2021 SSAWW Conference Registration – Now Open

Registration for the 2021 SSAWW Conference is now open!

A draft of the conference program will be available in early June for planning purposes.  In the coming weeks we will also have additional details on hotel reservations and graduate student travel awards. 

Visit our conference page to find out more information about the conference and to register for 2021 SSAWW – https://ssawwnew.wordpress.com/2021-ssaww-triennial-conference/

SSAWW 2021 Keynote Speaker: Dr. Joyce J. Scott

“I’d like my art to induce people to stop raping, torturing, and shooting each other.

I don’t have the ability to end violence, racism, and sexism. But my art can help them look and think.”

—Joyce J. Scott 

MacArthur Fellow, Dr. Joyce J. Scott (b. 1948, Baltimore, MD) is best known for her figurative sculpture and jewelry using bead weaving techniques, as well as blown glass, and found objects.  As an African-American, feminist artist, Scott unapologetically confronts difficult themes as diverse as her subjects which include race, misogyny, sexuality, stereotypes, gender inequality, economic disparity, history, politics, rape, and discrimination. Over the past 50 years,  Scott has also established herself as an innovative fiber artist, print maker, installation artist, vocalist, and  performer.   

Joyce J. Scott  was born to sharecroppers in North Carolina who were descendants of slaves. Her family migrated to Baltimore,  where Joyce was born and raised. She earned her BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art, MFA from the Instituto Allende in Mexico, and was conferred honorary doctorates from both The Maryland Institute College of Art  and California College of the Arts. 

In 2017, Scott and her primary gallery, Goya Contemporary, opened her largest exhibition to date at Grounds For Sculpture in New Jersey.   In addition to historic and recent objects, Scott realized 2 large-scale site-specific works focused on the abolitionist Harriet Tubman, created at the Johnson Atelier.  Other major projects include glassworks made at Berengo Glass Studios on the Italian island of Murano, Italy, which were exhibited in the 2013 Venice Biennale collateral exhibition Glasstress, and a major one-person exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art.      Scott   has been the recipient of many commissions, grants, awards, and honors  from such institutions as the National Endowment for the Arts, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation, Anonymous Was a Woman, American Craft Council, National Living Treasure, Women’s Caucus for the Arts, The National Academy of Design, The Baker Award, MacArthur Foundation Fellowship Award, New York University Fellowship Award, and the Smithsonian Visionary Artist Award. Scott explores challenging subjects, powerfully revealing the equality between materials and practices often associated with “craft” and “fine art.”   She currently lives and works in Baltimore, Maryland, and is represented by Goya Contemporary Gallery.

Reminder: 2021 SSAWW Conference – Upcoming Deadlines

UPCOMING DEADLINES

  • April 12 Confirm or submit any special requests for AV by emailing ssaww.conferences@gmail.com. AV REQUESTS CANNOT BE SUBMITTED AFTER THIS DEADLINE
  • April 12 Confirm receipt of your acceptance by completing the survey (link sent with acceptance letter)
  • June 1 Pay or Renew you SSAWW 2021 Membership Dues
  • September 1 Register for the conference to ensure your place on the program. Registration link will be available in May.

CFP: Legacy-sponsored panel at SSAWW (Deadline: 3.29.2021)

This CFP is for a pre-approved, Legacy-sponsored panel for the SSAWW 2021 Triennial Conference, to be held November 4-7 in Baltimore, Maryland.  At a time when many literary scholars are wondering how our work can more directly contribute to struggles for justice and survival, it makes sense to ask how the writers we study answered that question for themselves. We invite proposals for papers focusing on any aspect of the intersection between women’s literature with political organizing/activism. Topics could include women’s literature about political organizing, women’s literature that contributes to political organizing, political organizing on behalf of women’s literature, or women writers who are political activists. Other approaches welcome!

Please send 250-300 word abstracts to Kate Adams (kadams8@tulane.edu) by March 29.

SSAWW 2021 – Lifetime Achievement Award Nominations – Extended Deadline: 3.15.2021

Lifetime Achievement Award: The Karen Dandurand Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded every three years at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers’ conference to recognize a scholar’s career achievement in the study of American women writers. The award recognizes the individual’s commitment to the field, as demonstrated in her/his/their teaching, mentoring of students, scholarship, and service. The award is named in honor of Karen Dandurand, who passed away in 2011. She was one of the founding editors of Legacy and was an active member of SSAWW, serving as the Vice President of Development from 2004 to 2009. Nominators should submit a CV and brief (250 to 500 word) letter of support in one PDF file to the Lifetime Achievement Award  Chair: Dr. Julie Goodspeed-Chadwick, by EXTENDED DEADLINE March 15, 2021. She will distribute all nominations to the committee members. Please contact Dr. Goodspeed-Chadwick at juligood@iu.edu and  CC the Vice President of Development, Dr. Ellen Gruber Garvey ssaww.vpdevelopment@gmail.com to submit for this award.

