2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference – Theme and Call

SSAWW 2021 Conference November 4-7, 2021

Royal Sonesta Harbor Court Hotel, Baltimore, Maryland

View the full CFP and submission details HERE – View the call for SSAWW Awards HERE – Deadline 2.1.2021

American Women Writers: Ecologies, Survival, Change

“Ecologies, Survival, Change” celebrates the many women across the Americas whose creative work fosters survival and envisions change by exploring the systems in which we live, labor and love. Toni Morrison is our touchstone: her works powerfully remind us that humans, however implicated in damaging structures, can also resist them through networks that sustain and transform.

We offer the term “ecologies” to signify the dynamic, interlocking systems that make up our world, from networks of family and friends to entrenched processes of environmental exploitation to hierarchies of race and gender.  Material and discursive, natural and human created, entrenched and emergent – ecologies integrate diverse, even conflicting, values and effects.  As the novel coronavirus demonstrates, global pandemics and other crises make many ecologies hyper-visible, calling attention to the sustenance which some provide while exacerbating the destructiveness of others.  

Our conference embraces the capacity of creative work to represent existing ecologies and to imagine alternative ones. While we encourage papers, panels, roundtables, and workshops that explore our theme, however, our 2021 conference is not restricted to them. As always, we encourage panel proposals from affiliated societies. As we meet in Baltimore for the first time, we also welcome contributions that highlight the city’s women writers and artists, organizers and organizations.

In the spirit of creating ecologies that sustain us, the 2021 conference will offer numerous opportunities for community-building and personal and professional flourishing: workshops, mentoring, and brainstorming sessions for colleagues at all stages, from graduate students to retirees; opportunities for meditation and exercise; meetings with journal editors; roundtables and discussions about distance teaching and learning. We will also unveil the SSAWW Digital Recovery Hub, a network of scholars grounded in diverse feminist methods which provides resources for digital project consultation and technical assistance for scholars engaged in the recovery work of American women writers.

While we’re planning a face-to-face conference for November 2021, we are monitoring the ongoing situation with COVID-19 and will prepare contingencies as the situation continues to evolve

Proposals for panels, roundtables, and individual papers are to be submitted no later than February 1, 2021.  Details on proposal submissions will be forthcoming.  Please check our website and the SSAWW listserv for future updates on our 2021 Triennial Conference.

CFP: 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference (Deadline: 2.1.2021)

CFP: 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference “American Women Writers: Ecologies, Survival, Change”

November 4-7th, 2021 Baltimore, Maryland

For the 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference in Baltimore, we invite proposals on the topic of “American Women Writers: Ecologies, Survival, Change.”

Proposals are welcome on subjects from early American literature to the literature of the present. Proposals might engage with these topics but are not limited to them:

I. Studies of Writing that

  • Examines the systems in which we live, labor, and love
  • Fosters survival and envisions change
  • Illuminates crises that make the ecologies that constitute our worlds visible or hyper-visible
  • Represents existing ecologies and imagines alternative ecologies
  • Brings together metaphors of disease, national peril, and anti-immigration, especially 19th and 21st century writing by women
  • Resists nativist discourses of contagion and national peril, especially 19th- and 21st century by immigrant women
  • Represents systemic barriers to social justice and routes to achieving it
    • Envisions intersectionality as forms of ecology
    • Exposes systemic gender inequities
    • Connects racism and racial and gender bias to physical and cultural health issues
  • Highlights memoir and letters as expressions of relationships between individual lives
  • Explores the role of writing in emotional recovery from systemic oppression and/or illness
  • Addresses women’s engagement with ecologies of print culture and beyond: periodicals, newspapers, magazines, pamphlets, books, the internet, etc.
    • Opposes epistemicide
    • Explores ecologies of the archive: what is accessible, sustained, recreated, generated, perpetuated, and/or perpetrated in archival and recovery processes; where do women writers live, survive, and thrive?

