2021 SSAWW Conference Registration – Now Open

Registration for the 2021 SSAWW Conference is now open!

A draft of the conference program will be available in early June for planning purposes.  In the coming weeks we will also have additional details on hotel reservations and graduate student travel awards. 

Visit our conference page to find out more information about the conference and to register for 2021 SSAWW – https://ssawwnew.wordpress.com/2021-ssaww-triennial-conference/

SSAWW 2021 Keynote Speaker: Dr. Joyce J. Scott

“I’d like my art to induce people to stop raping, torturing, and shooting each other.

I don’t have the ability to end violence, racism, and sexism. But my art can help them look and think.”

—Joyce J. Scott 

MacArthur Fellow, Dr. Joyce J. Scott (b. 1948, Baltimore, MD) is best known for her figurative sculpture and jewelry using bead weaving techniques, as well as blown glass, and found objects.  As an African-American, feminist artist, Scott unapologetically confronts difficult themes as diverse as her subjects which include race, misogyny, sexuality, stereotypes, gender inequality, economic disparity, history, politics, rape, and discrimination. Over the past 50 years,  Scott has also established herself as an innovative fiber artist, print maker, installation artist, vocalist, and  performer.   

Joyce J. Scott  was born to sharecroppers in North Carolina who were descendants of slaves. Her family migrated to Baltimore,  where Joyce was born and raised. She earned her BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art, MFA from the Instituto Allende in Mexico, and was conferred honorary doctorates from both The Maryland Institute College of Art  and California College of the Arts. 

In 2017, Scott and her primary gallery, Goya Contemporary, opened her largest exhibition to date at Grounds For Sculpture in New Jersey.   In addition to historic and recent objects, Scott realized 2 large-scale site-specific works focused on the abolitionist Harriet Tubman, created at the Johnson Atelier.  Other major projects include glassworks made at Berengo Glass Studios on the Italian island of Murano, Italy, which were exhibited in the 2013 Venice Biennale collateral exhibition Glasstress, and a major one-person exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art.      Scott   has been the recipient of many commissions, grants, awards, and honors  from such institutions as the National Endowment for the Arts, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation, Anonymous Was a Woman, American Craft Council, National Living Treasure, Women’s Caucus for the Arts, The National Academy of Design, The Baker Award, MacArthur Foundation Fellowship Award, New York University Fellowship Award, and the Smithsonian Visionary Artist Award. Scott explores challenging subjects, powerfully revealing the equality between materials and practices often associated with “craft” and “fine art.”   She currently lives and works in Baltimore, Maryland, and is represented by Goya Contemporary Gallery.

Reminder: 2021 SSAWW Conference – Upcoming Deadlines

UPCOMING DEADLINES

  • April 12 Confirm or submit any special requests for AV by emailing ssaww.conferences@gmail.com. AV REQUESTS CANNOT BE SUBMITTED AFTER THIS DEADLINE
  • April 12 Confirm receipt of your acceptance by completing the survey (link sent with acceptance letter)
  • June 1 Pay or Renew you SSAWW 2021 Membership Dues
  • September 1 Register for the conference to ensure your place on the program. Registration link will be available in May.

Submissions: 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference (EXTENDED Deadline: 3.8.2021)

Submissions for the 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference

Please send your submissions as PDFs to ssaww.conferences@gmail.com

EXTENDED Deadline: March 8, 2021

Individual paper proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative paper title as well as a proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words with your name and email.

Pre-formed panel proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative panel title and contact information for the session chair. In addition, we will need a tentative title and a brief proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words for each participant. Note that panels typically consist of three, but no more than four, presenters who are each allotted between fifteen and twenty minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

Pre-formed roundtable proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative roundtable title and the contact information for the session chair. In addition, we will need a title and brief proposal of approximately 150 to 250 words for each participant. Note that roundtables typically consist of five to six participants allocated around six to eight minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

Workshop and exhibition proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative session title as well as a brief workshop/exhibition overview of approximately 150 to 250 words. Workshops that would extend beyond traditional session time allotments or require a special space or set up must describe their needs in the proposal. Please include contact information for additional contributors, etc.