Submissions: 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference (EXTENDED Deadline: 3.8.2021)

Submissions for the 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference

Please send your submissions as PDFs to ssaww.conferences@gmail.com

EXTENDED Deadline: March 8, 2021

Individual paper proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative paper title as well as a proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words with your name and email.

Pre-formed panel proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative panel title and contact information for the session chair. In addition, we will need a tentative title and a brief proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words for each participant. Note that panels typically consist of three, but no more than four, presenters who are each allotted between fifteen and twenty minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

Pre-formed roundtable proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative roundtable title and the contact information for the session chair. In addition, we will need a title and brief proposal of approximately 150 to 250 words for each participant. Note that roundtables typically consist of five to six participants allocated around six to eight minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

Workshop and exhibition proposals: Interested participants will be asked to provide a tentative session title as well as a brief workshop/exhibition overview of approximately 150 to 250 words. Workshops that would extend beyond traditional session time allotments or require a special space or set up must describe their needs in the proposal. Please include contact information for additional contributors, etc.

Special sessions (for SSAWW affiliate organizations): SSAWW affiliate organizations will be asked to provide a tentative panel title and contact information of the session chair. In addition, we will need a tentative title and a brief proposal of approximately 250 to 300 words for each participant. Note that panels typically consist of three presenters allotted fifteen to twenty minutes to present their work with time remaining for discussion.

For any special sessions (such as a syllabus/assignment exchange, film screening, etc.) that does not follow this format, please contact Dr. Ellen Gruber Garvey directly at ssaww.conferences@gmail.com with a query.

For complete sessions, please ensure that notifications are sent to potential participants by early January at the latest to allow those whose proposals are not accepted for the panel or roundtable to submit individual paper proposals by the submission deadline of March 8, 2021.

Please note (when possible) any A/V requirements for panels (please note that while we do recognize the need for support for some presentations, there are always high costs associated with securing this equipment that require us to be strategic).

Participants are allowed to appear on the final program no more than twice in an effort to allow as many individuals as possible the opportunity to participate. Participants will be listed in the program if they are presenting a paper, participating in a roundtable or workshop, or serving as the chair for a session. Participating in two different roles in the same session (e.g., as the chair and a panelist) would therefore count as two listings in the program. Please note that it is not permissible to present on two panels, though individuals can present as part of a panel and a roundtable session.

For help regarding any technical issues with submitting proposals or questions about the participation guidelines, please contact Dr. Sara Kosiba, Conference Associate for the 2021 conference, at ssaww.conferences@gmail.com; she is also the contact person for scheduling, A/V requests, etc.

For questions regarding the conference itself, please contact the Vice President of Organizational Matters, Dr. Maria Sanchez via E-mail at ssaww.vporganizationalmatters@gmail.com

Note that selected participants must be members of SSAWW no later than June 1, 2021 in order to secure their place on the conference program.

We look forward to receiving proposals for the many thoughtful and informative sessions that our SSAWW members always produce and to seeing you in Baltimore for yet another powerful SSAWW Triennial Conference.

For conference updates and additional information about the Society for the Study of American Women Writers, please visit the 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference tab on our main menu

2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference – Keynote Speaker – Joyce J. Scott

We are pleased to announce that Dr. Joyce J. Scott will serve as our keynote speaker for the 2021 SSAWW Triennial Conference.

“I’d like my art to induce people to stop raping, torturing, and shooting each other.

I don’t have the ability to end violence, racism, and sexism. But my art can help them look and think.”

—Joyce J. Scott 

MacArthur Fellow, Dr. Joyce J. Scott (b. 1948, Baltimore, MD) is best known for her figurative sculpture and jewelry using bead weaving techniques, as well as blown glass, and found objects.  As an African-American, feminist artist, Scott unapologetically confronts difficult themes as diverse as her subjects which include race, misogyny, sexuality, stereotypes, gender inequality, economic disparity, history, politics, rape, and discrimination. Over the past 50 years,  Scott has also established herself as an innovative fiber artist, print maker, installation artist, vocalist, and  performer.   