II. Proposals on Teaching and Pedagogy that

  • explore the ecologies of academic institutions and the role of women scholars within (and against) them)
  • address literary canons as ecologies and propose healthier, more diverse ecologies of literature and literary study
  • model ways to by-pass anachronistic approaches and create new lenses for student research/scholarly production, etc.
  • move beyond academic monocultures by engaging the intersections of art, music, literature, etc. for a more interdisciplinary approach
  • examine the predominant methodologies of discrete historical eras and their presence in the work of women writers and artists

III. Public Humanities

  • Performance
  • Scholarship as social engagement
  • Teaching outside of the academic classroom
  • Creating partnerships for public humanities by bridging the university and the public sphere

IV. Pedagogies and Scholarship in the Digital Era

  • Surviving and thriving pedagogically in the digital era
  • Teaching via distanced learning
  • Using digital tools, assignments, and projects in the classroom
  • Adapting to the move to online curricula
  • Showcasing research projects and student work in digital modes
  • Devising models of resistance, politics, and economic compensation in the digital age
  • Shepherding projects from initial idea stage to fully-formed digital works

V. Digital Humanities

  • Building and sustaining DH projects from grant funding to long-term sustainability
  • Creating networks for digital projects beyond the university
  • Developing the relationship between recovery work and digital platforms
  • Making it count: how to construct a digital portfolio for research and promotion

VI. Professional Development

  • Professional challenges within universities or the discipline (e.g., how to “count” digital work toward promotion and tenure, reconsidering the value of edited volumes, etc.)
  • From PhD candidate to colleague: demystifying the academic job market
  • The non-academic job search and the role of humanities outside th academy
  • From proposal and beyond: understanding academic publishing in the twenty-first century

Please send your submissions as PDFs to ssaww.conferences@gmail.com

Deadline: February 1, 2021

Individual paper proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative paper title as well as a proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words.

Pre-formed panel proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative panel title and contact information for the session chair. In addition, we will need a tentative title and a brief proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words for each participant. Note that panels typically consist of three, but no more than four, presenters who are each allotted between fifteen and twenty minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

Pre-formed roundtable proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative roundtable title and the contact information for the session chair. In addition, we will need a title and brief proposal of approximately 150 to 250 words for each participant. Note that roundtables typically consist of five to six participants allocated around six to eight minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

Workshop and exhibition proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative session title as well as a brief workshop/exhibition overview of approximately 150 to 250 words. There is an optional section devoted to additional session information to provide space and time considerations, contact information for additional contributors, etc.

Special sessions (for SSAWW affiliate organizations): SSAWW affiliate organizations will be asked to provide a tentative panel title and contact information of the session chair. In addition, we will need a tentative title and a brief proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words for each participant. Note that panels typically consist of three presenters allotted fifteen to twenty minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

For any special sessions (such as a syllabus/assignment exchange, film screening, etc.) that does not follow this format, please contact Dr. Ellen Gruber Garvey directly at ssaww.conferences@gmail.com with a query.

For complete sessions, please ensure that notifications are sent to potential participants by early January at the latest to allow those whose proposals are not accepted for the panel or roundtable to submit individual paper proposals by the submission deadline of February 1, 2021. Chairs will be asked to provide an abstract for the panel as a whole (approximately 250 to 300 words) as well as the contact information and a brief biographical statement (no longer than 60 words) for each participant, each individual abstract, and any A/V requirements (please note that while we do recognize the need for support for some presentations, there are always high costs associated with securing this equipment that we would like to limit).

Participants are allowed to appear on the final program no more than twice in an effort to allow as many individuals as possible the opportunity to participate. Participants will be listed in the program if they are presenting a paper, participating in a roundtable or workshop, or serving as the chair for a session. Participating in two different roles in the same session (e.g., as the chair and a panelist) would therefore count as two listings in the program. Please note that it is not permissible to present on two panels, though individuals can present as part of a panel and a roundtable session.

For help regarding any technical issues with submitting proposals or questions about the participation guidelines, please contact Dr. Sara Kosiba, Conference Associate for the 2021 conference, at ssaww.conferences@gmail.com; she is also the contact person for scheduling, A/V requests, etc.

For questions regarding the conference itself, please contact the Vice President of Organizational Matters, Dr. Maria Sanchez via E-mail at ssaww.vporganizationalmatters@gmail.com

Note that selected participants must be members of SSAWW no later than April 1, 2021 in order to secure their place on the conference program.

