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New Books: Critical Insights: Virginia Woolf & 20th Century Women Writers

vwoolfThis new collection contains essays on Woolf and some American

women writers, such as Sylvia Plath and Toni Morrison.

http://www.salempress.com/press_titles.html?book=126

Critical Insights: Virginia Woolf & 20th Century Women Writers introduces readers to the major turning points that occurred during this revolutionary time period. The essays in this volume showcase the multivalent nature of Woolf’s life and fiction, along with her pervasive and varied influence on a diverse array of women writers from Britain, Ireland, America, New Zealand, and the Caribbean. The women writers that were chosen represent Woolf’s transatlantic appeal across ethnic and national lines, across affinity and influence, friendship and mentorship.

New Books: Rebecca Rush’s Kelroy (1812) Introduction by Karen A. Weyler

Early American Reprints announces the publication of

 Rebecca Rush’s Kelroy (1812)

Introduction by Karen A. Weyler

This novel represents the third to be republished by Early American Reprints, the first being Martha Meredith Read’s Margaretta (1807), the second Tabitha Gilman Tenney’s Female Quixotism (1801). Early American Reprints, founded in 2012, is a not-nearly-for-profit, small-run publisher housed at St. Mary’s University in San Antonio. The press is funded entirely by its founder, Richard S. Pressman. Each release is a Critical Edition, with a professional critical introduction, ancillary materials, and extensive explanatory footnotes. For ease of reading, obvious errors in the original are corrected, paragraphing is normalized, and punctuation is modernized—while absolutely maintaining the original text’s integrity. Production quality is high, but prices are low to make the books affordable: (more…)

New Books: The Altar at Home: Sentimental Literature and Nineteenth-Century American Religion by Claudia Stokes

stokesThe Altar at Home: Sentimental Literature and Nineteenth-Century American Religion
Claudia Stokes

http://www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/15292.html

View table of contents

“Claudia Stokes presents a more textured account and provocatively mixed assessment of the sentimental tradition of American women’s letters than we have yet encountered.”—Tracy Fessenden, Arizona State University

“This is an excellent book—well researched, innovative, and beautifully written. Claudia Stokes shows a mastery of both literary sentimentalism and religious history, which she uses to bring out compelling new insights about what it meant for women to draw on sentimental codes as they forged new ways of participating in religious culture and public discussions.”—Nancy Bentley, University of Pennsylvania

Displays of devout religious faith are very much in evidence in nineteenth-century sentimental novels such as Uncle Tom’s Cabin and Little Women, but the precise theological nature of this piety has been little examined. In the first dedicated study of the religious contents of sentimental literature, Claudia Stokes counters the long-standing characterization of sentimental piety as blandly nondescript and demonstrates that these works were in fact groundbreaking, assertive, and highly specific in their theological recommendations and endorsements. The Altar at Home explores the many religious contexts and contents of sentimental literature of the American nineteenth century, from the growth of Methodism in the Second Great Awakening and popular millennialism to the developing theologies of Mormonism and Christian Science.

New Books: Serial Memoir: Archiving American Lives by Nicole Stamant

9781137410320Serial Memoir: Archiving American Lives by Nicole Stamant

http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/serial-memoir-nicole-stamant/?K=9781137410320

Serial Memoir: Archiving American Lives interrogates the presentation of subjectivity in serial memoir, arguing that seriality not only influences the way we read and understand contemporary autobiographical texts, it also changes our approach. In serial memoir, multiple versions of selfhood create an archive for the author because the selves and stories are materially collected, preserved, and (re)collected. Curiously neglected in critical examinations of the genre, serial memoir represents a significant trend in life writing as it illustrates a fundamental transition in how we document and archive our lives. In chapters examining the works of Mary McCarthy, Maya Angelou, Art Spiegelman, and Augusten Burroughs, Nicole Stamant shows some of the ways that serial memoirists record, engage, and perform lived experience in accord with larger social or cultural shifts in how people interact with one another; how they see themselves and their own participation in the global (and often virtual) sphere; and how they feel they can most effectively record their life narratives. Ultimately, seriality in memoir provides us with new ways to understand ourselves, and our lives, in relation to our pervasive serial culture.

