CFP for SSAWW: Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society, “Recovering Gilman for the 21st Century” (Panel Deadline: 1.31.2018)

Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society: Recovering Gilman for the 21st Century

The Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society invites proposals for a panel on “Recovering Gilman for the 21st Century” for the SSAWW 2018 Triennial Conference in Denver, Colorado (November 7-11, 2018). This panel will explore how recovery provides new contexts and frameworks for analyzing and teaching Gilman’s work. Topics include but are not limited to

· Recovery of Gilman’s published and unpublished writing

· Digital recovery projects on Gilman’s work

· Teaching Gilman and feminist recovery practices in the classroom

Please send a brief abstract (200-300 words) and short bio to Dr. Jacqueline Emery, SUNY College at Old Westbury,, by January 31, 2018.


CFP: Louisa May Alcott Society Roundtable at ALA (Deadline: 1.19.2018)

CALL FOR PAPERS Roundtable: Louisa May Alcott Society

American Literature Association Conference, San Francisco, CA, May 24-27, 2018

The Newness of Little Women

When it initially appeared in 1868, Little Women broke new ground. Fresh, lively, and distinctly American, in the eyes of its first reviewers, the novel offered up singular depictions of young women and men playing, talking, dreaming, creating, and learning in ways that embodied its era and region and that also immediately generated passionate responses. For this roundtable, we anticipate an animated conversation inspired by concise and stimulating perspectives about the newness of Little Women. Proposals might consider questions such as the following: In what ways did Alcott’s book revolutionize the novel as a genre or form? In what ways did Alcott’s slangy diction transform the language of American literary realism? What are Little Women’s most distinctive contributions to the development of literary or popular culture? How did the novel change the ways writers could represent young people, mothers and families, art and ambition? How does Little Women represent in unique or ephemeral ways its own moment in history? We would also welcome emerging approaches to Little Women: What are the newest or most innovative ways of examining and teaching the novel, and how can they help us see it with fresh eyes? Please send 300-word abstracts by email to Gregory Eiselein and Anne K. Phillips The deadline for proposals is Friday, January 19, 2018. Early submissions welcome.

CFP: SSAWW Panel at the College Language Association Convention (Deadline 9.8.17)

CFP: SSAWW Panel at the College Language Association Convention, April 2018

Hosted by DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois

“Rewrit[ing] the American Literary Landscape”: Immigrant American Women Writers across the Diaspora and Tales of Black Metropolitan Life


In the introduction to her 2002 text, Rereading the Harlem Renaissance, Sharon Lynette Jones, Professor of English at Wright State University, calls attention to the influx of immigrants into the Black metropolis with “blacks from Africa, the Caribbean, and other regions of the United States migrat[ing] to Harlem in search of the American Dream of economic prosperity and equality, often to find that the dream was elusive” (2). Despite being faced with a tense racial climate that limited the social, economic, and political opportunities afforded ethnic minorities, however, the nation’s arriving immigrants fundamentally transformed cities nationwide into epicenters of unprecedented artistic and cultural growth that forever shaped not only the literary landscape but the very notion of what constitutes the American identity. Eager to explore these critical issues in the works of a diverse range of American women writers, the Society for the Study of American Women Writers is pleased to invite proposals for a SSAWW-sponsored panel to be held at the College Language Association Convention in Chicago from April 4 to 7, 2018.

Topics for Consideration

Because of their role in expanding the ethnic diversity of the United States and contributing to the urban artistic revival nationwide, immigrant American women writers across the African diaspora have played a particularly vital role in the American literary and cultural traditions. This panel will therefore ask participants to consider the unique experience of such immigrant women or writers in the city. Presenters, for instance, might explore social, cultural, racial, and political challenges that such women had to overcome in order to survive in a society where women “sometimes faced the triple jeopardy of race, class, and gender oppression” (Jones 2). How did these women not only help “rewrite the American literary landscape” (2) but also paint a fundamentally new picture of American life—one that recognizes the multicultural mosaic emerging in the city, as they share their traditions and cultural backgrounds with the world? Presenters are asked to consider the works of authors including Paule Marshall, Edwidge Danticat, Jamaica Kincaid, and NoViolet Bulawayo to name a few, as they develop proposals for what is sure to be an intellectually-stimulating panel at the 2018 CLA Convention.