We look forward to receiving proposals for the many thoughtful and informative sessions that our SSAWW members always produce and to seeing you in Baltimore for yet another powerful SSAWW Triennial Conference.

For conference updates and additional information about the Society for the Study of American Women Writers, please visit the 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference tab on our main menu

Call for Graduate Students – Year in Conferences: MLA 2021 (Deadline: 11.25.2020)

Calling graduate student writers for “The Year in Conferences: MLA 2021″:

ESQ: A Journal of Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture is seeking participants to cover the Modern Language Association virtual convention from January 7-10 for its annual “The Year in Conferences” feature.

The MLA team will cover panels of interest to ESQ‘s readers.  This project is an excellent opportunity for scholarly collaboration and professionalization. YiC has been recognized by scholars not just for its utility but also as a mentoring and networking tool. From the initial recruiting stages to panel selection and publication of the final piece, YiC creates a supportive, collaborative environment that encourages participants to do their best work.  Past YiC writers have found the experience very rewarding.

We seek a team of Ph.D. students working in nineteenth-century American literature.  If you are interested in participating, please send a C.V. and brief message describing your scholarly interests to LuElla D’Amico at ldamico@uiwtx.edu by November 25, 2020

CFP: Mattie Griffith Antebellum Antislavery for SSAWW 2021 (Deadline: 12.20.2020)

For the forthcoming SSAWW 2021 conference, we are assembling a panel centered on antebellum antislavery novelist and poet Mattie Griffith.  Papers for this panel can consider any facet of Griffith’s literary and activist work, or contextualize Griffith within U.S. women’s or Kentucky abolitionist writing.  Current panelists’ papers center on Griffith’s examinations of reading and activism in Griffith’s novel Madge Vertner, and on her abolitionist poetry.

If interested in submitting a paper for consideration on this panel, please submit a 50 word biography and a 250 word paper proposal (and also address any and all queries and questions) to Holly Kent at hkent3@uis.edu by Sunday, December 20th.

Reminder: Panel Discussion Mid-Century Maine Women Writers – Tonight, 5:00-7:00 pm

The Maine Women Writers Collection at the University of New England, along with our partner, the University of Maine Augusta, invites you to attend a panel discussion on Mid-Century Maine Women Writers. This event is part of a project at the University of Maine at Augusta, “Maine’s Mid-Century Moment,” which is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Held in honor of Maine’s 2020 bicentennial, “Mid-Century Maine Women Writers” is one of several events around the state that highlight a variety of the makers who helped define Maine for the nation in the middle of the 20th century.


When: Friday, November 6, 2020, 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Where: Online: Register for the webinar here, and you will receive a link the day before the event, or watch the livestream at www.une.edu/live.
Free and open to all.

Highlighting the work of three Maine women writers, this panel will explore how these women’s writing engaged with Maine as place and with the social constructs of the mid-Century period.

Panelists and Topics

Ellen Taylor will present on Elizabeth Coatsworth, a best-selling children’s book writer, poet, novelist, and essayist on rural Maine living. Very popular during her lifetime, she won the Newbery award for her children’s book The Cat Who Went to Heaven (1930) and wrote over ninety books between 1910 and 1976. Taylor will discuss her archival findings in the Maine Women Writers Collection as they relate to Coatsworth’s travels in the Far East and their influence in writing her celebrated children’s book.

Joseph Conforti will discuss Mary Ellen Chase, who was born and raised in Maine. The author of over thirty books, she wrote a great deal of Maine-based fiction, including the bestselling novel Windswept (1941). In a 1936 interview in the Portland Sunday Telegram, Chase declared that she wrote “largely because I want to acquaint others with the background of Maine life, with the splendid character of Maine people, and with the unsurpassed loveliness of Maine fields, shores, and sea.”

Lisa Botshon will give a talk entitled “Katharine Butler Hathaway: The Queer Modernism of The Little Locksmith.” The first excerpt of Katharine Butler Hathaway’s enduring 1943 memoir The Little Locksmith was published in the Atlantic Monthly in 1942. The account of the ways in which this diminutive woman, who had been indelibly marked by spinal tuberculosis as a child, was able to liberate herself from conservative ideas about female autonomy, sexuality, and art through the purchase of a house in Castine, Maine, resonated with readers worldwide. This talk will consider how her memoir demonstrates that radical modernist ideas can be created in the rural reaches of Maine through, in part, building upon earlier iterations of queer New England women’s culture.

