SSAWW

CFP: Pauline Hopkins Society Scholar Award (Deadline 04.15.2017)

2017 – Pauline Hopkins Scholar Award

The Pauline Hopkins Society (http://www.paulinehopkinssociety.org) is pleased to announce its second bi-annual competition for the best essay or book chapter on Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins published between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2016.  If you have published an essay or chapter that discusses Hopkins and/or her work, we invite you to consider entering before the April 15, 2017 deadline.

Because entries will be judged through a system of blind reviewing we recommend that any self-citation, either in the body or in notes, be reworked to the third person.

How to Enter:

Essays should be double-spaced throughout, with your name appearing only on the cover sheet, along with your institutional mailing address and e-mail address.

Please send essay as a pdf email attachment by April 15, 2017 to: PHSscholaraward@gmail.com

The award of a $100 cash prize will be presented during a special ceremony commemorating Hopkins and her work in Boston during the American Literature Association annual conference in May 2017.

Call for Graduate Student Writers “The Year in Conferences”: ASLE (Deadline 03.31.2017)

ESQ: A Journal of Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture is seeking participants to cover the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment convention in Detroit this June for its annual “The Year in Conferences” feature.
The ASLE team will cover panels of interest to ESQ‘s readers.  This project is an excellent opportunity for scholarly collaboration and professionalization. YiC has been recognized by scholars not just for its utility but also as a mentoring and networking tool. From the initial recruiting stages to panel selection and publication of the final piece, YiC creates a supportive, collaborative environment that encourages participants to do their best work.  Past YiC writers have found the experience very rewarding.
We seek a team of Ph.D. students working in nineteenth-century American literature.  If you are interested in participating, please send a C.V. and brief message describing your scholarly interests to Marlowe Daly-Galeano at hmdalygaleano@lcsc.edu by March 31.  Applicants will be notified in April.

CFP: Rural Women in North America, essay collection (Deadline: 03.31.17)

We invite abstracts for a proposed collection of critical essays focused on historical and contemporary representations of rural women in North America.

We are interested in interdisciplinary topics and theoretical approaches that help provide new understandings of the lives and experiences of rural women. We are seeking contributors from English, American studies, history, women’s and gender studies, ethnic studies, popular culture studies, communication, film and media studies, sociology, anthropology, political science, and other relevant disciplines. Contributions may include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Representations of rural women in literature, film, and television
  • Rural women and poverty
  • Race, racism, and immigration among rural women
  • Rural women and the environment
  • Rural women and health
  • Government policies and programs that impact rural women
  • Collective organizing among rural women
  • Rural women and the use of social media
  • Rural women in Trump America

The collection will be organized into thematic sections around these topics or others that emerge from submissions. Feel free to contact the co-editors with questions about the project and share the announcement widely with colleagues.

Please submit a 300-word abstract, or manuscript of previously unpublished work, plus a 150-word biographical sketch to the co-editors of the volume: Margaret Thomas Evans, Chair, Department of English, Indiana University East (margevan@iue.edu); H. Louise Davis, Department of Interdisciplinary and Communication Studies, Miami University (davishl3@miamioh.edu);  and Whitney Womack Smith, Chair, Department of Languages, Literatures, and Writing, Miami University (womackwa@miamioh.edu).

The deadline for receipt of abstracts is 31 March 2017. We anticipate that complete chapters of 4000-6000 words will be due 30 November 2017.

CFP: Transformations of Gertrude Stein (MLA 2018)

CFP: Transformations of Gertrude Stein (MLA 2018)

This panel takes its title from Marianne DeKoven’s introduction to Modern Fiction Studies’ special issue on Gertrude Stein, and seeks new perspectives on Stein’s work, life and celebrity. “Cases no longer need to be made for Stein’s importance,” DeKoven observed in 1996; “she has become a figure of limitless capaciousness and magnitude, a site of potentiality.” Two decades later, how is Stein’s critical legacy being transformed? How does her work speak to trends in different fields; and how does new work in those fields in turn reinvigorate readings of Stein?
Please send 300 word abstracts and a brief bio to Madison Priest, mpriest@gradcenter.cuny.edu.

CFP: Feminist Pedagogy in Digital Spaces: An Electronic Roundtable (Deadline 3.10.17)

CFP: Feminist Pedagogy in Digital Spaces: An Electronic Roundtable

Organized by the Committee on the Status of Women in the Profession

MLA Convention, New York City, January 4-7, 2018 (proposals due March 10)

Digital spaces present a number of challenges to feminist discourses: platforms such as Twitter suffer from design affordances that amplify trolling and harassment, unmoderated online forums can easily become havens for misogynist discourse, and being visible as a woman online is associated with sexual harassment and continual microaggressions. The recent election and its aftermath have particularly brought attention to the discursive challenges faced in the context of charged, intersectional, feminist debate. However, digital spaces are increasingly sites of learning, from massively online courses to online and mixed mode learning conducted in learning management systems such as Blackboard and Canvas. We will examine methods for integrating feminist discourse into digital pedagogy while considering the challenges of accessibility and inclusion.

