SSAWW

Deadline (9/1): “Gender and the Cultural Preoccupations of the American West” (Studies in the Novel)

Call For Papers – Studies in the Novel

Special Issue: “Gender and the Cultural Preoccupations of the American West” 

Deadline for submissions: 9/1/2016

 

Studies in the Novel is currently seeking submissions for a special issue on “Gender and the Cultural Preoccupations of the American West,” guest edited by Sigrid Anderson Cordell (University of Michigan) and Carrie Johnston (Bucknell University), which will be published in fall 2017.

 

This special issue examines the novel as a tool of political engagement through which women writers have challenged prevalent notions of the American West as masculine, antimodern, and untouched. Even thirty years after Annette Kolodny’s foundational study The Land Before Her, recent work by Nina Baym and Krista Comer has shown there is considerable work to be done to account for women writers’ engagement with the West as an imaginative and political space. Likewise, new directions in gender studies, border theory, settler colonialism, and critical regionalism have made new conversations about the Western as a literary genre increasingly urgent.

 

We invite contributions that examine the ways that women novelists have located themselves in the West—both imaginatively and geographically—asking how these narratives have engaged cultural “preoccupations” with the West as an extension of the predominantly white, masculine public sphere. Examining these narratives, contributors will also evaluate gendered representations of the longstanding contested nature of the “occupation” of western territories and, more recently, US borders.

 

Possible topics include:

  • Women’s writing and borderlands
  • Gender and settler colonialism
  • Intersections of post-feminism, the post-western, and the post-racial
  • Novels about the West as spaces for debate
  • New readings of canonical western women writers like Willa Cather and Mary Austin
  • Ways that the critical landscape shifts by paying attention to neglected texts
  • New readings of under-read women writers
  • Women writers and the post-West or post-regionalism
  • Globalization and the novel
  • Visualities in women’s novels about the West
  • The Western novel as a gendered genre
  • The gendering of anthropology in narratives about the West

 

Submissions should be sent in MS Word, devoid of personal identifying information. Manuscripts should be 8,000-10,000 words in length, inclusive of endnotes and Works Cited, have standard formatting (1” margins, double-spaced throughout, etc.), and conform to the latest edition of the MLA Style Manual. Endnotes should be as brief and as limited in number as possible. Illustrations may accompany articles; high-resolution digital files (JPEGs preferred) must be provided upon article acceptance. All copyright permissions must be obtained by the author prior to publication.

 

Questions and submissions should be sent to studiesinthenovel@unt.edu.

The deadline for submissions is September 1, 2016.

CFP: Gender Studies in the Library

Gender Studies in the Library: Case Studies, Programming, Outreach

Book Publisher: McFarland

Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Library’s Role in Supporting Financial Literacy for Patrons (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016); public library administrator, special, school librarian.

Lura Sanborn, co-editor. Women, Work, and the Web, contributor, (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015); public, academic, school librarian.

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty, sharing practical know-how about what works for Women/ Men/LGBTIQ to meet patron gender information. Chapters sought useful to public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty: proven, creative, case studies, how-to chapters based on experience to help colleagues with innovative workshops, outreach, grants, resources.

Topics could include but are not limited to: getting boys to use the library; showcasing GBLTIQ voices; programming, successful examples, intentions and outcomes; acquisitions, to support, showcase, represent; wage gaps; women’s studies librarianship. No previously published, simultaneously submitted material. One, two, or three authors per chapter; each chapter by the same author(s). Compensation: one complimentary copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many co-authors or if one or two chapters: author discount on more.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapters each described in a few sentences by September 20, 2016, brief bio on each author; place GEN, Your Name on subject line: smallwood.carol@gmail.com

CFP: Catharine Sedgwick Society Symposium 2017 (Deadline 11.30.16)

“Where and When: Evolving Concepts of Place, Space, and Time

in the Writings of Sedgwick and Her Contemporaries”

Commemorating the 150th Anniversary of Sedgwick’s death in 1867

and The 20th Anniversary of the Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society

June 7-10, 2017 — The Red Lion Inn, Stockbridge, Massachusetts

From her first novel, A New-England Tale; or Sketches of New-England Character and Manners (1822) to her last, Married or Single? (1857), much of Catharine Sedgwick’s writing, like the writing of many of her contemporaries, is geographically and historically specific. While a significant body of criticism has treated the elements of history and locality in Sedgwick’s works, far less scholarship has explored the ways in which her depictions of settings reflect changing ideas about both place and time over the course of her career. How did Sedgwick’s understanding of her native Berkshires, the larger region of New England, and the nation as a whole evolve as her physical and personal life, her professional career, and the United States advanced and matured? How did her perception of the passage of time, of cultural change, and of history itself evolve as political expansion, economic development, and technological innovation rapidly changed the look, the breadth, and the pace of American life from the 1820s to the Civil War?