Presenters Lisa Botshon, Professor of English, University of Maine at Augusta Joseph Conforti, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, University of Southern Maine Ellen Taylor, Professor of English, University of Maine at Augusta Jennifer S. Tuttle, Dorothy M. Healy Professor of Literature and Health and Director of the Maine Women Writers Collection, UNE (moderator)

FMI: contact Cathleen Miller, Acting Curator, MWWC, cmiller10@une.edu

Call for Applications: MA in English Research Assistantship (Deadline: 12.5.2020)

M.A. in English Research Assistantship at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in Willa Cather Studies

Please pass this information along to seniors or recent graduates who may be interested!

The Willa Cather Project and the Willa Cather Archive are pleased to offer one Research Assistantship to an incoming MA student in English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln each year. This assistantship provides students with full funding for two years–stipend, benefits, and tuition remission—at the same level as other funded M.A. students in the department. Those selected will be welcomed to the collaborative research team behind the digital humanities project, the Willa Cather Archive. Recently, the team has been creating a scholarly edition, The Complete Letters of Willa Cather, and work on this project will continue into at least 2022. The student may also be assigned to duties in support of the work of the Cather Project, which produces the Willa Cather Scholarly Edition and Cather Studies and supports research and teaching on Cather.

The successful applicant will have a demonstrated interest in the life and work of Willa Cather and/or a closely related field, such as early twentieth century women’s writing, LGBTQ literature, or Western American literature. No prior experience is necessary as extensive training and mentoring will be provided, but we welcome applicants with experience in digital humanities, textual studies, and historical research. Applicants who wish to be considered for this Research Assistantship in Willa Cather Studies should indicate their interest in their application statement for the M.A. in English. You can find more information about the UNL graduate program in English here. Applications are due December 5th.

Please address questions about these grants to Professor Melissa J. Homestead, Director of the Cather Project (mhomestead2@unl.edu).

Job Posting: TT Assistant Professor in New Southern Studies (Deadline: 12.4.2020)

Position in New Southern Studies

Wofford College’s Department of English Language and Literature seeks applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor in New Southern Studies with a subfield in one of the following: Critical Race Theory, Afro-Latinx Studies, Native American and Indigenous Studies, Queer Souths, Afro-diasporic, Black Feminism, or Black Cinema/Media Studies. We are particularly interested in applicants whose pedagogy and scholarship show a commitment to diversity, equity, and justice. 

Applicants will have a Ph.D. in American Literature, American Studies, or related field by the start of the appointment in the fall of 2021 and provide evidence of excellence in teaching and scholarship. The incoming faculty member will teach courses of their own design, such as a first-year Humanities seminar and introductory and advanced courses for English majors in New Southern Studies. The teaching load is 3-0-3 in the first year and 3-1-3 in the following years. Wofford faculty are teacher-scholars with a focus on undergraduate teaching and advising and a commitment to the liberal arts. We welcome applicants who participate in relevant field work, activism, and equity projects, collaborate with colleagues across disciplines, and strengthen campus and community ties through community-based learning.

We ask applicants to provide a cover letter, CV, graduate transcript (an unofficial transcript is fine for the initial application), and a statement that describes how their approach to teaching and scholarship would contribute to the college’s goal of creating a richly diverse and welcoming educational environment. Please send application material to EnglishSearch@wofford.edu. Questions about the position can be directed to Dr. John Ware at warejm@wofford.edu .

Applications received by Dec. 4 will receive full consideration.  References, a writing sample, and other material may be requested at a later point in the application process. The first round of interviews will be conducted via Zoom and on-campus visits will take place only if national/local public health guidelines and college policies allow.

