CFP: The Gender Issue in Stage and Screen Adaptations of Richard Wright’s Literary Works (Deadline: 8.2.2021)

Call for Submission in Palimpsest: A Journal on Women, Gender, and the Black International

The Gender Issue in Stage and Screen Adaptations of Richard Wright’s Literary Works

Palimpsest invites submissions that focus on gender in stage and screen adaptations of Richard Wright’s literary works.  Adaptations of Wright’s work began almost immediately after his first important work Native Son sold more than 250,000 copies within three weeks of its publication in March of 1940.  One year after its publication Orson Welles and John Houseman’s Mercury Theater mounted a production of Native Son, adapted by Wright and Paul Green and starring Canada Lee for New York’s Broadway stage. Three film adaptations have been made of Native Son—one in Argentina in 1951 with Wright himself as Bigger Thomas; another in 1986 in which Oprah Winfrey portrayed Bigger’s mother; and most recently in 2019 with a screenplay by Pulitzer prize winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks and directed by the conceptual artist Rashid Johnson.  In addition, theater companies and independent filmmakers in the US and internationally have adapted works written by Wright.

Gender has always been a source of consternation and debate about Wright’s work.  Part of the notoriety that followed Native Son were accusations of misogyny posited by notable Black feminist scholars in the 1980s. Years after the publication of Native Son, we learned that editors excised sections of Native Son to make Bigger appear more heterosexual, and his masculinity less deviant.

Our focus in this call is meant to reflect gender studies and its intersection with performance.  Gender studies is attentive to the construction, articulation, and performance of gender identities and their intersections with other predominant social categories such as social class, race, ethnicity, and/or nationality.  Some of the most important insights about these intersections that we wish to continue in this volume are from diverse disciplinary and analytical perspectives including women’s studies, Black feminist studies, queer studies, African American/Black studies, global Black studies,  disability studies, and the recently forming Black male studies. We seek for publication consideration essays, commentary, as well as interviews with playwrights and screenplay writers, and directors of Wright productions.

Suggested topics include:

— Representations of women and men and their intersection with race in adaptations of Native Son

— The treatment of homosociality, male bonding, and patriarchy in adaptations

— Gender in adaptations of “lesser known” Richard Wright works for stage and screen, e.g “Long Black Song”

–Black feminist critiques of screen versions of Native Son

— Reception of performances of Wright in international and global contexts

— Genre and gender in adaptations (e.g., film noir, horror, satire)

— Queer and queer of color critiques of screen versions of Native Son or other adaptations of his work

— Disability studies approaches to screen versions of Native Son

— Comparative studies that emphasize gender in adaptations of Native Son with other works for screen and stage

Please submit a 200-300 word proposal by August 2, 2021 that includes your name and email address.  Full essays for accepted proposals are due by February 7, 2022.  All submissions should not exceed 7,000 words and must use Chicago Style.  Please see journal guidelines for more on the submission policy:

https://my.vanderbilt.edu/palimpsest/submissions-guidelines/

Direct all questions, correspondence, and submissions to the guest editors Dr. Charles I. Nero cnero@bates.edu and Dr. Tara T. Green lhspresidentgreen@gmail.com

2021 SSAWW Conference – Hotel Information & Flight Bookings

2021 SSAWW Conference – Hotel Information

Royal Sonesta Harbor Court Baltimore

We have a block of rooms reserved at the Royal Sonesta Harbor Court hotel.  Please use the link below to reserve your room and receive the discounted conference attendee rate. *Note when using the link below, please update the date fields at the top for your preferred check-in/out days and number of guests.

For those driving to Baltimore, we are pleased to announce that SSAWW has negotiated a discounted rate for valet parking at the hotel of $15 per day.

For those flying to Baltimore, we urge conference attendees to check flights early as prices are expected to rise rapidly. Members of the conference planning committee have recommended flight tracking apps including: KAYAK · Skyscanner · Hopper · Airfarewatchdog · Yapta to help with finding the best price.

