Call for Proposals: Maine Women Writers Collection Research Support Grant Program (Deadline: 9.1.2022)

The Maine Women Writers Collection at the University of New England is excited to resume our Research Support Grant Program for 2022-23. We therefore invite proposals for research on site during the 2023 calendar year. Application deadline: 1 Sept. 2022.

MWWC Research Support Grants are intended for faculty, independent researchers, and graduate students at the dissertation stage who are actively pursuing research that requires or would benefit from access to the holdings of the Maine Women Writers Collection.

Grants range between $250 and $1,500 and may be used for transportation, housing, and research-related expenses. For more information, submission instructions, and a list of prior grant recipients, please visit https://library.une.edu/mwwc/ and click on “Research Support.”

The MWWC is located at the University of New England’s Portland Campus at 716 Stevens Ave., Portland, Maine 04103.

Please direct any questions to the MWWC Curator, Sarah Baker, at sbaker8@une.edu / (207) 221-4334.

Fellowship: 2022 Eudora Welty Research Fellowship (Deadline: 3.4.2022)

The deadline for the 2022 Eudora Welty Research Fellowship is March 4, 2022. 

2022 Fellowship Application Form

This competitive fellowship of $5,000 will be offered for research conducted in summer 2022. The stipend may be used to cover travel, housing, and other expenses during the recipient’s two-week stay in Jackson, Mississippi. 

Additional information, including the application form and a link to the Eudora Welty Collection description in our online catalog, are available here

For more details please contact Forrest Galey at fgaley@mdah.ms.gov

Sincerely, 

David M. Pilcher

Director, Archives and Record Services

Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Short-term Fellowship: Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture, University of Wisconsin-Madison (Deadline: 5.1.2022)

The James P. Danky Fellowships

In honor of Jim Danky’s long service to print culture scholarship, the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture, in conjunction with the Wisconsin Historical Society, is offering two short-term research fellowship awards for 2022-2023. The Danky Fellowships provide $1000 per individual for expenses while conducting research using the collections of the Wisconsin Historical Society (please see details of the collections).

As we are not able to anticipate how the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic will affect access to physical collections or travel during the academic year 2022-2023, we ask that those applying for the fellowship be open to either an in-person or distance research experience. In-person research is the assumed baseline mode, but may have to shift depending on timing and conditions.  

Grant money has traditionally been used for travel to the WHS, costs of copying pertinent archival resources, and living expenses while pursuing research. In the case of a distance research experience, the funds may be used for larger-scale digitization of materials. We invite fellowship recipients to present their work to our community in a format that will be determined in consultation with the recipient.

Preference will be given to:

  • proposals undertaking research in print culture history
  • research likely to lead to publication
  • researchers early in their career
  • researchers from outside Madison

Prior to applying it is strongly suggested that applicants contact the Wisconsin Historical Society (askarchives@wisconsinhistory.org or 608-264-6459) to discuss the relevancy of WHS collections to their projects. We encourage applicants to start this process early since the Wisconsin Historical Society staff may be able to identify potential collections of which you may not otherwise be aware. WHS staff are working at full capacity during the pandemic and will answer questions in as timely a manner as possible.

There is no application form. Applicants must submit the following:

  1. A cover sheet with name, telephone, permanent address and e-mail, current employer/affiliation, title of project, and proposed dates of residency.
  2. A letter of two single-spaced pages maximum describing the project and its relation to specifically cited collections at the society and to previous work on the same theme, and describing the projected outcome of the work, including publication plans. If residents of the Madison area are applying, they must explain their financial need for the stipend.
  3. Curriculum vitae.
  4. Two brief, confidential letters of reference. Graduate students must include their thesis advisor. Letters may be emailed to chpdc@ischool.wisc.edu by recommenders. 

Applications are due by May 1, 2022 for this fellowship cycle. The recipient will be notified by June 1. Please use your last name as the first word of all file names (for example: Name CV.doc) and email materials to: Jonathan Senchyne, Director, Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture: chpdc@ischool.wisc.edu.