WOFFORD COLLEGE

Established in 1854, Wofford College is a four-year, residential liberal arts college located in Spartanburg, SC With a student body of 1,770 undergraduates and 27 major fields of study, it is recognized nationally for its robust academic program, outstanding faculty, study abroad participation, and successful graduates. Wofford is home to one of the nation’s 283 Phi Beta Kappa chapters; the community also enjoys Greek Life and 19 NCAA Division I athletic teams. Wofford’s priorities increasingly reflect commitments to diversity, inclusivity and coalition building. Created spring of 2015, the President’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee has executed the recommendations of Wofford’s 2014 Strategic Vision Plan: to increase the diversity of students, faculty and staff, to support programming and policy geared toward equity, and to link its investment in diversity to sustainable partnerships with the Spartanburg community. Working alongside Wofford’s Center for Community-Based Learning, the Committee has helped Wofford restructure campus leadership, develop diversity training for faculty and staff, increase geographic, racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and LGBTQQIA representation, and increase funding for diversity-related programming. 

SPARTANBURG, SC

Spartanburg is located in upstate South Carolina, 30 miles east of Greenville, SC, an hour from Charlotte, NC, and three hours east of Atlanta, GA. Historic Charleston and the South Carolina coast are three hours away, and Wofford sits an hour south of the artistic, culinary hub of Asheville, NC. Spartanburg is a growing, diverse community that supports six college and university campuses along with numerous civic arts and cultural associations. It became the first city in South Carolina to join the Government Alliance on Race and Equity and, in 2012, became one of five cities nationally to participate in the ten-year Wellville program, a national nonprofit initiative dedicated to improving equitable wellbeing in US cities. Spartanburg and Wofford partner on multiple community equity initiatives, including the Northside Project, which has brought together a diverse group of citizens to revitalize a neighborhood in ways that don’t reproduce the harm of earlier urban renewal programs.

EEO STATEMENT 

Wofford College values diversity within our students, faculty, and staff, and strives to recruit, develop, and retain the most talented people. Wofford College does not discriminate in employment on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, sex, sexual orientation, transgender status, gender identity, age, national origin, disability, veteran status, or any other legally protected status in accordance with applicable federal, state and/or local laws. 

It is the policy of Wofford College to provide reasonable accommodations for qualified individuals with disabilities for employment. If you require an accommodation to participate in any part of the hiring process, please reach out to HumanResources@Wofford.edu.

COMPLIANCE WITH TITLE IX 

In compliance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Wofford College does not discriminate against any employee, applicant for employment, student, or applicant for admission on the basis of sex. Policies and procedures for addressing complaints of discrimination and harassment can be found at www.wofford.edu/titleix. Reports can be made to the Title IX Coordinator at any time using the contact information below. Inquiries related to the application of Title IX at Wofford should be referred to the college’s Title IX coordinator: 

CFP: 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference (Deadline: 2.1.2021)

CFP: 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference “American Women Writers: Ecologies, Survival, Change”

November 4-7th, 2021 Baltimore, Maryland

For the 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference in Baltimore, we invite proposals on the topic of “American Women Writers: Ecologies, Survival, Change.”

Proposals are welcome on subjects from early American literature to the literature of the present. Proposals might engage with these topics but are not limited to them:

I. Studies of Writing that

  • Examines the systems in which we live, labor, and love
  • Fosters survival and envisions change
  • Illuminates crises that make the ecologies that constitute our worlds visible or hyper-visible
  • Represents existing ecologies and imagines alternative ecologies
  • Brings together metaphors of disease, national peril, and anti-immigration, especially 19th and 21st century writing by women
  • Resists nativist discourses of contagion and national peril, especially 19th- and 21st century by immigrant women
  • Represents systemic barriers to social justice and routes to achieving it
    • Envisions intersectionality as forms of ecology
    • Exposes systemic gender inequities
    • Connects racism and racial and gender bias to physical and cultural health issues
  • Highlights memoir and letters as expressions of relationships between individual lives
  • Explores the role of writing in emotional recovery from systemic oppression and/or illness
  • Addresses women’s engagement with ecologies of print culture and beyond: periodicals, newspapers, magazines, pamphlets, books, the internet, etc.
    • Opposes epistemicide
    • Explores ecologies of the archive: what is accessible, sustained, recreated, generated, perpetuated, and/or perpetrated in archival and recovery processes; where do women writers live, survive, and thrive?