**Update 7/20th: We are experiencing an error with the link below in changing the check-in/out dates for reservations. We’re working with the hotel to resolve this issue. Thank you for your patience.

Link to Reserve Rooms at the Royal Sonesta Harbor Court

2021 Triennial Conference Graduate Student Registration Waiver (For Service) – Deadline 8.10.2021 to apply

The Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW) is pleased to support graduate students with registration waivers in exchange for four hours of service at the registration desk or providing other suppour at the 2021 Triennial Conference. These waivers (covering the full cost of registration) will be available to a select number of graduate students based upon our needs. In order to apply, your membership with SSAWW must be current and you must be presenting on a panel or roundtable at the conference.

The SSAWW Executive Committee asks that those fortunate enough to have full financial support from their home institutions decline the reimbursement (please let us know as soon as possible after applying if you fall into this category).

Applications must be received no later than August 10, 2021. Please note, however, that late applications cannot be considered.

2021 Graduate Student Registration Waiver (For Service) – APPLY HERE

2021 SSAWW – Call for Graduate Student Travel Award (Deadline: 10.1.2021)

The Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW) is pleased to support graduate students with travel awards to our 2021 Triennial Conference. These awards (a minimum of fifty dollars) will be available to all graduate students whose membership with SSAWW is current, who are registered for the conference by October 1, 2021, and who are presenting on panel or roundtable at the conference. Those who apply will receive a check when they arrive to pick up their registration materials (badge, etc.) at the conference.

To ensure that we can provide assistance to the greatest number of graduate students possible, the SSAWW Executive Committee asks that those fortunate enough to have full support from their home institutions decline the reimbursement (please let us know as soon as possible after applying if you fall into this category).

Applications must be received no later than October 1, 2021. Please note, however, that late applications cannot be considered.

2021 Graduate Student Travel Award – APPLY HERE

CFP for Edited Collection: Scripting the Past in the Present: Early America and Contemporary Culture (Proposal Deadline: 9.3.2021)

Scripting the Past in the Present: Early America and Contemporary Culture

Edited Collection

Editors: Patrick M. Erben and Rebecca L. Harrison

Proposal Deadline: September 3, 2021

The editors seek critical and pedagogical essays for a book collection that critically examines the reverberations and re-scripting of early America (its literature, history, art, politics, religion, material culture, public spectacle, monuments, etc.) in contemporary culture.

As recent controversies about Critical Race Theory, the 1619 Project, and colonial and confederate monuments demonstrate, contemporary conversations about the early American past are quite often uninformed about the texts, histories, stories, and sensibilities of the colonial, early-national, and pre-Civil War periods. At the same time, themes and figures from early American literature and history pervade present-day culture. Beyond well-known examples like Disney’s Pocahontas and Lin-Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster Hamilton, contemporary writers and artists in literary and popular venues take up and rework early American materials in both explicit and implicit ways. These texts translate the unfamiliar language and sensibilities of early America as a usable past to find common denominators that address historic and ever-present concerns with social justice and definitions of democracy for the general public. These links reveal present-day echoes of early America that make visible intricate transhistorical nexuses that scholars and teachers alike must grapple with both in and out of the classroom.

The editors welcome critical and pedagogical contributions across fields that explore the intersection of contemporary and early American imaginaries in 20th and 21st century works, including but not limited to film, TV, graphic novels, literature, music, video games, etc. Interested contributors should send the following to Dr. Patrick Erben (perben@westga.edu) and Dr. Rebecca Harrison (rharriso@westga.edu) by September 3, 2021:

·        proposal of no more than 1000 words,

·        brief professional author bio,

·        and curriculum vitae.

Selected contributors will be notified by

Scripting the Past in the Present: Early America and Contemporary Culture

Edited Collection

Editors: Patrick M. Erben and Rebecca L. Harrison

Proposal Deadline: September 3, 2021

The editors seek critical and pedagogical essays for a book collection that critically examines the reverberations and re-scripting of early America (its literature, history, art, politics, religion, material culture, public spectacle, monuments, etc.) in contemporary culture.