Special sessions (for SSAWW affiliate organizations): SSAWW affiliate organizations will be asked to provide a tentative panel title and contact information of the session chair. In addition, we will need a tentative title and a brief proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words for each participant. Note that panels typically consist of three presenters allotted fifteen to twenty minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

For any special sessions (such as a syllabus/assignment exchange, film screening, etc.) that does not follow this format, please contact Dr. Ellen Gruber Garvey directly at ssaww.conferences@gmail.com with a query.

For complete sessions, please ensure that notifications are sent to potential participants by early January at the latest to allow those whose proposals are not accepted for the panel or roundtable to submit individual paper proposals by the submission deadline of March 8, 2021.

Please note (when possible) any A/V requirements for panels (please note that while we do recognize the need for support for some presentations, there are always high costs associated with securing this equipment that require us to be strategic).

Participants are allowed to appear on the final program no more than twice in an effort to allow as many individuals as possible the opportunity to participate. Participants will be listed in the program if they are presenting a paper, participating in a roundtable or workshop, or serving as the chair for a session. Participating in two different roles in the same session (e.g., as the chair and a panelist) would therefore count as two listings in the program. Please note that it is not permissible to present on two panels, though individuals can present as part of a panel and a roundtable session.

For help regarding any technical issues with submitting proposals or questions about the participation guidelines, please contact Dr. Sara Kosiba, Conference Associate for the 2021 conference, at ssaww.conferences@gmail.com; she is also the contact person for scheduling, A/V requests, etc.

For questions regarding the conference itself, please contact the Vice President of Organizational Matters, Dr. Maria Sanchez via E-mail at ssaww.vporganizationalmatters@gmail.com

Note that selected participants must be members of SSAWW no later than June 1, 2021 in order to secure their place on the conference program.

We look forward to receiving proposals for the many thoughtful and informative sessions that our SSAWW members always produce and to seeing you in Baltimore for yet another powerful SSAWW Triennial Conference.

For conference updates and additional information about the Society for the Study of American Women Writers, please visit the 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference tab on our main menu

SSAWW 2021 Conference – CFP Deadline: 2.22.2021

SSAWW 2021 Conference November 4-7, 2021

Royal Sonesta Harbor Court Hotel, Baltimore, Maryland

View the full CFP, calls for panels and roundtables, and submission details HERE

View the call for SSAWW Awards HEREEXTENDED Deadline 2.22.2021

American Women Writers: Ecologies, Survival, Change

“Ecologies, Survival, Change” celebrates the many women across the Americas whose creative work fosters survival and envisions change by exploring the systems in which we live, labor and love. Toni Morrison is our touchstone: her works powerfully remind us that humans, however implicated in damaging structures, can also resist them through networks that sustain and transform.

We offer the term “ecologies” to signify the dynamic, interlocking systems that make up our world, from networks of family and friends to entrenched processes of environmental exploitation to hierarchies of race and gender.  Material and discursive, natural and human created, entrenched and emergent – ecologies integrate diverse, even conflicting, values and effects.  As the novel coronavirus demonstrates, global pandemics and other crises make many ecologies hyper-visible, calling attention to the sustenance which some provide while exacerbating the destructiveness of others.  

Our conference embraces the capacity of creative work to represent existing ecologies and to imagine alternative ones. While we encourage papers, panels, roundtables, and workshops that explore our theme, however, our 2021 conference is not restricted to them. As always, we encourage panel proposals from affiliated societies. As we meet in Baltimore for the first time, we also welcome contributions that highlight the city’s women writers and artists, organizers and organizations.

In the spirit of creating ecologies that sustain us, the 2021 conference will offer numerous opportunities for community-building and personal and professional flourishing: workshops, mentoring, and brainstorming sessions for colleagues at all stages, from graduate students to retirees; opportunities for meditation and exercise; meetings with journal editors; roundtables and discussions about distance teaching and learning. We will also unveil the SSAWW Digital Recovery Hub, a network of scholars grounded in diverse feminist methods which provides resources for digital project consultation and technical assistance for scholars engaged in the recovery work of American women writers.

While we’re planning a face-to-face conference for November 2021, we are monitoring the ongoing situation with COVID-19 and will prepare contingencies as the situation continues to evolve

Proposals for panels, roundtables, and individual papers are to be submitted no later than February 22, 2021.  Details on proposal submissions will be forthcoming.  Please check our website and the SSAWW listserv for future updates on our 2021 Triennial Conference.

