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CFP: Feminist Pedagogy in Digital Spaces: An Electronic Roundtable (Deadline 3.10.17)

CFP: Feminist Pedagogy in Digital Spaces: An Electronic Roundtable

Organized by the Committee on the Status of Women in the Profession

MLA Convention, New York City, January 4-7, 2018 (proposals due March 10)

Digital spaces present a number of challenges to feminist discourses: platforms such as Twitter suffer from design affordances that amplify trolling and harassment, unmoderated online forums can easily become havens for misogynist discourse, and being visible as a woman online is associated with sexual harassment and continual microaggressions. The recent election and its aftermath have particularly brought attention to the discursive challenges faced in the context of charged, intersectional, feminist debate. However, digital spaces are increasingly sites of learning, from massively online courses to online and mixed mode learning conducted in learning management systems such as Blackboard and Canvas. We will examine methods for integrating feminist discourse into digital pedagogy while considering the challenges of accessibility and inclusion.

This roundtable intersects with previous conversations surrounding digital pedagogy at the MLA, but makes explicit the challenges that traditional digital humanities assumptions present for marginalized voices and feminist discourse. As a digital roundtable, this session will include a short overview with interactive digital display stations for each participant to engage with small groups in dialogue throughout the event. We invite proposals of 250-300 words addressing:

  • Tools and strategies for creating intersectional feminist spaces within existing learning management systems

  • Successful (and unsuccessful!) uses of technology in literature and writing curriculum

  • Digital projects (such as games and web resources) designed to support intersectional feminist pedagogy

  • Social media-based experiments or exercises designed for deployment in the literature or writing classroom

  • Products and methods for critical making as part of intersectional feminist pedagogy

Presenters should include specific information on what they plan to share as part of their digital display. Please email your submissions to anastasia.salter@gmail.com and scordell@umich.edu by March 10th.

Sigrid Anderson Cordell, Ph.D. | Librarian for English Language and Literature and Lecturer in American Culture | University of Michigan |

CFP: Callaloo Special Issue (Deadline 08.01.2017)

Callaloo invites papers for a special issue devoted to the life and work of the late poet, fiction writer, playwright, and scholar, Sherley Anne Williams, guest edited by Wendy W. Walters (Emerson College).

Project Description:
Sherley Anne Williams was a talented author/scholar, publishing in many genres. Her novel, Dessa Rose,preceded Toni Morrison’s Beloved by one year and has been read as an inaugural example of the neo-slave narrative genre. Her short fiction is anthologized in multiple collections. Williams’ first book of poetry, The Peacock Poems (Wesleyan 1975), was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award. Her second poetry book, Some One Sweet Angel Chile (William Morrow 1982) was also nominated for a National Book Award, and she received an Emmy Award for a televised performance of these poems. Her prose poem, “Letters from a New England Negro,” published in Iowa Review, became a one-woman drama, which was performed at several important theatre festivals. A theatrical version of Williams’s novel, Dessa Rose, was performed as an off-Broadway musical in 2005. She also published two children’s books in the 1990s.Working Cotton received both a Caldecott Award and a Coretta Scott King Book Award. Her second children’s book, Girls Together, was published in 1999.

As Mae Henderson wrote in her memorial tribute in Callaloo, “her achievements betoken the legacy this generation will pass on to its survivors. Our community is a poorer place without Sherley Anne Williams; our inheritance, a richer one because of her song:

These is old blues
and I sing em like any woman do.
These is old blues
and I sing em, sing em, sing em. Just like any woman do.
My life ain’t done yet
Naw. My song ain’t through.”

New essays on any aspect of Sherley Anne Williams’ writing are sought, from a variety of critical and interpretive perspectives. Specific topics and themes may include, but are not limited to:

–       blues idioms; language; orality; music
–       gender studies; black womanist theory
–       depictions of nature; ecocritical readings
–       sexuality and the erotic
–       dramatic collaborations; adaptation of poetry to stage/screen
–       Working Cotton, and Girls Together, and multicultural children’s literature
–       working class literature; agricultural labor
–       reconsidering the neoslave narrative; historical/archival revision
–       Williams’s influences; intertextuality
–       sisterhood; family bonds
–       geography; migration; diaspora
–       critical race theory

Callaloo Submission Guidelines:
Manuscripts must be submitted online through the Callaloo manuscript submission system by August 1, 2017. Please see the submission guidelines here:
http://callaloo.expressacademic.org/login.php. In order to submit a manuscript, you must register with the online system. The registration process will only take a few minutes. All manuscripts will follow the usual review process for submissions, and the Callaloo editor makes all final editorial decisions. Please note all manuscripts must follow the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (3rd Edition) and include in-text citations, a works cited, and endnotes for any commentary.

