CFP: Collection on Playwright Lydia Diamond, Due December 16, 2016




Staging Lydia: Dramaturgy, Directing & Design in the Plays of Lydia Diamond

Edited by Denise J. Hart

(Northwestern Press 2018)


Staging Lydia is an anthology that seeks to contextualize the work of notable seasoned African American woman playwright Lydia Diamond for a broader academic and professional audience. This anthology will include chapters from both scholars and professional theatre practitioners. It will serve as a resource in institutions and spaces that serve undergraduate students and professional

practitioners seeking a comprehensive examination of the works of Lydia Diamond.


Written and edited by theatre scholar, educator and dramaturge Denise J. Hart, Staging Lydia positions the work of Lydia Diamond as an important African American playwright making a significant contribution to the diversification of the American Theatre canon. The volume will include an in-depth interview with Diamond and key collaborators who’ve impacted her playwriting career.  Northwestern Press will release he volume in 2018.


Diamond is the author of 6 published plays and the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships. In addition to being produced in regional theatre houses, her play Stick Fly was produced on Broadway by Alicia Keys in 2012 under the direction of Kenny Leon.


 Breakdown of Manuscript

Foreword by Kathy Perkins

Introduction by the editor, Denise J. Hart

12 chapters (essays) ranging from 5000 to 6000 words in length

8-10 practitioner interviews for a chapter on collaborators who have worked on Diamond’s plays


Essay Topics

The anthology will examine Diamond’s work through the lens of dramaturgy, directing and design. Authors are encouraged to form essay topics that spring from their specific interest in and relationship to Diamond’s work.



Authors are invited to submit an abstract, due no later than December 16, 2016

Each proposal submission must be in Microsoft Word format and include: title of paper; abstract (250 words maximum),

author’s affiliation(s) and email address.  Email your submission to:


Editor –  Denise J. Hart

Denise J. Hart, a tenured Associate Professor of Theatre at Howard University. Hart is a prolific playwright, dramaturge and

educator.  For the past 16 years she has served the academic population at Howard University where she founded the Playwrights-in- Process Visiting Playwrights series and where she was instrumental in the development of Obie Award Winning playwright, Nikkole Salter’s ground breaking play, “Repairing a Nation” and through a partnership with the Lark Play Development Center, she assisted with the play development and translation from French to English of award winning French playwright, Kofi Kwahule’s “Melancholy of Barbarians.”


Hart is also a founding charter member of the August Wilson Society, housed at Howard University. She is an active member of professional theatre organizations, including: American Society of Theatre Research, Dramatist Guild, Black Theatre Network, SAG, Literary Managers and Dramaturges of the Americas, Association of Theatre in Higher Education and serves as the Secretary of the board for the Black Theatre Alliance of ATHE


SUBMISSION DEADLINE: December 16, 2016   Email to

CFP for ALA 2017: Emily Dickinson International Society, Due Jan 4, 2017

Calls for Papers

Emily Dickinson International Society



The Emily Dickinson International Society will sponsor two sessions at the 2017 American Literature Association Annual Conference. ALA conference will be held in Boston, May 25-28, 2017. Please send a 300-word abstract and a brief CV to Michelle Kohler ( and Renee Bergland ( by January 4, 2017.


Panel 1: Dickinson and Violence

We welcome papers that consider the significance of violence within Dickinson’s corpus. For example, papers might offer new approaches to Dickinson’s poetic treatment of war violence, slavery, criminality, natural disaster, violence toward or among animals, theodicy, racial or gendered violence, as well as more metaphorical forms of violence, to language, paper, syntax, decorum, etc.


Panel 2: Emily Dickinson, Open Topic

We invite papers on any aspect of Dickinson’s poems and letters, including multi-disciplinary or multi-author.

CFP for ALA 2017: Pauline E. Hopkins Society Due January 6, 2017

Please consider submitting a proposal for one of the two panels (including one on editors) below.  Ellen Gruber Garvey has kindly agreed to act as respondent for the first panel.  Thank you.

Call for Papers

Pauline E. Hopkins Society

American Literature Association

28th Annual Conference

May 25-28, 2017

Boston, MA


The Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins Society will sponsor two sessions at the 28th Annual Conference of the American Literature Association.


Panel One: Pauline Hopkins and Other Editors

Pauline Hopkins’s work as an author has, to a certain degree, overshadowed her work as an influential editor at The Colored American Magazine and later at the short-lived New Era Magazine.  Yet, as Hanna Wallinger has pointed out, her position at the Colored American “put Hopkins at the center of crucial debates about the cultural politics of magazine editing, the cultural politics of radical activism, and the early feminist movement.” This panel welcomes papers that address any aspect of Hopkins’s work as a magazine editor, particularly in relation with other editors at the Colored American (such as Walter Wallace and Fred R. Moore), the New Era, or other periodicals.  Papers on her relationships to her contemporaries, such as T. Thomas Fortune of The New York Age or the editors of mainstream publications aimed at white readers, and also later editors, such as W.E.B. Du Bois and Jessie Fauset of The Crisis, are particularly welcome.