2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference – Keynote Speaker – Joyce J. Scott

We are pleased to announce that Dr. Joyce J. Scott will serve as our keynote speaker for the 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference.

“I’d like my art to induce people to stop raping, torturing, and shooting each other.

I don’t have the ability to end violence, racism, and sexism. But my art can help them look and think.”

—Joyce J. Scott 

MacArthur Fellow, Dr. Joyce J. Scott (b. 1948, Baltimore, MD) is best known for her figurative sculpture and jewelry using bead weaving techniques, as well as blown glass, and found objects.  As an African-American, feminist artist, Scott unapologetically confronts difficult themes as diverse as her subjects which include race, misogyny, sexuality, stereotypes, gender inequality, economic disparity, history, politics, rape, and discrimination. Over the past 50 years,  Scott has also established herself as an innovative fiber artist, print maker, installation artist, vocalist, and  performer.   

Joyce J. Scott  was born to sharecroppers in North Carolina who were descendants of slaves. Her family migrated to Baltimore,  where Joyce was born and raised. She earned her BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art, MFA from the Instituto Allende in Mexico, and was conferred honorary doctorates from both The Maryland Institute College of Art  and California College of the Arts. 

In 2017, Scott and her primary gallery, Goya Contemporary, opened her largest exhibition to date at Grounds For Sculpture in New Jersey.   In addition to historic and recent objects, Scott realized 2 large-scale site-specific works focused on the abolitionist Harriet Tubman, created at the Johnson Atelier.  Other major projects include glassworks made at Berengo Glass Studios on the Italian island of Murano, Italy, which were exhibited in the 2013 Venice Biennale collateral exhibition Glasstress, and a major one-person exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art.      Scott   has been the recipient of many commissions, grants, awards, and honors  from such institutions as the National Endowment for the Arts, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation, Anonymous Was a Woman, American Craft Council, National Living Treasure, Women’s Caucus for the Arts, The National Academy of Design, The Baker Award, MacArthur Foundation Fellowship Award, New York University Fellowship Award, and the Smithsonian Visionary Artist Award. Scott explores challenging subjects, powerfully revealing the equality between materials and practices often associated with “craft” and “fine art.”   She currently lives and works in Baltimore, Maryland, and is represented by Goya Contemporary Gallery.

Recovery Hub for American Women Writers Debut Project Call

Recovery Hub for American Women Writers

Call for Pilot Projects–Eligible for Consultation, Cultivation, and Peer Review


The Recovery Hub for American Women Writers supports projects recovering the work of women writers by providing digital access to forgotten or neglected texts and/or extending them with network mapping, spatial analysis, multimedia storytelling, innovative contextualization, and the distant reading of massive datasets. The Recovery Hub explores the intersecting relationships between feminist practice, content, and technical specifications with an awareness of the ways that the design and implementation of technology can exclude and objectify people. Though there are notable exceptions, the digital humanities is not often geared in content or design toward addressing, attracting, or educating women or people of color. Committed to cultivating a community of diverse scholars as well as inclusive project content, the Hub’s Advisory Board aims for at least 50% of its affiliated projects to recover Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian, and LGBTQIA+ stories, texts, experiences, and voices. The Hub is a mechanism for pooled funding bids and offers hands-on consultation to navigate project management, quality control, sustainability, and peer review in order to increase the quantity and quality of recovery projects focused on American women writers. The Hub fosters collaboration, mentorship, and community-building among women working in the digital humanities while seeking feminist and decolonial approaches to the creation, curation, design, sharing, and archiving of digital content. Read the Recovery Hub for American Women Writers full Mission Statement.

The Recovery Hub has undergone a year of planning, and we are now seeking volunteers who would like to pilot our services. We are currently hiring consultants and plan to begin offering consultation in May 2021. Because we will assess our process and methods during this pilot phase, all participants will be asked to provide feedback on their experiences with the Recovery Hub.