As recent controversies about Critical Race Theory, the 1619 Project, and colonial and confederate monuments demonstrate, contemporary conversations about the early American past are quite often uninformed about the texts, histories, stories, and sensibilities of the colonial, early-national, and pre-Civil War periods. At the same time, themes and figures from early American literature and history pervade present-day culture. Beyond well-known examples like Disney’s Pocahontas and Lin-Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster Hamilton, contemporary writers and artists in literary and popular venues take up and rework early American materials in both explicit and implicit ways. These texts translate the unfamiliar language and sensibilities of early America as a usable past to find common denominators that address historic and ever-present concerns with social justice and definitions of democracy for the general public. These links reveal present-day echoes of early America that make visible intricate transhistorical nexuses that scholars and teachers alike must grapple with both in and out of the classroom.

The editors welcome critical and pedagogical contributions across fields that explore the intersection of contemporary and early American imaginaries in 20th and 21st century works, including but not limited to film, TV, graphic novels, literature, music, video games, etc. Interested contributors should send the following to Dr. Patrick Erben (perben@westga.edu) and Dr. Rebecca Harrison (rharriso@westga.edu) by September 3, 2021:

·        proposal of no more than 1000 words,

·        brief professional author bio,

·        and curriculum vitae.

Selected contributors will be notified by September 24, 2021 with essays due January 4, 2022.

CFP (2 panels): Scripting the Past in the Present Early America and Contemporary Culture SAMLA (Deadline: 7.30.2021)

Scripting the Past in the Present:  

Early America and Contemporary Culture 

SAMLA 93, November 4-6, 2021 (Atlanta, GA) 

Patrick M. Erben and Rebecca L. Harrison, University of West Georgia 

__________________________________________ 

For many present-day readers, early American literature seems a nexus of far removed, boring, stodgy, and simply no longer relevant texts, ideas, authors, and tropes. Yes, we hear politicians frequently invoke the “Founding Fathers” and the ideals of the American Revolution in their rhetoric, but few people voluntarily pick up a sermon by Cotton Mather, an exploration narrative by John Smith, Mary Rowlandson’s captivity narrative, or even Benjamin Franklin’s famous Autobiography as pleasure reading. Yet, if we look a bit more closely, early American literature and history pervade contemporary culture, especially in the 20th and 21st centuries. Beyond well-known examples like Disney’s Pocahontas and Lin-Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster Hamilton that made Aaron Burr a household name, contemporary writers and artists in literary and popular venues take up and rework early American materials in both explicit and implicit ways. Such texts translate the unfamiliar language and sensibilities of early America as a usable past to find common denominators that address (and often problematize) historic and ever-present concerns with social justice and definitions of democracy for the general public. Ultimately, these links reveal the complementary nature of early American themes and their present-day echoes, establishing intricate transhistorical nexuses that scholars and teachers alike must grapple with and purposely deploy to help students overcome temporal, cultural, and linguistic distances that often limit comprehension, familiarization, and the ability to see the present-day import of our nation’s past.   

In the spirit of fostering dialogue in this area, we seek paper proposals for two panels—one critical and one pedagogical (complementary approaches often seen as disparate)—that explore networks connecting contemporary and early American imaginaries. Interested panelists should send abstracts of no more than 500 words to Dr. Patrick Erben (perben@westga.edu) and Dr. Rebecca Harrison (rharriso@westga.edu) by July 30, 2021. 

2021 SSAWW Conference Registration – Now Open

Registration for the 2021 SSAWW Conference is now open!

A draft of the conference program will be available in early June for planning purposes.  In the coming weeks we will also have additional details on hotel reservations and graduate student travel awards. 

Visit our conference page to find out more information about the conference and to register for 2021 SSAWW – https://ssawwnew.wordpress.com/2021-ssaww-triennial-conference/

SSAWW 2021 Keynote Speaker: Dr. Joyce J. Scott

“I’d like my art to induce people to stop raping, torturing, and shooting each other.

I don’t have the ability to end violence, racism, and sexism. But my art can help them look and think.”