Guest Editor:
Wendy W. Walters is a Professor in the department of Writing, Literature, and Publishing, at Emerson College, Boston, teaching courses in African American and African diaspora literature and culture. She is the author of two books, Archives of the Black Atlantic: Reading Between Literature and History (Routledge, March 2013), and At Home in Diaspora: Black International Literature (U of Minnesota, 2005). She has also published articles in Callaloo, American Literature, African American Review, Novel, and MELUS.

CFP: 2018 Margaret Fuller Society MLA panel (due March 20)

Call for Papers for the 2018 Margaret Fuller Society panel at the Modern Language Association convention, January 4-7, 2018 in New York City:  MARGARET FULLER: NEW CRITICAL APPROACHES.  Such as: Gender fluidity; Queer Theory; Environmental Criticism; Affect and Public Feeling; Transnational mobility; Critical Race Studies; New Feminist Materialism; the New Aesthetics.  250-500 word abstract and short vita by March 20, 2017 to Jeffrey Steele, jsteele@wisc.edu.  Inquiries welcome.

CFP: Migration, Diaspora, Circulation, and Translation, due Feb 15, 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS

Migration, Diaspora, Circulation and Translation 

October 5-7, 2017

University College Dublin, Clinton Institute for American Studies

Dublin, Ireland

A conference sponsored by the Charles Brockden Brown Society

(www.brockdenbrownsociety.ucf.edu)

 

Our conference site in Dublin calls to mind issues of migration, immigration, emigration, colonization, revolution, and other changes that result from the movement of people, ideas, and things from one place to another. Such issues were significant in colonial and early national American writing and thought in the long eighteenth century. The current global migration crisis and the recent “Brexit” vote makes these topics timely for reappraisal: as millions of migrants and asylum seekers cross into Europe, the world confronts questions about borders, resources, community, poverty, wealth, understanding of cultural differences, and human rights. The Eleventh Biennial Conference of the Charles Brockden Brown Society invites papers on all aspects of diaspora, migration, circulation, and translation in the long eighteenth century. The following list offers some examples of suggested topics:

 

Texts (letters, periodicals, books, treatises) that migrate from one place to another

Migration of species, and theories of natural history that involve migration or hibernation

Spread of genetic material in plants or other living beings; ecological biology, biodiversity, monoculture or related concepts

Movement of food, drink and other cultural practices related to agriculture, food preparation and/or eating

Loss inherent in places from which migration takes place on a large scale

Changing boundaries of nations, places, concepts (gender, childhood, etc.) during the long eighteenth century

Colonial and/or imperial repercussions of migration

Representations of Irishness as an unstable category in the long eighteenth century

Maria Edgeworth’s influence on American texts

Literary hoaxes and their reliance on dissemination

Ways that “contagion” works differently than “diaspora” as a trope

Adaptations, literary influences, allusions, plagiarism, copyright issues

Charles Brockden Brown’s depiction of migration, circulation, translation

Migratory labor, including prisoners, apprentices, and chattel slaves

The effects of borders and border crossing in domestic (national and private) spaces

Although we are an author society, we solicit proposals from a broad range of texts and practices beyond those associated with Brown and his writings alone. We also encourage interdisciplinary scholarship and work emphasizing non-U.S. literatures. Our conference culture aims to create a space of egalitarian consideration free from career-oriented and competitive attitudes, a place for new work to blossom. In this light, we have no concurrent sessions, so that all may be heard by all. Because of time/space constraints, we may ask you to reframe your proposed talk as a brief (5-10 minute) presentation for inclusion within a roundtable format.

Travel Support for Graduate Students: 

Two travel awards of $500 each for graduate student participation will be awarded, funded by the Brown Society. Criteria for these travel subventions will favor students at the dissertation stage (over those in earlier stages of degree work) and those who have not previously presented at a CBBS meeting. Graduate students applying for a subvention should indicate their interest in a cover letter and provide information about whether or not they are ABD.

 

250-word proposal deadline: February 15, 2017  Please send a proposal in .docx format to hewitt.33@osu.edu.

CFP Final Call: Catharine Sedgwick Society at ALA (Deadline 1.15.17)

As we head toward the 150th anniversary of Catharine Sedgwick’s death and the 20th anniversary of the CMS Society in 2017, we invite proposals for the following panel for ALA 2017:

Session #1: TIME, MEMORIALS AND ANNIVERSARIES (3 or 4 15 to 20-minute papers):

How is “time” referenced in Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s writings? Does her sense of time seem consistent at moments with Wordsworth’s “spots of time”? Is there more that can be said about her “anachronistic imaginings,” to take a phrase from Jeffrey Insko’s 2004 essay, “Anachronistic Imaginings: Hope Leslie’s Challenge to Historicism?” What about her attention to memory, memorials, and monuments, and how space and visual culture relate to notions of time? What about anniversaries, rituals and annual or seasonal celebrations? This panel invites proposals on these and other issues related to the perception of time, the passage of time, and the celebration of times past in Sedgwick’s writings or the writings of her contemporaries.