Commemorating the 150th anniversary of Sedgwick’s death and the 20th anniversary of the founding of the Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society, the Society will return to Sedgwick’s home town of Stockbridge, Massachusetts, to convene its 8th symposium from June 7-10, 2017. The Society invites proposals that consider Sedgwick’s legacy—how it grew over the course of her career and how it has evolved in the century and a half since her death—as well as the work of Sedgwick (or one of her male or female contemporaries with links to Sedgwick) through the lenses of place, space, and time broadly construed—including studies of setting and historicity as well as more contemporary theoretical approaches to time, space, and the environment. Papers might:

  • Explore evolving ways of reading/representing the landscape in works by Sedgwick and her contemporaries
  • Make connections between new technological developments, such as railroads and telegraphs, and changing perceptions of space and time in literature
  • Explore the state of the union as reflected in evolving depictions of place
  • Discuss the role of historic sites, cemeteries, place names in fiction and in national identity
  • Rethink the “transcendental” movement in terms of space and time
  • Elucidate cultural histories or popular culture representations of iconic New England scenes, such as the Concord Bridge, Ice Glen, Sacrifice Rock/Laurel Hill, Mount Holyoke, or Monument Mountain
  • Envision new roles for Sedgwick’s works in the classroom or interpret ways in which the teaching of Sedgwick and her contemporaries has evolved over nearly fifty years of recovery scholarship
  • Demonstrate ways in which digital humanities and online archives impact scholarly research on Sedgwick and her contemporaries
  • Theorize changing perceptions of domestic life, familial relationships, and the meaning of “home”: how might the “domestic” be reframed in terms of space, place and time?
  • Focus on the material distribution of texts (letters, periodicals, transatlantic republishing) in Sedgwick’s time and how these distribution methods relate to space, place and time
  • Explore ways in which considerations of geographic and/or historic specificity support, reiterate, and/or challenge larger theoretical notions of geography and/or history
  • Elucidate the life cycle or developmental paradigm of nonhuman entities:  plants, landscapes, mountains, art, nations, communities
  • Construct or deconstruct conceptual boundaries and binaries, such as country/city; past/present; colony/metropole; village/nation
  • Demonstrate how places that are geographically distant become connected through narrative
  • Describe ways in which concepts of space, place and/or time are constrained or distorted by gender, race, age, ethnicity or other factors
  • Track a specific place or moment in time across a variety of texts by different writers
  • Examine indirect experiences of geographic places or historic moments through the use of art, storytelling, monuments, news, or other forms of representation

These are among the many possibilities—as usual, all Sedgwick-related topics are welcome!

Please e-mail proposals of approximately 200-400 words by November 30, 2016, to Lisa West, CMSS Second Vice-President for Programs:   lisa.west@drake.edu

To register for the symposium or get more information about the conference program or outings in the Stockbridge area, visit the CMSS website at http://cmsedgwicksociety.org

Assistant or Associate Professor of American Studies (USC)

Job Posting Details:  http://jobs.usc.edu:80/postings/71540

SSAWW Spring 2016 Newsletter now available

The Spring 2016 SSAWW Newsletter is available here:

SSAWW 17-1 Spring 2016

Please welcome our new officers as of July 31, 2016:

Officers 

  • President: DoVeanna S. Fulton, University of Houston-Downtown, fultond@uhd.edu (single term) (term ends 2018).
  • Vice President of Organizational Matters: Sabrina Starnaman, University of Texas at Dallas
  • Leslie Allison, Temple University leslie.allison@temple.edu (single term; 2017) (supporting Conference Director)
  • Rickie-Ann Legleitner, Black Hills State University rickie.legleitner@bhsu.edu (single term; 2017) (supporting Associate Conference Director)
  • Vice President of Membership and Finances: Magda Garcia, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Vice President of Development: Christopher Varlack, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
  • Vice President of Publications—Leslie Allison, Temple University leslie.allison@temple.edu
  • Jordan L. Von Cannon, Louisiana State University jvonca1@lsu.edu (single term; 2017) (supporting VP for Publications)

New Books: Selected Poems of Edna St. Vincent Millay: An Annotated Edition. Edited by Timothy F. Jackson, with an Introduction by Holly Peppe

millaySelected Poems of Edna St. Vincent Millay: An Annotated Edition
Edited by Timothy F. Jackson, with an Introduction by Holly Peppe

Yale University Press, 2016.

http://yalebooks.com/book/9780300213966/selected-poems-edna-st-vincent-millay

In this authoritative volume, Timothy F. Jackson has compiled and annotated a new selection that represents the full range of her published work alongside previously unpublished manuscript excerpts, poems, prose, and correspondence. The poems, appearing as they were printed in their first editions, are complemented by Jackson’s extensive, illuminating notes, which draw on archival sources and help situate her work in its historical and literary context. Two introductory essays—one by Jackson and the other by Millay’s literary executor, Holly Peppe—also help critically frame the poet’s work.

New Books: Native Women and Land: Narratives of Dispossession and Resurgence by Stephanie J. Fitzgerald

nativeNative Women and Land: Narratives of Dispossession and Resurgence.
Stephanie J. Fitzgerald

Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2015
http://www.unmpress.com/books.php?ID=20000000005449

Winner of the 2015 Woodcraft Circle Honor and Award for Best Academic Book and just recently, the Beatrice Medicine Award for Scholarship in American Indian Studies (awarded by the Native American Literature Symposium).

Donate to SSAWW’s Graduate Student Travel Fund

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