—Joyce J. Scott 

MacArthur Fellow, Dr. Joyce J. Scott (b. 1948, Baltimore, MD) is best known for her figurative sculpture and jewelry using bead weaving techniques, as well as blown glass, and found objects.  As an African-American, feminist artist, Scott unapologetically confronts difficult themes as diverse as her subjects which include race, misogyny, sexuality, stereotypes, gender inequality, economic disparity, history, politics, rape, and discrimination. Over the past 50 years,  Scott has also established herself as an innovative fiber artist, print maker, installation artist, vocalist, and  performer.   

Joyce J. Scott  was born to sharecroppers in North Carolina who were descendants of slaves. Her family migrated to Baltimore,  where Joyce was born and raised. She earned her BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art, MFA from the Instituto Allende in Mexico, and was conferred honorary doctorates from both The Maryland Institute College of Art  and California College of the Arts. 

In 2017, Scott and her primary gallery, Goya Contemporary, opened her largest exhibition to date at Grounds For Sculpture in New Jersey.   In addition to historic and recent objects, Scott realized 2 large-scale site-specific works focused on the abolitionist Harriet Tubman, created at the Johnson Atelier.  Other major projects include glassworks made at Berengo Glass Studios on the Italian island of Murano, Italy, which were exhibited in the 2013 Venice Biennale collateral exhibition Glasstress, and a major one-person exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art.      Scott   has been the recipient of many commissions, grants, awards, and honors  from such institutions as the National Endowment for the Arts, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation, Anonymous Was a Woman, American Craft Council, National Living Treasure, Women’s Caucus for the Arts, The National Academy of Design, The Baker Award, MacArthur Foundation Fellowship Award, New York University Fellowship Award, and the Smithsonian Visionary Artist Award. Scott explores challenging subjects, powerfully revealing the equality between materials and practices often associated with “craft” and “fine art.”   She currently lives and works in Baltimore, Maryland, and is represented by Goya Contemporary Gallery.

New Book: Newspaper Confessions

Author: Julie Golia

Newspaper Confessions

A History of Advice Columns in a Pre-Internet Age

Oxford University Press, 2021

What can century-old advice columns tell us about the Internet today? This book reveals the little-known history of advice columns in American newspapers and the virtual communities they created among their readers.

Imagine a community of people who had never met writing into a media outlet, day after day, to reveal intimate details about their lives, anxieties, and hopes. The original “virtual communities” were born not on the Internet in chat rooms but a century earlier in one of America’s most ubiquitous news features: the advice column.

Newspaper Confessions is the first history of the newspaper advice column, a genre that has shaped Americans’ relationships with media, their experiences with popular therapy, and their virtual interactions across generations. Emerging in the 1890s, advice columns became unprecedented virtual forums where readers could debate the most resonant cultural crises of the day with strangers in an anonymous, yet strikingly public, forum. Early advice columns are essential–and overlooked–precursors to today’s digital culture: forums, social media groups, chat rooms, and other online communities that define how present-day American communicate with each other.

By charting the economic and cultural motivations behind the rise of this influential genre, Julie Golia offers a nuanced analysis of the advice given by a diverse sample of columns across several decades, emphasizing the ways that advice columnists framed their counsel as modern, yet upheld the racial and gendered status quo of the day. She offers lively, surprising, and poignant case studies, demonstrating how columnists and everyday newspaper readers transformed advice columns into active and participatory virtual communities of confession, advice, debate, and empathy. (Description c/o Oxford University Press)

This book is available for purchase from the Oxford University Press website. Use code AAFLYG6 for 30% off at global.oup.com/academic

You can also hear a conversation with the author and Daniel Lavery, Slate’s current Dear Prudence and the author of Something that May Shock and Discredit You, recorded here:
https://www.crowdcast.io/e/confessions

You can hear a conversation with her and Daniel Lavery, Slate’s current Dear Prudence and the author of Something that May Shock and Discredit You, recorded here:
https://www.crowdcast.io/e/confessions