http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/serial-memoir-nicole-stamant/?K=9781137410320

New Books: Thinking Outside the Book by Augusta Rohrbach

rohrbach

Thinking Outside the Book
AUGUSTA ROHRBACH
http://www.umass.edu/umpress/title/thinking-outside-book

In Thinking Outside the Book, Augusta Rohrbach works through the increasing convergences between digital humanities and literary studies to explore the meaning and primacy of the book as a literary, material, and cultural artifact. Rohrbach assembles a rather unlikely cohort of nineteenth-century women writers—Jane Johnston Schoolcraft, Sojourner Truth, Hannah Crafts, Augusta Evans, and Mary Chesnut—to consider the publishing culture of their period from the perspective of our current digital age, bringing together scholarly concepts from both print culture and new media studies.

More than a literary history, this book takes up theories of recovery, literacy, authorship, narrative, the book, and new media in connection with race, gender, class, and region.

“Rohrbach’s readings and archival work demonstrate how valuable the decentering of authorship can be for understanding how racialized and marginalized subjects relate to the literary marketplace, to be sure, but also simply for understanding the networked quality of the marketplace itself in the nineteenth century.”—MATT COHEN, author of The Networked Wilderness: Communicating in Early New England

New Books: Over the River and Through the Wood: An Anthology of Nineteenth-Century American Children’s Poetry

woodsOver the River and Through the Wood: An Anthology of Nineteenth-Century American Children’s Poetry
 edited by Karen L. Kilcup and Angela Sorby

Over the River and Through the Wood is the first and only collection of its kind, offering readers an unequaled view of the quality and diversity of nineteenth-century American children’s poetry. Most American poets wrote for children—from famous names such as Ralph Waldo Emerson to less familiar figures like Christina Moody, an African American author who published her first book at sixteen. In its excellence, relevance, and abundance, much of this work rivals or surpasses poetry written for adults, yet it has languished—inaccessible and unread—in old periodicals, gift books, and primers. This groundbreaking anthology remedies that loss, presenting material that is both critical to the tradition of American poetry and also a delight to read.

Complemented by period illustrations, this definitive collection includes work by poets from all geographical regions, as well as rarely seen poems by immigrant and ethnic writers and by children themselves. Karen L. Kilcup and Angela Sorby have combed the archives to present an extensive selection of rediscoveries along with traditional favorites. By turns playful, contemplative, humorous, and subversive, these poems appeal to modern sensibilities while giving scholars a revised picture of the nineteenth-century literary landscape

New Books: Toward a Female Genealogy of Transcendentalism, Edited by Jana Argersinger and Phyllis Cole

9780820343396Toward a Female Genealogy of Transcendentalism
Edited by Jana Argersinger and Phyllis Cole

University of Georgia Press 

http://www.ugapress.org/index.php/books/toward_a_female_genealogy_of_transcendentalism

The first large-scale, collaborative study of women’s voices and their vital role in the American transcendentalist movement.

Traditional histories of the American transcendentalist movement begin in Ralph Waldo Emerson’s terms: describing a rejection of college books and church pulpits in favor of the individual power of “Man Thinking.” This essay collection asks how women who lacked the privileges of both college and clergy rose to thought. For them, reading alone and conversing together were the primary means of growth, necessarily in private and informal spaces both overlapping with those of the men and apart from them. But these were means to achieving literary, aesthetic, and political authority—indeed, to claiming utopian possibility for women as a whole.

Toward a Female Genealogy of Transcendentalism is a project of both archaeology and reinterpretation. Many of its seventeen distinguished and rising scholars work from newly recovered archives, and all offer fresh readings of understudied topics and texts. First quickened by the 2010 bicentennial of Margaret Fuller’s birth, the project reaches beyond Fuller to her female predecessors, contemporaries, and successors throughout the nineteenth century who contributed to or grew from the transcendentalist movement.

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