The deadline for proposals this year will be September 8, 2017. Please submit a 250- to 500-word abstract and a brief CV (no more than two pages) that includes rank/status (e.g. ABD, Associate Professor, etc.), institutional affiliation (independent scholars are encouraged to submit proposals as well), and past conference presentations. Proposals should be submitted to the SSAWW Vice President of Development, Christopher Allen Varlack, at and note “SSAWW at CLA Proposal” in the E-mail subject line. All proposals should be included as an attachment, preferably as a single PDF document. Confirmation of receipt will be sent within two business days of submission.

While interested participants do not need to be members of SSAWW to submit a proposal for the aforementioned panel, all presenters must be members of SSAWW and the College Language Association by February 1, 2018 in order to participate in this panel. For more information about SSAWW or CLA, please visit or respectively.

Proposed SSAWW Edited Collection and Senior Scholar to Write Preface

Call for Proposed SSAWW Edited Collection and Senior Scholar


The Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW) is seeking abstracts (250 words) for essays (7500-8500 words, excluding notes) on American women writers and liminality for a proposed edited collection. We also seek a senior scholar in the field of American women writers to write the preface to the collection and, if interested, join the team as a co-editor.

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CFP: Critical Insights: The Harlem Renaissance (Essay Collection: Abstracts by 12.31.14)

Critical Insights: The Harlem Renaissance

under contract with Salem Press

In the course of African-American cultural history, the Harlem Renaissance, also known as the New Negro movement, has proven one of the most influential in shaping and directing black artistic expression. For this collection, Critical Insights: The Harlem Renaissance, we seek a series of essays of five thousand to six thousand words for an anthology that explores the work of some of the most influential and at times controversial authors of the time from Langston Hughes to Claude McKay, Carl van Vechten to Zora Neale Hurston, Jessie Redmon Fauset, and Nella Larsen. Seeking to examine the underlying socio-cultural criticism within their works and the intellectual projects at the heart of their artistic endeavors, this collection offers insight into the era’s most celebrated as well as under-examined authors in hopes of expanding what Miriam Thaggert terms, “the well-worn Harlem Renaissance or New Negro paradigms.” Of course the aforementioned list of authors is only a partial list of an era that also include figures such as Richard Bruce Nugent, Dorothy West, Marita Bonner, James Weldon Johnson, and more, so we urge potential authors to consider other figures not included in this list. Continue reading

CFP for SSAWW 2015 Panel: Rhyme as Liminal Space in Nineteenth Century Poetry (Deadline: Jan. 1, 2015)

CFP for a panel on rhyme in nineteenth century poetry for next fall’s SSAWW conference.

CFP: Rhyme as Liminal Space in Nineteenth Century Poetry (Deadline: Jan. 1, 2015)

Nineteenth century poetry is overwhelmingly driven by its rhymes, yet it is also overwhelmingly maligned for them. Very often, the kinds of rhymes in these poems are viewed as rigid, stultifying, predictable, or old-fashioned—as “mere jingling,” not worthy of much serious attention. Poet A.E. Stallings, however, writing in 2009, describes rhyme of any kind as a liminal space where something mysterious and transformative happens between words: “Rhyme is an irrational, sensual link between two words. It is chemical. It is alchemical.” Using Stallings’s definition as point of departure, this panel welcomes papers on any aspect of rhyme in poetry by nineteenth century American women, including (but not limited to) the following:

  • True rhyme
  • Slant rhyme
  • Eye rhyme
  • Stock rhyme, expected rhyme, “bad” rhyme
  • Rhyme in political poetry
  • Rhyme and genre
  • Rhyme and form
  • Rhyme and performance
  • Rhyme and humor
  • Rhyme and emotion
  • Rhyme and inversion
  • “Feminine” rhymes

Please send an abstract (300-500 words) and a brief bio to Melissa Range at by January 1, 2015.