Serving as a Consultant 

Apply Now

Join a network of consultants, built of researchers, educators, technicians, librarians, and community leaders with a variety of skills and experiences who are interested and invested in the recovery of the works of women writers using digital methods. This network can help those working on new and growing digital projects engage in the recovery of women’s writing. Consultants will advise projects members on what technologies can be explored and will lead them to information, resources, and methods. Consultants will have a general familiarity with the digital humanities, experience with current tools and methods, and an awareness of projects that can serve as models. Consultants will commit to working with the Hub for one year and be paid $25 per hour of consultation. Consultants will be compensated for undergoing webinar training, as well. They should expect to support a wide range of projects that approach the Recovery Hub each year and participate in monthly meetings with Recovery Hub staff. 

Seeking Sustained Support through Project Cultivation

Apply Now

Each year The Recovery Hub for American Women Writers will provide significant support for two digital projects in their early phases. Project cultivation can range from guidance through the process of textually encoding a small edition to more in-depth support, including but not limited to creating a project charter, formulating a research design, learning new technologies, searching for funding, and hosting on the Hub’s servers. Projects eligible for support include digital editions of letters, books, short fiction, and other texts as well as experimental projects that explore mapping, visualization, and other content-rich methods. The Hub’s editorial platform is designed to support scholars who want to encode their recovered documents using the best technical and sustainability standards but who have limited experience with the digital humanities. For examples of the range in project types and sizes the Hub supports, see Alex W. Black, Brigitte Fielder, and Johanna Ortner’s Just Teach One: Early African American Print edition of Frances Ellen Watkins (Harper)’s Forest Leaves, Kevin Mcmullen’s Fanny Fern in the New York Ledger, or Jordan Von Cannon’s Transatlantic Departures: Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Travel’s Abroad.

Project cultivation support is available for researchers at any rank, with or without institutional affiliations. Recovery practitioners who are awarded project cultivation will also receive a $2,000 stipend to support their work on the project during the Hub’s pilot phase. Practitioners are expected to dedicate at least 80 hours of work to the project throughout the course of the year and attend meetings and training with the Hub’s staff. Complete the application no later than March 15, 2021, to have your project considered for pilot cultivation beginning April 1.

Requesting Peer Review

Request Now

The Recovery Hub for American Women Writers peer reviews digital projects at various stages of completion. Projects are publicized by SSAWW, reviewed in Legacy, and included in a twice-yearly showcase on the Hub website. Peer-reviewed projects will also be featured in a pedagogical forum where educators at the K-12 and college level can access professionally produced teaching materials, including assignments, video interviews, and examples of student work. The Hub’s peer review process is grounded in feminist practice; reviewers use an open model that emphasizes one-on-one mentorship and encourages project directors to build upon and cite the work of other feminists. The Hub also values the iterative nature of digital projects by offering in-process peer review even at a project’s earliest stages. An article outlining the results of peer review will be published on the website with each project to model best practices and demonstrate the value of digital recovery work. Submit requests to be included in the pilot peer review process no later than March 15, 2021.

If you have questions, reply to recoveryhub@siue.edu

Call for Reviewers: 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference (accepting volunteers until 1.31.2021)

Call for Reviewers for the 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference in Baltimore

Plans are now well underway for the Society for the Study of American Women Writers Triennial conference on the theme of ecologies, survival, and change. In preparation, we are now asking for volunteers to serve as reviewers for the proposals that we receive for individual paper, panel, and roundtable presentations. The deadline for submissions is February 1, 2021, so reviewers can expect to receive proposals for evaluation no later than two weeks after the submission deadline with a three-week turnaround time (in late February and possibly into March).

Please contact Dr. Sara Kosiba, Conference Associate for the 2021 conference at ssaww.conferences@gmail.com if you are willing to help in this important process. We will accept volunteers until January 31st. Provide 1) your areas of expertise, 2) your position (faculty, independent scholars, and advanced graduate students are welcome to participate), and 3) your most reliable email contact information. As always, our goal is to keep the number of proposals for each reader manageable (fifteen at most), so your consideration and valuable service to SSAWW is most appreciated. Selected reviewers will receive a letter of appreciation in response and inclusion in the acknowledgments section of our final conference program.

Note that submitting proposals of your own does not preclude participation in the vetting process since we will ensure that conflicts are avoided when assigning proposals for review.