Questions to consider might include: How did Hopkins wield her influence as editor in the pages of the magazine and behind the scenes?  What is the relationship between Hopkins as author and Hopkins as editor?  How is editing linked to issues of gender and/or race?  How do these issues influence or drive Hopkins’s role as editor in relation to other editors?  How is editing related to what Wallinger has called “the cultural politics of radical activism” in Hopkins’s work and that of other editors?


Ellen Gruber Garvey, author of Writing With Scissors: American Scrapbooks from the Civil War to the Harlem Renaissance (Oxford 2013), and The Adman in the Parlor: Magazines and the Gendering of Consumer Culture (Oxford UP 1996), is scheduled to serve as respondent to this panel.  We ask that full drafts of papers be available by May 8th.


Panel Two: Open panel on any topic related to Pauline Hopkins’s life and work.

Especially welcome are papers on approaches to teaching Hopkins and her work.


Instructions for proposal submission:

  • Abstracts for both panels should be no more than 300 words and accompanied by a brief CV.
  • Proposals for both panels should be sent to Eurie Dahn, Program Committee Chair, at by January 6, 2017.
  • The subject line of the email should be “Hopkins/ALA panel one (or two).”
  • AV needs should be included in the proposal.
  • Membership in the Pauline E. HopkinsSociety is required of presenters.

CFP: Migration, Diaspora, Circulation and Translation: due Feb 15, 2017

Migration, Diaspora, Circulation and Translation

October 5-7, 2017

University College Dublin, Clinton Institute for American Studies

Dublin, Ireland

A conference sponsored by the Charles Brockden Brown Society (

Our conference site in Dublin calls to mind issues of migration, immigration, emigration, colonization, revolution, and other changes that result from the movement of people, ideas, and things from one place to another. Such issues were significant in colonial and early national American writing and thought in the long eighteenth century. The current global migration crisis and the recent “Brexit” vote makes these topics timely for reappraisal: as millions of migrants and asylum seekers cross into Europe, the world confronts questions about borders, resources, community, poverty, wealth, understanding of cultural differences, and human rights. The Eleventh Biennial Conference of the Charles Brockden Brown Society invites papers on all aspects of diaspora, migration, circulation, and translation in the long eighteenth century. The following list offers some examples of suggested topics:

  • ●  Texts (letters, periodicals, books, treatises) that migrate from one place to another
  • ●  Migration of species, and theories of natural history that involve migration or hibernation
  • ●  Spread of genetic material in plants or other living beings; ecological biology, biodiversity,

    monoculture or related concepts

  • ●  Movement of food, drink and other cultural practices related to agriculture, food preparation

    and/or eating

  • ●  Loss inherent in places from which migration takes place on a large scale
  • ●  Changing boundaries of nations, places, concepts (gender, childhood, etc.) during the long eighteenth century
  • ●  Colonial and/or imperial repercussions of migration
  • ●  Representations of Irishness as an unstable category in the long eighteenth century
  • ●  Maria Edgeworth’s influence on American texts
  • ●  Literary hoaxes and their reliance on dissemination
  • ●  Ways that “contagion” works differently than “diaspora” as a trope
  • ●  Adaptations, literary influences, allusions, plagiarism, copyright issues
  • ●  Charles Brockden Brown’s depiction of migration, circulation, translation
  • ●  Migratory labor, including prisoners, apprentices, and chattel slaves
  • ●  The effects of borders and border crossing in domestic (national and private) spaces

    Although we are an author society, we solicit proposals from a broad range of texts and practices beyond those associated with Brown and his writings alone. We also encourage interdisciplinary scholarship and work emphasizing non-U.S. literatures. Our conference culture aims to create a space of egalitarian consideration free from career-oriented and competitive attitudes, a place for new work to blossom. In this light, we have no concurrent sessions, so that all may be heard by all. Because of time/space constraints, we may ask you to reframe your proposed talk as a brief (5-10 minute) presentation for inclusion within a roundtable format.

    Travel Support for Graduate Students:

    Two travel awards of $500 each for graduate student participation will be awarded, funded by the Brown Society. Criteria for these travel subventions will favor students at the dissertation stage (over those in earlier stages of degree work) and those who have not previously presented at a CBBS meeting. Graduate students applying for a subvention should indicate their interest in a cover letter and provide information about whether or not they are ABD.

    250-word proposal deadline: February 15, 2017. Please send a proposal in .docx format to

CFP: Volume on Edith Wharton, due Nov 20, 2016

Call for Papers: Critical Insights, Edith Wharton

Please see below the call for essays for a forthcoming volume on Edith Wharton. The volume is part of the series Critical Insights (Salem Press) and will appear in fall 2017. More information can be found here:


Following the guidelines for the series, I seek essays (4000-5000 words) that are accessible to high school students and undergraduates, and are meant to:

  • Provide undergraduates with a comprehensive introduction to the author’s works, as well as the various approaches students are likely to encounter and study in their classrooms.
  • Help students build a foundation for studying works in greater depth by introducing them to key concepts, contexts, critical approaches, and vocabulary in literary scholarship.