II. Proposals on Teaching and Pedagogy that

  • explore the ecologies of academic institutions and the role of women scholars within (and against) them)
  • address literary canons as ecologies and propose healthier, more diverse ecologies of literature and literary study
  • model ways to by-pass anachronistic approaches and create new lenses for student research/scholarly production, etc.
  • move beyond academic monocultures by engaging the intersections of art, music, literature, etc. for a more interdisciplinary approach
  • examine the predominant methodologies of discrete historical eras and their presence in the work of women writers and artists

III. Public Humanities

  • Performance
  • Scholarship as social engagement
  • Teaching outside of the academic classroom
  • Creating partnerships for public humanities by bridging the university and the public sphere

IV. Pedagogies and Scholarship in the Digital Era

  • Surviving and thriving pedagogically in the digital era
  • Teaching via distanced learning
  • Using digital tools, assignments, and projects in the classroom
  • Adapting to the move to online curricula
  • Showcasing research projects and student work in digital modes
  • Devising models of resistance, politics, and economic compensation in the digital age
  • Shepherding projects from initial idea stage to fully-formed digital works

V. Digital Humanities

  • Building and sustaining DH projects from grant funding to long-term sustainability
  • Creating networks for digital projects beyond the university
  • Developing the relationship between recovery work and digital platforms
  • Making it count: how to construct a digital portfolio for research and promotion

VI. Professional Development

  • Professional challenges within universities or the discipline (e.g., how to “count” digital work toward promotion and tenure, reconsidering the value of edited volumes, etc.)
  • From PhD candidate to colleague: demystifying the academic job market
  • The non-academic job search and the role of humanities outside th academy
  • From proposal and beyond: understanding academic publishing in the twenty-first century

Please send your submissions as PDFs to ssaww.conferences@gmail.com

Deadline: February 1, 2021

Individual paper proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative paper title as well as a proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words.

Pre-formed panel proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative panel title and contact information for the session chair. In addition, we will need a tentative title and a brief proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words for each participant. Note that panels typically consist of three, but no more than four, presenters who are each allotted between fifteen and twenty minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

Pre-formed roundtable proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative roundtable title and the contact information for the session chair. In addition, we will need a title and brief proposal of approximately 150 to 250 words for each participant. Note that roundtables typically consist of five to six participants allocated around six to eight minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

Workshop and exhibition proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative session title as well as a brief workshop/exhibition overview of approximately 150 to 250 words. There is an optional section devoted to additional session information to provide space and time considerations, contact information for additional contributors, etc.

Special sessions (for SSAWW affiliate organizations): SSAWW affiliate organizations will be asked to provide a tentative panel title and contact information of the session chair. In addition, we will need a tentative title and a brief proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words for each participant. Note that panels typically consist of three presenters allotted fifteen to twenty minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

For any special sessions (such as a syllabus/assignment exchange, film screening, etc.) that does not follow this format, please contact Dr. Ellen Gruber Garvey directly at ssaww.conferences@gmail.com with a query.

For complete sessions, please ensure that notifications are sent to potential participants by early January at the latest to allow those whose proposals are not accepted for the panel or roundtable to submit individual paper proposals by the submission deadline of February 1, 2021. Chairs will be asked to provide an abstract for the panel as a whole (approximately 250 to 300 words) as well as the contact information and a brief biographical statement (no longer than 60 words) for each participant, each individual abstract, and any A/V requirements (please note that while we do recognize the need for support for some presentations, there are always high costs associated with securing this equipment that we would like to limit).

Participants are allowed to appear on the final program no more than twice in an effort to allow as many individuals as possible the opportunity to participate. Participants will be listed in the program if they are presenting a paper, participating in a roundtable or workshop, or serving as the chair for a session. Participating in two different roles in the same session (e.g., as the chair and a panelist) would therefore count as two listings in the program. Please note that it is not permissible to present on two panels, though individuals can present as part of a panel and a roundtable session.

For help regarding any technical issues with submitting proposals or questions about the participation guidelines, please contact Dr. Sara Kosiba, Conference Associate for the 2021 conference, at ssaww.conferences@gmail.com; she is also the contact person for scheduling, A/V requests, etc.