CFP: 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference (Deadline: 2.1.2021)

CFP: 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference “American Women Writers: Ecologies, Survival, Change”

November 4-7th, 2021 Baltimore, Maryland

For the 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference in Baltimore, we invite proposals on the topic of “American Women Writers: Ecologies, Survival, Change.”

Proposals are welcome on subjects from early American literature to the literature of the present. Proposals might engage with these topics but are not limited to them:

I. Studies of Writing that

  • Examines the systems in which we live, labor, and love
  • Fosters survival and envisions change
  • Illuminates crises that make the ecologies that constitute our worlds visible or hyper-visible
  • Represents existing ecologies and imagines alternative ecologies
  • Brings together metaphors of disease, national peril, and anti-immigration, especially 19th and 21st century writing by women
  • Resists nativist discourses of contagion and national peril, especially 19th- and 21st century by immigrant women
  • Represents systemic barriers to social justice and routes to achieving it
    • Envisions intersectionality as forms of ecology
    • Exposes systemic gender inequities
    • Connects racism and racial and gender bias to physical and cultural health issues
  • Highlights memoir and letters as expressions of relationships between individual lives
  • Explores the role of writing in emotional recovery from systemic oppression and/or illness
  • Addresses women’s engagement with ecologies of print culture and beyond: periodicals, newspapers, magazines, pamphlets, books, the internet, etc.
    • Opposes epistemicide
    • Explores ecologies of the archive: what is accessible, sustained, recreated, generated, perpetuated, and/or perpetrated in archival and recovery processes; where do women writers live, survive, and thrive?

II. Proposals on Teaching and Pedagogy that

  • explore the ecologies of academic institutions and the role of women scholars within (and against) them)
  • address literary canons as ecologies and propose healthier, more diverse ecologies of literature and literary study
  • model ways to by-pass anachronistic approaches and create new lenses for student research/scholarly production, etc.
  • move beyond academic monocultures by engaging the intersections of art, music, literature, etc. for a more interdisciplinary approach
  • examine the predominant methodologies of discrete historical eras and their presence in the work of women writers and artists

III. Public Humanities

  • Performance
  • Scholarship as social engagement
  • Teaching outside of the academic classroom
  • Creating partnerships for public humanities by bridging the university and the public sphere

IV. Pedagogies and Scholarship in the Digital Era

  • Surviving and thriving pedagogically in the digital era
  • Teaching via distanced learning
  • Using digital tools, assignments, and projects in the classroom
  • Adapting to the move to online curricula
  • Showcasing research projects and student work in digital modes
  • Devising models of resistance, politics, and economic compensation in the digital age
  • Shepherding projects from initial idea stage to fully-formed digital works

V. Digital Humanities

  • Building and sustaining DH projects from grant funding to long-term sustainability
  • Creating networks for digital projects beyond the university
  • Developing the relationship between recovery work and digital platforms
  • Making it count: how to construct a digital portfolio for research and promotion

VI. Professional Development

  • Professional challenges within universities or the discipline (e.g., how to “count” digital work toward promotion and tenure, reconsidering the value of edited volumes, etc.)
  • From PhD candidate to colleague: demystifying the academic job market
  • The non-academic job search and the role of humanities outside th academy
  • From proposal and beyond: understanding academic publishing in the twenty-first century

Please send your submissions as PDFs to ssaww.conferences@gmail.com

Deadline: February 1, 2021

Individual paper proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative paper title as well as a proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words.

Pre-formed panel proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative panel title and contact information for the session chair. In addition, we will need a tentative title and a brief proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words for each participant. Note that panels typically consist of three, but no more than four, presenters who are each allotted between fifteen and twenty minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

Pre-formed roundtable proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative roundtable title and the contact information for the session chair. In addition, we will need a title and brief proposal of approximately 150 to 250 words for each participant. Note that roundtables typically consist of five to six participants allocated around six to eight minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

Workshop and exhibition proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative session title as well as a brief workshop/exhibition overview of approximately 150 to 250 words. There is an optional section devoted to additional session information to provide space and time considerations, contact information for additional contributors, etc.