Joyce J. Scott  was born to sharecroppers in North Carolina who were descendants of slaves. Her family migrated to Baltimore,  where Joyce was born and raised. She earned her BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art, MFA from the Instituto Allende in Mexico, and was conferred honorary doctorates from both The Maryland Institute College of Art  and California College of the Arts. 

In 2017, Scott and her primary gallery, Goya Contemporary, opened her largest exhibition to date at Grounds For Sculpture in New Jersey.   In addition to historic and recent objects, Scott realized 2 large-scale site-specific works focused on the abolitionist Harriet Tubman, created at the Johnson Atelier.  Other major projects include glassworks made at Berengo Glass Studios on the Italian island of Murano, Italy, which were exhibited in the 2013 Venice Biennale collateral exhibition Glasstress, and a major one-person exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art.      Scott   has been the recipient of many commissions, grants, awards, and honors  from such institutions as the National Endowment for the Arts, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation, Anonymous Was a Woman, American Craft Council, National Living Treasure, Women’s Caucus for the Arts, The National Academy of Design, The Baker Award, MacArthur Foundation Fellowship Award, New York University Fellowship Award, and the Smithsonian Visionary Artist Award. Scott explores challenging subjects, powerfully revealing the equality between materials and practices often associated with “craft” and “fine art.”   She currently lives and works in Baltimore, Maryland, and is represented by Goya Contemporary Gallery.

CFP for SSAWW 2021: Harriet Beecher Stowe and her Circle (Deadline: 2.17.2021)

CFP for SSAWW 2021: Harriet Beecher Stowe and her Circle

Deadline: Wednesday, February 17, 2021

Contact: Allison Speicher, Eastern Connecticut State University

Email: speichera@easternct.edu

The Harriet Beecher Stowe Society invites paper proposals for the SSAWW 2021 Triennial Conference, to be held on November 4-7, 2021 in Baltimore, Maryland. Submissions can focus on any aspect of Stowe’s work or on the work of members of her circle, including her famous family, fellow participants in the Semi-Colon Club, and her many correspondents. Papers that connect to the conference theme “American Women Writers: Ecologies, Survival, Change” are especially welcome. Please send a 250-300 word abstract, a biographical statement (no longer than 60 words), and a brief CV to Allison Speicher (speichera@easternct.edu) by Wednesday, February 17.

CFP: Shelter in Place – Lessons on Pandemic Life from 19c American Women Writers & Culture (Deadline: 2.17.2021)

CFP: Shelter in Place:  

Lessons on Pandemic Life from 19c American Women Writers & Culture  at SSAWW 2021

The pandemic has blurred the lines between public and private life as well as the circumstances in which we live, labor, and love. This SSAWW roundtable asks participants to consider what might be gained by giving a backward glance to the connections between contemporary pandemic life under Covid 19 and nineteenth-century representations of domestic life and culture by American women writers. Many themes that permeate these earlier writers and their historical contexts seem ever-present today—from concepts of home and home improvement; definitions of the family and the domestic, and women’s place within it; a turn to nature and the outdoors; spirituality and faith; collective grief and loss; sentimentality and fellow feeling; as well as isolation and connection. It is our hope that looking back to our sisters from another era can help us better understand and make sense of pandemic domestic life and work. 

Possible questions and topics to consider:   

• How did 19c women writers and American culture attempt to process and overcome loss, tragedy, and grief? What can 19c women writers and culture teach us about life and death during times of (inter)national crisis and personal hardship? Does sentimental literature still have something to teach us?  

• Has the “cult of true womanhood” returned to haunt us? How do current changes in the labor market (specifically, women’s departure from it at a significantly higher rate than men, whether voluntary or involuntary) echo sentiments made by domestic literature, advice manuals and periodicals, especially those which implied women’s service to home would benefit both family and nation alike? How does this return to women as the moral center of the domestic, continue to highlight economic and racial disparities in America? 

• How do women balance work and home when they become one place—when she no longer has access to “a room of one’s own”? Can the woman writer/intellectual/teacher who is also a mother, really ever have it all, especially now?  How might 19c literary texts about the struggles of women who are living, laboring, and loving in less than ideal conditions encourage dialogues about how the pandemic is impacting women’s status in society and demands for equality? 

• How does the home or nature—not just as physical spaces, but as concepts—figure during the pandemic and in 19c texts?  

Please send abstracts (250-300 words) and a brief bio to Maglina Lubovich mlubovich@fdltcc.edu  and Trish Brady tmbrady@buffalo.edu by Wednesday, February 17, 2021.