For questions regarding the conference itself, please contact the Vice President of Organizational Matters, Dr. Maria Sanchez via E-mail at ssaww.vporganizationalmatters@gmail.com

Note that selected participants must be members of SSAWW no later than April 1, 2021 in order to secure their place on the conference program.

We look forward to receiving proposals for the many thoughtful and informative sessions that our SSAWW members always produce and to seeing you in Baltimore for yet another powerful SSAWW Triennial Conference.

For conference updates and additional information about the Society for the Study of American Women Writers, please visit the 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference tab on our main menu

Call for Submissions: 2021 SSAWW Awards (Deadline: 2.1.2021)

Call for Submissions: 2021 SSAWW Awards

The Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW) was founded in 2000 in order to promote the study of American women writers through research, teaching, and publication. In support of that mission, the three awards were established in 2011 to honor the work and legacies of the Society’s founding members and to further SSAWW’s goals to broaden knowledge among academics as well as the general public about American women writers, past and present. As we begin preparations for the 2021 SSAWW conference in Baltimore, this is a call for submissions for our 2021 SSAWW Awards.  All nominations must be submitted by February 1, 2021.

Lifetime Achievement Award: The Karen Dandurand Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded every three years at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers’ conference to recognize a scholar’s career achievement in the study of American women writers. The award recognizes the individual’s commitment to the field, as demonstrated in her/his/their teaching, mentoring of students, scholarship, and service. The award is named in honor of Karen Dandurand, who passed away in 2011. She was one of the founding editors of Legacy and was an active member of SSAWW, serving as the Vice President of Development from 2004 to 2009. Nominators should submit a CV and brief (250 to 500 word) letter of support in one PDF file to the Lifetime Achievement Award  Chair: Dr. Julie Goodspeed-Chadwick, by February 1, 2021. She will distribute all nominations to the committee members. Please contact Dr. Goodspeed-Chadwick at juligood@iu.edu and  CC the Vice President of Development, Dr. Ellen Gruber Garvey ssaww.vpdevelopment@gmail.com to submit for this award.

Book Award: The SSAWW Book Award is given every three years at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers’ conference to recognize excellence in the field. The award will recognize the monograph’s significant contributions to scholarship related to American women writers published during the preceding three years before the deadline for submission. Eligible books must have been published between December 2017 and November 2020. Edited collections and not eligible for the award. Nominators should contact the Book Award Chair,  Dr. Kate Adams. She will provide information about distributing submissions to committee members (those submitting work for the award should contact their presses to have review copies sent to the committee). Please contact Dr.  Adams at adamsk918@gmail.com  and CC the VP of Development, Dr. Ellen Gruber Garvey ssaww.vpdevelopment@gmail.com to submit for this award.

Edition Award: The SSAWW Edition Award is given every three years at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers’ conference in order to recognize excellence in the recovery of American women writers. The award recognizes an edition published during the preceding three years before the submission deadline. Eligible books must have been published between December 2017 and November 2020. Both print and digital collections are welcome. Nominators should contact the Edition Award Chair, Dr. Jennifer Putzi. She will provide information about distributing submissions to committee members (those submitting work for the award should contact their presses to have review copies sent to the committee). Please contact Dr. Putzi at  jlputz@wm.ed adamsk918@gmail.com  and CC the VP of Development, Dr. Ellen Gruber Garvey ssaww.vpdevelopment@gmail.com to submit for this award.

CFP: Roundtable for NeMLA Virtual Conference (Deadline: 10.19.2020)

Call for Papers for NeMLA’s 2021 virtual conference from March 11-14

Northeast Modern Language Association Conference

3/11/21 – 3/14/21, Philadelphia, PA

This roundtable will explore manifestations of the grotesque in various forms and genres, from a range of periods, and from a range of critical approaches. These might include, but not be exclusive to, analyses informed by posthumanism, postmaterialism, postmillenniallism, or a similar critical lens. In an age when so much seems grotesque—from our art to our politics to our everyday lives—this session will provide not only new ways to think about literature informed by or exhibiting elements of the grotesque but also ways to conceptualize our current historical and cultural moment. Submit a 250-300 word abstract and a brief c.v. by Oct. 19 to the NeMLA website: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/CFP