This roundtable intersects with previous conversations surrounding digital pedagogy at the MLA, but makes explicit the challenges that traditional digital humanities assumptions present for marginalized voices and feminist discourse. As a digital roundtable, this session will include a short overview with interactive digital display stations for each participant to engage with small groups in dialogue throughout the event. We invite proposals of 250-300 words addressing:

  • Tools and strategies for creating intersectional feminist spaces within existing learning management systems

  • Successful (and unsuccessful!) uses of technology in literature and writing curriculum

  • Digital projects (such as games and web resources) designed to support intersectional feminist pedagogy

  • Social media-based experiments or exercises designed for deployment in the literature or writing classroom

  • Products and methods for critical making as part of intersectional feminist pedagogy

Presenters should include specific information on what they plan to share as part of their digital display. Please email your submissions to anastasia.salter@gmail.com and scordell@umich.edu by March 10th.

Sigrid Anderson Cordell, Ph.D. | Librarian for English Language and Literature and Lecturer in American Culture | University of Michigan |

Edith Wharton Society – Member-at-Large Executive Board Positions

The Edith Wharton Society seeks to fill up to two Member-at-Large positions on its Executive Board for the 2017-19 term. If you are interested in serving, please send your name and a brief biographical statement (one paragraph) to the EWS Secretary, Jennifer Haytock, at jhaytock@brockport.edu by March 30, 2017. We will hold elections after that date, and the two candidates who receive the most votes will serve.

In order to encourage broad participation, the EWS particularly encourages new nominations. Candidates must be members in good standing of the Edith Wharton Society. Membership dues can be paid here:

https://edithwhartonsociety.wordpress.com/membership/

The Society’s by-laws, which outline the responsibilities of the Members at Large, can be found here:

https://edithwhartonsociety.wordpress.com/membership/constitution-and-by-laws/2015-constitution/

Interested persons may also contact any current Board member for more information.

CFP: Callaloo Special Issue (Deadline 08.01.2017)

Callaloo invites papers for a special issue devoted to the life and work of the late poet, fiction writer, playwright, and scholar, Sherley Anne Williams, guest edited by Wendy W. Walters (Emerson College).

Project Description:
Sherley Anne Williams was a talented author/scholar, publishing in many genres. Her novel, Dessa Rose,preceded Toni Morrison’s Beloved by one year and has been read as an inaugural example of the neo-slave narrative genre. Her short fiction is anthologized in multiple collections. Williams’ first book of poetry, The Peacock Poems (Wesleyan 1975), was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award. Her second poetry book, Some One Sweet Angel Chile (William Morrow 1982) was also nominated for a National Book Award, and she received an Emmy Award for a televised performance of these poems. Her prose poem, “Letters from a New England Negro,” published in Iowa Review, became a one-woman drama, which was performed at several important theatre festivals. A theatrical version of Williams’s novel, Dessa Rose, was performed as an off-Broadway musical in 2005. She also published two children’s books in the 1990s.Working Cotton received both a Caldecott Award and a Coretta Scott King Book Award. Her second children’s book, Girls Together, was published in 1999.

As Mae Henderson wrote in her memorial tribute in Callaloo, “her achievements betoken the legacy this generation will pass on to its survivors. Our community is a poorer place without Sherley Anne Williams; our inheritance, a richer one because of her song:

These is old blues
and I sing em like any woman do.
These is old blues
and I sing em, sing em, sing em. Just like any woman do.
My life ain’t done yet
Naw. My song ain’t through.”

New essays on any aspect of Sherley Anne Williams’ writing are sought, from a variety of critical and interpretive perspectives. Specific topics and themes may include, but are not limited to:

–       blues idioms; language; orality; music
–       gender studies; black womanist theory
–       depictions of nature; ecocritical readings
–       sexuality and the erotic
–       dramatic collaborations; adaptation of poetry to stage/screen
–       Working Cotton, and Girls Together, and multicultural children’s literature
–       working class literature; agricultural labor
–       reconsidering the neoslave narrative; historical/archival revision
–       Williams’s influences; intertextuality
–       sisterhood; family bonds
–       geography; migration; diaspora
–       critical race theory

Callaloo Submission Guidelines:
Manuscripts must be submitted online through the Callaloo manuscript submission system by August 1, 2017. Please see the submission guidelines here:
http://callaloo.expressacademic.org/login.php. In order to submit a manuscript, you must register with the online system. The registration process will only take a few minutes. All manuscripts will follow the usual review process for submissions, and the Callaloo editor makes all final editorial decisions. Please note all manuscripts must follow the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (3rd Edition) and include in-text citations, a works cited, and endnotes for any commentary.

Guest Editor:
Wendy W. Walters is a Professor in the department of Writing, Literature, and Publishing, at Emerson College, Boston, teaching courses in African American and African diaspora literature and culture. She is the author of two books, Archives of the Black Atlantic: Reading Between Literature and History (Routledge, March 2013), and At Home in Diaspora: Black International Literature (U of Minnesota, 2005). She has also published articles in Callaloo, American Literature, African American Review, Novel, and MELUS.

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