Special sessions (for SSAWW affiliate organizations): SSAWW affiliate organizations will be asked to provide a tentative panel title and contact information of the session chair. In addition, we will need a tentative title and a brief proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words for each participant. Note that panels typically consist of three presenters allotted fifteen to twenty minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

For any special sessions (such as a syllabus/assignment exchange, film screening, etc.) that does not follow this format, please contact Dr. Ellen Gruber Garvey directly at ssaww.conferences@gmail.com with a query.

For complete sessions, please ensure that notifications are sent to potential participants by early January at the latest to allow those whose proposals are not accepted for the panel or roundtable to submit individual paper proposals by the submission deadline of February 1, 2021. Chairs will be asked to provide an abstract for the panel as a whole (approximately 250 to 300 words) as well as the contact information and a brief biographical statement (no longer than 60 words) for each participant, each individual abstract, and any A/V requirements (please note that while we do recognize the need for support for some presentations, there are always high costs associated with securing this equipment that we would like to limit).

Participants are allowed to appear on the final program no more than twice in an effort to allow as many individuals as possible the opportunity to participate. Participants will be listed in the program if they are presenting a paper, participating in a roundtable or workshop, or serving as the chair for a session. Participating in two different roles in the same session (e.g., as the chair and a panelist) would therefore count as two listings in the program. Please note that it is not permissible to present on two panels, though individuals can present as part of a panel and a roundtable session.

For help regarding any technical issues with submitting proposals or questions about the participation guidelines, please contact Dr. Sara Kosiba, Conference Associate for the 2021 conference, at ssaww.conferences@gmail.com; she is also the contact person for scheduling, A/V requests, etc.

For questions regarding the conference itself, please contact the Vice President of Organizational Matters, Dr. Maria Sanchez via E-mail at ssaww.vporganizationalmatters@gmail.com

Note that selected participants must be members of SSAWW no later than June 1, 2021 in order to secure their place on the conference program.

We look forward to receiving proposals for the many thoughtful and informative sessions that our SSAWW members always produce and to seeing you in Baltimore for yet another powerful SSAWW Triennial Conference.

For conference updates and additional information about the Society for the Study of American Women Writers, please visit the 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference tab on our main menu

CFP: 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference (EXTENDED Deadline: 3.8.2021)

CFP: 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference “American Women Writers: Ecologies, Survival, Change”

November 4-7th, 2021 Baltimore, Maryland

For the 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference in Baltimore, we invite proposals on the topic of “American Women Writers: Ecologies, Survival, Change.”

Proposals are welcome on subjects from early American literature to the literature of the present. Proposals might engage with these topics but are not limited to them:

I. Studies of Writing that

  • Examines the systems in which we live, labor, and love
  • Fosters survival and envisions change
  • Illuminates crises that make the ecologies that constitute our worlds visible or hyper-visible
  • Represents existing ecologies and imagines alternative ecologies
  • Brings together metaphors of disease, national peril, and anti-immigration, especially 19th and 21st century writing by women
  • Resists nativist discourses of contagion and national peril, especially 19th- and 21st century by immigrant women
  • Represents systemic barriers to social justice and routes to achieving it
    • Envisions intersectionality as forms of ecology
    • Exposes systemic gender inequities
    • Connects racism and racial and gender bias to physical and cultural health issues
  • Highlights memoir and letters as expressions of relationships between individual lives
  • Explores the role of writing in emotional recovery from systemic oppression and/or illness
  • Addresses women’s engagement with ecologies of print culture and beyond: periodicals, newspapers, magazines, pamphlets, books, the internet, etc.
    • Opposes epistemicide
    • Explores ecologies of the archive: what is accessible, sustained, recreated, generated, perpetuated, and/or perpetrated in archival and recovery processes; where do women writers live, survive, and thrive?