For inquiries, contact Mary Balkun: mary.balkun@shu.edu

Job: Research Assistant Professor at IRIS Center Southern Illinois University Edwardsville (Deadline: 10.30.2020)

Faculty Position FY21-020
October 5, 2020 

Title
Research Assistant Professor

Hiring Unit
College of Arts & Sciences, Interdisciplinary Research and Informatics Scholarship Center (IRIS) 

Job Description/Responsibilities
The Research Assistant Professor will contribute to engaged, inclusive digital scholarship and teaching across campus. The selected candidate will serve as the initial point of referral for digital research and teaching projects. Duties and responsibilities include the following:

  • Offering in-depth consultations for faculty and students on digital humanities-related research and technology design.
  • Designing and delivering instruction to classes, research groups, and other audiences.
  • Working with colleagues on digital humanities-related publications and outreach.
  • Contributing to and consulting on grant writing activities related to digital humanities projects.
  • Assisting with project management for on-going IRIS Center projects.
  • Mentoring students enrolled in the IRIS minor and contributing to student internships.
  • Teaching the 200-level, interdisciplinary introduction to the digital humanities course yearly. 

Terms of Appointment
Term appointment beginning fall/early winter 2020; promotion eligible. 

Source of Funds
State 

Salary Range
Commensurate with experience and credentials. 

Minimum Qualifications
Applicants will have a Ph.D. in a humanities-related discipline and will have worked in a digital humanities center or on digital humanities projects.  Persons who have not completed all terminal degree requirements may be considered, but all degree requirements must be completed at time of hire.  Applicants must have experience with HTML, CSS, PHP, Python, and CMS customization. 

Closing Date for Applications
Application materials must be submitted by October 30, 2020

Application Process
Candidates should submit an initial letter of application and vita, name and contact information for at least three references, a portfolio of digital work with activity links, transcripts (copies acceptable for initial submission, official will be required as part of the interview process), a statement of teaching experience and philosophy, and a statement addressing experiences and competencies in supporting equity, inclusion, and diversity to: 

IRIS Center
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Campus Box 1458
Edwardsville, IL 62026

For electronic submissions, send materials in PDF format to: methrid@siue.edu 

Interviews to be held via phone or video conference. 

Application Deadline
Applications materials must be submitted by October 30, 2020. 

SIUE is a state university – benefits under state sponsored plans may not be available to holders of F1 or J1 visas. Applicants will be subject to a background check prior to an offer of employment.

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is an Equal Opportunity Employer committed to an inclusive and diverse workforce. We will not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, national origin, religion, disability, age, marital status, sex, sexual orientation or veteran’s status. We encourage applications from women, minorities, protected veterans and people with disabilities. 

The SIUE Annual Security and Fire Safety Report is available online at http://www.siue.edu/securityreport. The report contains campus safety and security information, crime statistics, fire safety policies, and fire statistics for the previous three calendar years. This report is published in compliance with Federal law, titled the “Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act” and the Higher Education Opportunity Act also known as the “Campus Fire Safety Right to Know.” For those without computer access, a paper copy of the report may be obtained, with a 24-hour notice, from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Administration, Rendleman Hall, Room 2228, 618-650-2536.

SIUE is focused on the health and safety of our faculty and staff while remaining committed to serving our students with the excellence that is a hallmark of SIUE.  Our Cougar Commitment plan provides both broad and specific actions that will allow SIUE to restore much of our campus’ energy through a safe and intentional science-based approach.  The role of higher education continues to be critical to the well-being of our communities and sustainability. Our careful planning is a testament to the importance of that mission, our stewardship and responsibilities to help shape a changing world.   

For more information on Our Cougar Commitment, visit our COVID-19 Response website at: https://www.siue.edu/about/announcements/coronavirus/  

Dual Career Support for New Faculty

The Career Development Center has partnered with SIUE’s Toward an Inclusive Model of Excellence project to provide a variety of career services and resources to partners of new faculty who have relocated to the Greater St. Louis area. Visit them online at: Dual Career Support