New Books: Chicago and the Main of American Modernism

Author: Michelle E. Moore

Chicago and the Making of American Modernism: Cather, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Fitzgerald in Conflict

Bloomsbury Academic, 2018

 

 

Chicago and the Making of American Modernism is the first full-length study of the vexed relationship between America’s great modernist writers and the nation’s “second city.” Michelle E. Moore explores the ways in which the defining writers of the era-Willa Cather, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner and F. Scott Fitzgerald-engaged with the city and reacted against the commercial styles of “Chicago realism” to pursue their own, European-influenced mode of modernist art. Drawing on local archives to illuminate the literary culture of early 20th-century Chicago, this book reveals an important new dimension to the rise of American modernism.

The book contains chapters that reexamine the creation of the Little Room and explores Elia Peattie’s relationship to young Willa Cather. Chapter two tells the story of Harriet Monroe’s fight to create the “Columbian Ode.” It reveals Monroe’s battle to obtain and protect her copyright based on new archival evidence and contextualizes the fight against the backdrop of Chicago history.

Available in print and digital formats: https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/chicago-and-the-making-of-american-modernism-9781350018037/

 

New Books: Liminality, Hybridity, and American Women’s Literature Thresholds in Women’s Writing (2015 SSAWW Conference)

Editors:  Kristin J. Jacobson, Kristin Allukian,  Rickie-Anne Legleitner, and Leslie Allison

Liminality, Hyrbridity, & American Women’s Literature: Thresholds in Women’s Writing

Palgrave Macmillan, 2018

 

 

This book is available in print and digital formats: https://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9783319738505#aboutBook

This collection grows out of the 2015 SSAWW Conference and is dedicated to the Society for the Study of American Women Writers and conference organizers, Rita Bode, Dick Ellis, Beth Lueck, Miranda Green-Barteet, Leslie Allison, and Rickie-Ann Legleitner.

This book highlights the multiplicity of American women’s writing related to liminality and hybridity from its beginnings to the contemporary moment. Often informed by notions of crossing, intersectionality, transition, and transformation, these concepts as they appear in American women’s writing contest as well as perpetuate exclusionary practices involving class, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, and sex, among other variables. The collection’s introduction, three unit introductions, fourteen individual essays, and afterward facilitate a process of encounters, engagements, and conversations within, between, among, and across the rich polyphony that constitutes the creative acts of American women writers. The contributors offer fresh perspectives on canonical writers as well as introduce readers to new authors. As a whole, the collection demonstrates American women’s writing is “threshold writing,” or writing that occupies a liminal, hybrid space that both delimits borders and offers enticing openings.

New Books: Iola Leroy, edited by Koritha Mitchell

Edited by: Koritha Mitchell

Novel by Frances E. W. Harper

Iola Leroy; or Shadows Uplifted

Broadview Press, 2018

This book is available in print and digital formats: https://broadviewpress.com/product/iola-leroy/#tab-description

Frances Harper’s fourth novel follows the life of the beautiful, light-skinned Iola Leroy to tell the story of black families in slavery, during the Civil War, and after Emancipation. Iola Leroy adopts and adapts three genres that commanded significant audiences in the nineteenth century: the sentimental romance, the slave narrative, and plantation fiction. Written by the foremost black woman activist of the nineteenth century, the novel sheds light on the movements for abolition, public education, and voting rights through a compelling narrative.

This edition engages the latest research on Harper’s life and work and offers ways to teach these major moments in United States history by centering the experiences of African Americans. The appendices provide primary documents that help readers do what they are seldom encouraged to do: consider the experiences and perspectives of people who are not white. The Introduction traces Harper’s biography and the changing critical perspectives on the novel. (Description from Broadview Press)

New Books: Migrating Fictions: Gender, Race, and Citizenship in U.S. Internal Displacements by Abigail G. H. Manzella

Abigail G. H. Manzella

Migrating Fictions: Gender, Race, and Citizenship in U.S. Internal Displacements

The Ohio State University Press, 2018.