I want to remind readers that the Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society is holding its 8th symposium in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, June 7-10, 2017, celebrating both the 150th anniversary of Sedgwick’s death and the 20th anniversary of the CMS Society. The focus for the symposium is “Where and When: Evolving Concepts of Place, Space, and Time in the Writings of Sedgwick and Her Contemporaries.” There is potential to have meaningful overlap between the May ALA panel and the June symposium. The Society asks that participants do not deliver exactly the same paper at both events but encourages work that connects papers between the different forums or initiates an ongoing conversation.

ALA will be held May 25-28, 2017 (Thursday to Sunday of Memorial Day weekend) at Westin Copley Place in Boston, MA.

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: January 15, 2017

Please send abstracts to Lisa West, V.P. for External Conferences, CMS Society: lisa.west@drake.edu

CFP: Rebecca Harding Davis at ALA 2017 (Deadline 1.20.17)

The Society for the Study of Rebecca Harding Davis and Her World welcomes proposals for two sessions at the next meeting of the American Literature Association. The conference will be held May 25-28, 2017 in Boston, MA.  For further information about the conference, please consult the ALA website at www.americanliterature.org.

1.   Joint Session with the Louisa May Alcott Society:  Rebecca Harding Davis (1831-1910) and Louisa May Alcott (1832 – 1888) witnessed dramatic changes in American culture throughout their lifetimes.  As authors, they explored a variety of genres, including realist fiction (often oriented toward reform), gothic fiction, children’s literature, essays, and journalism.  Both women viewed aspects of the Civil War firsthand, were troubled by the effects of industrialization and the factory system, critiqued the position of women in nineteenth-century culture and advocated for women’s rights.  They also at times examined the tension between philosophical ideals and the pragmatic demands of daily life.  Both women experienced the vicissitudes of publication, recognition, and careers in authorship. Davis and Alcott met during a visit Davis made to Concord in 1862.  About this meeting, Alcott wrote in her Journal for May 1862 “Saw Miss Rebecca Harding, author of ‘Margaret Howth,’which has made quite a stir, and is very good. A handsome, fresh, quiet woman, who says she never has any troubles, though she writes about woes.  I told her I had had lots of troubles; so I write jolly tales; and we wondered why we each did so.” 
The two authors encountered each other again years later, and Davis recorded their meeting in Bits of Gossip (1904):
Years afterward she came to the city where I was living and I hurried to meet her.  The lean, eager, defiant girl was gone, and instead, there came to greet me a large, portly, middle-aged woman, richly dressed.  Everything about her, from her shrewd, calm eyes to the rustle of her satin gown told of assured success.
Yet I am sure fame and success counted for nothing with her except for the material aid which they enabled her to give to a few men and women whom she loved. . . . Louisa Alcott wrote books which were true and fine, but she never imagined a life as noble as her own.

To explore the connections between these two significant 19th-century women’s voices in greater depth, the Rebecca Harding Davis Society and the Louisa May Alcott Society will offer a joint panel at the American Literature Association in May 2017.  We invite papers that examine how Alcott and Davis treat or respond to any of the issues mentioned in the opening paragraph.
Send brief abstracts by January 20, 2017 to Mischa Renfroe (Mischa.Renfroe@mtsu.edu) and Melissa Pennell (Melissa_Pennell@uml.edu
2.  Open Topic Session:   We welcome proposals that engage any aspect of Davis’s work and are especially interested in new readings of neglected texts.  Presenters must be members of the Society for the Study of Rebecca Harding Davis and Her World.  For information about joining the society, please visit our website athttp://scotus.francis.edu/rebeccahardingdavis/  
Deadline: January 20, 2017
Please send a 200-250 word abstract to :
Mischa Renfroe
Middle Tennessee State University
and                              

 

Call for Reviewers: SSAWW Panels at the American Literature Association

Call for Reviewers: SSAWW Panels at the American Literature Association

 

The Society for the Study of American Women Writers will be presenting two panels at the 2017 American Literature Association Conference in Boston, MA. The theme for our panels this year will be activism and resistance in American women’s writing from early America to the present day. In preparation for this always exciting conference—another great opportunity to promote and advance the study of American women writers—we are asking for volunteers to serve as reviewers for the proposals that we receive. The deadline for submission of proposals is January 15, 2017, so reviewers can expect to receive proposals for evaluation no later than January 17 with a turnaround no later than January 27 in order to allot sufficient time to form our panels, contact participants, and submit materials to the ALA conference organizers.

 

Please contact Christopher Allen Varlack directly at cvarlack@umbc.edu if you are willing to help with this important process, providing 1) your areas of expertise, 2) your academic rank/institution (independent scholars and advanced graduate students are most welcome to participate), and 3) your contact information. We would like to thank you for your consideration and valuable service to SSAWW. Selected reviewers will receive a letter of appreciation in response and can include their service as part of their CVs.

 

Best,

The SSAWW Executive Committee