New Books: Over the River and Through the Wood: An Anthology of Nineteenth-Century American Children’s Poetry

woodsOver the River and Through the Wood: An Anthology of Nineteenth-Century American Children’s Poetry
 edited by Karen L. Kilcup and Angela Sorby

Over the River and Through the Wood is the first and only collection of its kind, offering readers an unequaled view of the quality and diversity of nineteenth-century American children’s poetry. Most American poets wrote for children—from famous names such as Ralph Waldo Emerson to less familiar figures like Christina Moody, an African American author who published her first book at sixteen. In its excellence, relevance, and abundance, much of this work rivals or surpasses poetry written for adults, yet it has languished—inaccessible and unread—in old periodicals, gift books, and primers. This groundbreaking anthology remedies that loss, presenting material that is both critical to the tradition of American poetry and also a delight to read.

Complemented by period illustrations, this definitive collection includes work by poets from all geographical regions, as well as rarely seen poems by immigrant and ethnic writers and by children themselves. Karen L. Kilcup and Angela Sorby have combed the archives to present an extensive selection of rediscoveries along with traditional favorites. By turns playful, contemplative, humorous, and subversive, these poems appeal to modern sensibilities while giving scholars a revised picture of the nineteenth-century literary landscape

CFP: Dickinson Institute (Deadline 1.15.15)

Call for Papers: Dickinson Institute

On Friday, August 7, 2015, the Emily Dickinson International Society will sponsor a critical institute in conjunction with its Annual Meeting. The Institute provides an opportunity for participants to workshop critical essays and conference papers with established Dickinson scholars.  The topic for this year¹s meeting is “Dickinson in her Elements.” Applicants working on Dickinson¹s writings in relation to the physical sciences (botany, geology, astronomy, etc.), agriculture, natural and built environments, etc. are encouraged to apply, submissions on all topics will be considered. We welcome applications from graduate students, adjunct faculty, independent scholars, and tenure-track/tenured professors. Please submit a short cv and an abstract (300-350 words) to Eliza Richards (ecr@email.unc.edu) and Alexandra Socarides (socaridesa@missouri.edu) by January 15, 2015. Applicants will be notified by email in February; selected participants will be asked to circulate conference-length (8-10 page) papers to their workshop group by June 15th.

CFP: Transatlantic Studies Association 14th Annual Conference (Deadline 12.1.14)

Transatlantic Studies Association 14th Annual Conference
Roosevelt Study Center  Middelburg, The Netherlands
6 – 8 July 2015

Keynote Lectures:

Jessica Gienow-Hecht (Free University, Berlin)
Inderjeet Parmar (City University, London)

Plenary Roundtable: The Transatlantic Paradigm Reconsidered  (more…)

New Books: Toward a Female Genealogy of Transcendentalism, Edited by Jana Argersinger and Phyllis Cole

9780820343396Toward a Female Genealogy of Transcendentalism
Edited by Jana Argersinger and Phyllis Cole

University of Georgia Press 

http://www.ugapress.org/index.php/books/toward_a_female_genealogy_of_transcendentalism

The first large-scale, collaborative study of women’s voices and their vital role in the American transcendentalist movement.

Traditional histories of the American transcendentalist movement begin in Ralph Waldo Emerson’s terms: describing a rejection of college books and church pulpits in favor of the individual power of “Man Thinking.” This essay collection asks how women who lacked the privileges of both college and clergy rose to thought. For them, reading alone and conversing together were the primary means of growth, necessarily in private and informal spaces both overlapping with those of the men and apart from them. But these were means to achieving literary, aesthetic, and political authority—indeed, to claiming utopian possibility for women as a whole.

Toward a Female Genealogy of Transcendentalism is a project of both archaeology and reinterpretation. Many of its seventeen distinguished and rising scholars work from newly recovered archives, and all offer fresh readings of understudied topics and texts. First quickened by the 2010 bicentennial of Margaret Fuller’s birth, the project reaches beyond Fuller to her female predecessors, contemporaries, and successors throughout the nineteenth century who contributed to or grew from the transcendentalist movement.

Assistant Professor (Providence College)

The Department of English at Providence College invites applications for an Assistant Professor, tenure-track, with a specialty within the fields of Latina/o, Caribbean American, Asian American, and/or Native American literatures.
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Assistant Professor of English (Messiah College)

Assistant Professor of English

The Department of English in the School of the Humanities at Messiah College invites applications for an Assistant Professor of English to begin August 2015.

Position Summary:  The Messiah College English Department invites applications for a full-time, term-tenure track Assistant Professor of English with a specialization in American literature. Ability to teach diverse literatures of the United States and Pre-1900 literature required. Qualified candidates with ability to teach modern American literature and/or critical theory are especially welcome. Capability in digital humanities and/or administration highly desirable.
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New Books: Fallen Forests: Emotion, Embodiment, and Ethics in American Women’s Environmental Writing, 1781-1924 by Karen L. Kilcup

kilcupforestsFallen Forests: Emotion, Embodiment, and Ethics in American Women’s Environmental Writing, 1781-1924
Karen L. Kilcup

http://www.ugapress.org/index.php/books/fallen_forests/

How women writers made powerful emotional, ethical, and spiritual appeals for environmental awareness and transformation

In 1844, Lydia Sigourney asserted, “Man’s warfare on the trees is terrible.” Like Sigourney many American women of her day engaged with such issues as sustainability, resource wars, globalization, voluntary simplicity, Christian ecology, and environmental justice. Illuminating the foundations for contemporary women’s environmental writing, Fallen Forests shows how their nineteenth-century predecessors marshaled powerful affective, ethical, and spiritual resources to chastise, educate, and motivate readers to engage in positive social change.

Fallen Forests contributes to scholarship in American women’s writing, ecofeminism, ecocriticism, and feminist rhetoric, expanding the literary, historical, and theoretical grounds for some of today’s most pressing environmental debates. Karen L. Kilcup rejects prior critical emphases on sentimentalism to show how women writers have drawn on their literary emotional intelligence to raise readers’ consciousness about social and environmental issues. She also critiques ecocriticism’s idealizing tendency, which has elided women’s complicity in agendas that depart from today’s environmental orthodoxies. (more…)

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