The book is available in hardback, paper, and digital editions: https://ohiostatepress.org/books/titles/9780814213582.html

Migrating Fictions analyzes the role of race, gender, and citizenship in the major internal displacements of the twentieth century in history and in narrative. Surveying the particular tactics employed by the United States during the Great Migration, the Dust Bowl, the Japanese American incarceration, and the migrant labor of the Southwest, Abigail G. H. Manzella reveals how the country’s past is imbued with governmentally (en)forced movements that diminished access to full citizenship rights for the laboring class, people of color, and women.

This work is the first book-length study to examine all of these movements together along with their literature, including Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, Sanora Babb’s Whose Names Are Unknown, Julie Otsuka’s When the Emperor Was Divine, Helena María Viramontes’s Under the Feet of Jesus, and Jesmyn Ward’s Salvage the Bones. Manzella shows how the United States’ history of spatial colonization within its own borders extends beyond isolated incidents into a pattern based on ideology about nation-building, citizenship, and labor. This book seeks to theorize a Thirdspace, an alternate location for social justice that acknowledges the precarity of the internally displaced person.

New Books: Learning Legacies: Archive to Action through Women’s Cross-Cultural Teaching by Sarah Robbins

Robbins, Sarah Ruffing. Learning Legacies: Archive to Action through Women’s Cross-Cultural Teaching.

University of Michigan Press, 2017.

The book is available in hardback, paper, and digital editions:

Learning Legacies spotlights women writer-educators of the past whose stories can inspire community building today. One chapter highlights work by African American teachers and students from Spelman College. Another revisits settlement house collaborative learning in urban Chicago. Robbins also honors Native women educators’ nurturing models. Overall, Learning Legacies  shows readers women’s leadership in American education and in writing about that vital work.​

New Books: The Altar at Home: Sentimental Literature and Nineteenth-Century American Religion by Claudia Stokes

stokesThe Altar at Home: Sentimental Literature and Nineteenth-Century American Religion
Claudia Stokes

http://www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/15292.html

View table of contents

“Claudia Stokes presents a more textured account and provocatively mixed assessment of the sentimental tradition of American women’s letters than we have yet encountered.”—Tracy Fessenden, Arizona State University

“This is an excellent book—well researched, innovative, and beautifully written. Claudia Stokes shows a mastery of both literary sentimentalism and religious history, which she uses to bring out compelling new insights about what it meant for women to draw on sentimental codes as they forged new ways of participating in religious culture and public discussions.”—Nancy Bentley, University of Pennsylvania

Displays of devout religious faith are very much in evidence in nineteenth-century sentimental novels such as Uncle Tom’s Cabin and Little Women, but the precise theological nature of this piety has been little examined. In the first dedicated study of the religious contents of sentimental literature, Claudia Stokes counters the long-standing characterization of sentimental piety as blandly nondescript and demonstrates that these works were in fact groundbreaking, assertive, and highly specific in their theological recommendations and endorsements. The Altar at Home explores the many religious contexts and contents of sentimental literature of the American nineteenth century, from the growth of Methodism in the Second Great Awakening and popular millennialism to the developing theologies of Mormonism and Christian Science.

New Books: Thinking Outside the Book by Augusta Rohrbach

rohrbach

Thinking Outside the Book
AUGUSTA ROHRBACH
http://www.umass.edu/umpress/title/thinking-outside-book

In Thinking Outside the Book, Augusta Rohrbach works through the increasing convergences between digital humanities and literary studies to explore the meaning and primacy of the book as a literary, material, and cultural artifact. Rohrbach assembles a rather unlikely cohort of nineteenth-century women writers—Jane Johnston Schoolcraft, Sojourner Truth, Hannah Crafts, Augusta Evans, and Mary Chesnut—to consider the publishing culture of their period from the perspective of our current digital age, bringing together scholarly concepts from both print culture and new media studies.

More than a literary history, this book takes up theories of recovery, literacy, authorship, narrative, the book, and new media in connection with race, gender, class, and region.

“Rohrbach’s readings and archival work demonstrate how valuable the decentering of authorship can be for understanding how racialized and marginalized subjects relate to the literary marketplace, to be sure, but also simply for understanding the networked quality of the marketplace itself in the nineteenth century.”—MATT COHEN, author of The Networked Wilderness: Communicating in Early New England