II. Proposals on Teaching and Pedagogy that

  • explore the ecologies of academic institutions and the role of women scholars within (and against) them)
  • address literary canons as ecologies and propose healthier, more diverse ecologies of literature and literary study
  • model ways to by-pass anachronistic approaches and create new lenses for student research/scholarly production, etc.
  • move beyond academic monocultures by engaging the intersections of art, music, literature, etc. for a more interdisciplinary approach
  • examine the predominant methodologies of discrete historical eras and their presence in the work of women writers and artists

III. Public Humanities

  • Performance
  • Scholarship as social engagement
  • Teaching outside of the academic classroom
  • Creating partnerships for public humanities by bridging the university and the public sphere

IV. Pedagogies and Scholarship in the Digital Era

  • Surviving and thriving pedagogically in the digital era
  • Teaching via distanced learning
  • Using digital tools, assignments, and projects in the classroom
  • Adapting to the move to online curricula
  • Showcasing research projects and student work in digital modes
  • Devising models of resistance, politics, and economic compensation in the digital age
  • Shepherding projects from initial idea stage to fully-formed digital works

V. Digital Humanities

  • Building and sustaining DH projects from grant funding to long-term sustainability
  • Creating networks for digital projects beyond the university
  • Developing the relationship between recovery work and digital platforms
  • Making it count: how to construct a digital portfolio for research and promotion

VI. Professional Development

  • Professional challenges within universities or the discipline (e.g., how to “count” digital work toward promotion and tenure, reconsidering the value of edited volumes, etc.)
  • From PhD candidate to colleague: demystifying the academic job market
  • The non-academic job search and the role of humanities outside th academy
  • From proposal and beyond: understanding academic publishing in the twenty-first century

Please send your submissions as PDFs to ssaww.conferences@gmail.com

Deadline: March 8, 2021

Individual paper proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative paper title as well as a proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words.

Pre-formed panel proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative panel title and contact information for the session chair. In addition, we will need a tentative title and a brief proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words for each participant. Note that panels typically consist of three, but no more than four, presenters who are each allotted between fifteen and twenty minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

Pre-formed roundtable proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative roundtable title and the contact information for the session chair. In addition, we will need a title and brief proposal of approximately 150 to 250 words for each participant. Note that roundtables typically consist of five to six participants allocated around six to eight minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

Workshop and exhibition proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative session title as well as a brief workshop/exhibition overview of approximately 150 to 250 words. There is an optional section devoted to additional session information to provide space and time considerations, contact information for additional contributors, etc.

Special sessions (for SSAWW affiliate organizations): SSAWW affiliate organizations will be asked to provide a tentative panel title and contact information of the session chair. In addition, we will need a tentative title and a brief proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words for each participant. Note that panels typically consist of three presenters allotted fifteen to twenty minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

For any special sessions (such as a syllabus/assignment exchange, film screening, etc.) that does not follow this format, please contact Dr. Ellen Gruber Garvey directly at ssaww.conferences@gmail.com with a query.

For complete sessions, please ensure that notifications are sent to potential participants by early January at the latest to allow those whose proposals are not accepted for the panel or roundtable to submit individual paper proposals by the submission deadline of February 22, 2021. Chairs will be asked to provide an abstract for the panel as a whole (approximately 250 to 300 words) as well as the contact information and a brief biographical statement (no longer than 60 words) for each participant, each individual abstract, and any A/V requirements (please note that while we do recognize the need for support for some presentations, there are always high costs associated with securing this equipment that we would like to limit).

Participants are allowed to appear on the final program no more than twice in an effort to allow as many individuals as possible the opportunity to participate. Participants will be listed in the program if they are presenting a paper, participating in a roundtable or workshop, or serving as the chair for a session. Participating in two different roles in the same session (e.g., as the chair and a panelist) would therefore count as two listings in the program. Please note that it is not permissible to present on two panels, though individuals can present as part of a panel and a roundtable session.

For help regarding any technical issues with submitting proposals or questions about the participation guidelines, please contact Dr. Sara Kosiba, Conference Associate for the 2021 conference, at ssaww.conferences@gmail.com; she is also the contact person for scheduling, A/V requests, etc.

For questions regarding the conference itself, please contact the Vice President of Organizational Matters, Dr. Maria Sanchez via E-mail at ssaww.vporganizationalmatters@gmail.com

Note that selected participants must be members of SSAWW no later than June 1, 2021 in order to secure their place on the conference program.

We look forward to receiving proposals for the many thoughtful and informative sessions that our SSAWW members always produce and to seeing you in Baltimore for yet another powerful SSAWW Triennial Conference.

For conference updates and additional information about the Society for the Study of American Women Writers, please visit the 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference tab on our main menu