS specials airing this year: “1882” and a PBS/CCBS special on Chinese immigration. In 2015 she was featured on CSPAN3’s “African American Slavery and the Underground Railroad in California.”

CFP: Catherine O’Flaherty Chopin’s Irish Eyes Panel co-sponsored by the Kate Chopin International Society (Deadline 10.6.2017)

Call for Papers: Catherine O’Flaherty Chopin’s Irish Eyes

Panel co-sponsored by the Kate Chopin International Society,

Transatlantic Women 3 Conference: Women of the Green Atlantic

Dublin, Ireland Royal Irish Academy

21-22 June 2018

Before we knew her as Kate Chopin, the author of The Awakening was christened Catherine O’Flaherty by her parents, Eliza Faris and Thomas O’Flaherty, the latter of whom emigrated to America from County Galway, Ireland. Given that O’Flaherty died when Chopin was very young, that Chopin was raised by maternal relatives of French descent, that she grew up in a city originally part of the Louisiana territory and named after a French Catholic saint, and that she married into a French family, much of Chopin scholarship has focused on French and French-American influences in her life and fiction. However, around the time Chopin was born in 1850, nearly 10,000 Irish emigrated to St. Louis in yet a second wave of nineteenth-century Irish immigration to America. The neighborhood of Kerry Patch developed to the city’s north, and parish churches such as St. Patrick’s, St. Bridget of Erin, and St. Lawrence O’Toole served a growing Irish population. When she died in 1904, Chopin lived on a street with an Irish surname: McPherson Avenue.

In keeping with the Transatlantic Women 3 conference theme, this panel invites papers that consider “Irish/American crosscurrents of the long nineteenth century” that might have influenced Chopin’s view of the world. How might we theorize the degree to which Ireland’s legacy—both in Europe and America—influenced the fiction Chopin bequeathed to us?  Papers may address any topic related to Chopin as part of “the Irish-American nexus,” including but not limited to: Irish history in St. Louis; Chopin’s Irish relatives, friends, and contacts; or Irish characters in her fiction.

Please send abstracts of 250 words to Bonnie Shaker, bshaker@kent.edu, on or before 6 October 2017. Conference details may be found in the Transatlantic Women 3 link, above.

SSAWW Pacific Northwest

UBC is honoured to be hosting the Pacific Northwest chapter of the Society for the Study of American Women Writers’ Fall 2017 meeting on Saturday October 21 (2017).

http://ssaww-pacific-northwest-reading-group.arts.ubc.ca/

This workshop, organized by Dr. Mary Chapman (Department of English, University of British Columbia) will be attended by graduate students and professors from UBC and other universities in the Pacific Northwest.

The SSAWW, one of the oldest feminist literary scholarly associations in North America, has been hosting semi-annual workshops/reading group meetings since the 1980s. Since its founding, regional chapters (Northeast, Southwest, Pacific Northwest) have been established that also meet twice yearly to discuss new scholarship and newly recovered literary works by American women writers. This will be the first time that any of these groups will meet in Canada.

This meeting will be devoted to a discussion of the work of Ella Rhoads Higginson (1862-1940), guided by invited scholar Dr. Laura Laffrado (Western Washington University).

The first prominent literary author from the Pacific Northwest, Higginson has been largely forgotten as a key American writer. At the turn from the nineteenth century into the twentieth century, readers across the continent were introduced to the remote Pacific Northwest region (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, British Columbia, and Alaska) by Higginson’s descriptions of majestic mountains, vast forests, and scenic waters, as well as her explorations of indigenous cultures and culture of the Pacific Northwest. Higginson was celebrated for her award-winning popular fiction, nonfiction, and lyric poetry, which was set to music and performed internationally. She held the distinguished position as the first Poet Laureate of Washington State. Throughout her literary career, Higginson published nearly one thousand works in leading magazines and newspapers, while also writing books, including the novel Mariella, of Out-West(1902) and the nonfiction work Alaska, the Great Country (1908). Higginson’s reputation faded chiefly due to her singular position as a turn-of-the-century writer of the Pacific Northwest, far from other regions and writers at the time.

Thank you to the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and UBC’s Faculty of Arts for their support of this workshop.

Organized by Mary Chapman
Department of English
VancouverBC Canada V6T1Z1

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