The format of each volume is standard, and will include:

  • A “biographical” essay (2000 words) that gives an overview of Wharton’s life
  • A “historical background” essay (4000-5000 words) that addresses how the time period influenced Wharton as well as what makes her work relevant to a modern audience. The essay should consider a variety of contexts in which Wharton’s work is usually placed.
  • A “critical reception” essay (4000-5000 words) that reviews the history of critical responses to Wharton’s oeuvre, and addresses the major concerns that scholars have identified over the years. The essay should be a comprehensive overview of criticism rather than a focused analysis of specific perspectives.
  • A “critical lens” essay (4000-5000 words) that offers a close reading of Wharton’s work(s) from a particular critical standpoint (e.g. gender studies, cultural studies, disability studies, etc).
  • A “comparative analysis” essay (4000-5000 words) that analyzes Wharton in the light of another (similar or contemporary) author.


In addition: the volume will include ten 5000-word essays, which will offer various critical readings of Wharton’s work. Topics could address (but are not limited to):

  • Wharton and the First World War; Wharton and race; Wharton and feminism; queer readings of Wharton’s works; Wharton and cosmopolitanism; Wharton and modernism; Wharton as an architectural historian; Wharton’s works in comparison with other writers (American or not); Wharton in a transatlantic context; Wharton and animal studies; Wharton and disability; Wharton and other genres (e.g. Gothic); Wharton in film; Wharton as a travel writer, etc.
  • I welcome topics that reflect the main critical approaches to Wharton’s oeuvre, as well as recent reevaluations of her work. Essays that incorporate a range of Wharton’s texts are strongly encouraged. Readings and approaches should not be dated nor so cutting-edge as to be dated in the next 10 years.


Please send an abstract (500-1000 words) and a brief CV by November 20, 2016 to:


Myrto Drizou, PhD

Department of English

Valdosta State University

Valdosta GA 31698


Notification of acceptance by December 15, 2016. Complete first drafts (5000 words) due by March 15, 2017.

CFP: James Fenimore Cooper and American Women Writers, Due Jan 15, 2017

The James Fenimore Cooper Society will host the following panel at the 28th annual American Literature Association conference, which will take place from May 25-28, 2017, in Boston, MA.

Panel 1: James Fenimore Cooper and American Women Writers

Contributing to a literary marketplace largely shaped by Cooper’s success as a professional writer, American women writers from the 19th century to the present have been strongly influenced by or have consciously responded to Cooper’s novels, themes, and generic innovations. This panel will consider the ways women writers – from Cooper’s contemporaries, such as Catharine Maria Sedgwick (Hope Leslie) to current writers, such as Lauren Groff (The Ghosts of Templeton) –have been shaped by Cooper, his novels, and/or his literary contributions. Papers may consider the ways Cooper was influenced by female contemporaries as well. Please submit to a 250-word abstract, a brief cv (2-3 pages), and an indication of whether or not the paper may be published in the James Fenimore Cooper Society Journal by January 15, 2017. Please also indicate any audio-visual requirements. All proposals should be both pasted into the text of the email and included as attachments (word files or pdfs preferred).

Please submit abstracts and accompanying materials to Luis A. Iglesias ( by January 15, 2017.

Papers should be a maximum of 20 minutes (6-8 pages) in length. Brief discussion will follow the presentations. Presenters need not be members of the James Fenimore Cooper Society, though we certainly hope they will choose to join. Please note that as per ALA guidelines, no one may present more than one paper at the conference.

Papers presented at the conference will, with their authors’ permission, be published in the James Fenimore Cooper Society Journal and made available online at the Cooper Society website. Papers may be mildly revised for publication.


CFP: ALA Symposium, Regionalism and Place (Deadline 5.15.17)

Call for Papers

American Literature Association Symposium

September 7-9, 2017

Hotel Monteleone, New Orleans, Louisiana

Regionalism and Place in American Literature

American regional writing, as a literary movement, often has a limited association with a few decades during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. At times, many writers have cringed at being described as “regional,” fearing limiting or marginalizing classification. Other writers have embraced the term.  However, more recent research has often argued for a renewed importance in regional scholarship or the scholarship of place and has redefined how we look at canonical definitions of regionalism and place.  This symposium seeks to deepen our understanding of the importance of regionalism and place in past and present American literature by continuing to question spatial boundaries and definitions.  Are regions confined to big patches of landscape or can cities and neighborhoods be regional?  How do we address or define more recent regional concepts like the “Postsouthern” or “Postwestern”?  What does regionalism look like in the 21st century and how does it define (or fail to define) our sense of place?  What is it to publish or write “regionally”?  We welcome paper proposals, panels and roundtable discussions on all aspects of regionalism and place within American literature and particularly encourage interdisciplinary papers and projects.

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Michael Steiner, Emeritus Professor of American Studies, California State University, Fullerton

One page proposals or panel suggestions can be sent to program director Dr. Sara Kosiba at by May 15th, 2017.

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