Fellowship: 2022 Emily Dickinson International Society Graduate Student Fellowship (Deadline: 1.15.2022)

2022 Emily Dickinson International Society Graduate Student Fellowship


The EDIS announces a fellowship award of $2,000 in support of excellence in graduate student scholarship on Emily Dickinson. The project need not be devoted solely to Dickinson, but her work should be a substantial focus. The award may be used for any expense incurred to advance the project. Preference will be given to applicants in the dissertation stage or writing a work aimed at peer-reviewed digital or print publication. Graduate students from the United States as well as other countries are encouraged to apply; the application as well as the scholarly work must, however, be in English.

To apply, please send a cv, a cover letter, a 600-800 word project description, a brief bibliography, and contact information for two references familiar with the work to Eliza Richards at ecr@email.unc.edu<mailto:ecr@email.unc.edu>. Use the subject line “EDIS grad award.last name.” Please ensure that you receive confirmation of receipt.

Applications are due by January 15, 2022. The Awards Committee will review the proposals; applicants will be notified of final decisions by February 15, 2022. The award recipient will be asked to submit a report about the work accomplished with the fellowship support within one year.

Recovery Hub for American Women Writers (Extended Deadline: 3.31.2021)

The Recovery Hub for American Women Writers is extending its call for peer reviewed and cultivated projects through March 31.

The Recovery Hub for American Women Writers supports projects recovering the work of women writers by providing digital access to forgotten or neglected texts and/or extending them with network mapping, spatial analysis, multimedia storytelling, innovative contextualization, and the distant reading of massive datasets. 

Seeking Support through Project Cultivation

Apply at https://recoveryhub.siue.edu/cultivation/ 

Each year The Recovery Hub for American Women Writers will provide significant support for two digital projects in their early phases. Project cultivation can range from guidance through the process of textually encoding a small edition to more in-depth support, including but not limited to creating a project charter, formulating a research design, learning new technologies, searching for funding, and hosting on the Hub’s servers. Projects eligible for support include digital editions of letters, books, short fiction, and other texts as well as experimental projects that explore mapping, visualization, and other content-rich methods. The Hub’s editorial platform is designed to support scholars who want to encode their recovered documents using the best technical and sustainability standards but who have limited experience with the digital humanities. For examples of the range in project types and sizes the Hub supports, see Alex W. Black, Brigitte Fielder, and Johanna Ortner’s Just Teach One: Early African American Print edition of Frances Ellen Watkins (Harper)’s Forest Leaves, Kevin Mcmullen’s Fanny Fern in the New York Ledgeror Jordan Von Cannon’s Transatlantic Departures: Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Travel’s Abroad.

Project cultivation support is available for researchers at any rank, with or without institutional affiliations. Recovery practitioners who are awarded project cultivation will also receive a $2,000 stipend to support their work on the project during the Hub’s pilot phase. Practitioners are expected to dedicate at least 80 hours of work to the project throughout the course of the year and attend meetings and training with the Hub’s staff. Complete the application no later than March 31, 2021, to have your project considered for pilot cultivation beginning April 1.

Requesting Peer Review

Request at https://recoveryhub.siue.edu/peer_review/ 

The Recovery Hub for American Women Writers peer reviews digital projects at various stages of completion. Projects are publicized by SSAWW, reviewed in Legacy, and included in a twice-yearly showcase on the Hub website. Peer-reviewed projects will also be featured in a pedagogical forum where educators at the K-12 and college level can access professionally produced teaching materials, including assignments, video interviews, and examples of student work. The Hub’s peer review process is grounded in feminist practice; reviewers use an open model that emphasizes one-on-one mentorship and encourages project directors to build upon and cite the work of other feminists. The Hub also values the iterative nature of digital projects by offering in-process peer review even at a project’s earliest stages. An article outlining the results of peer review will be published on the website with each project to model best practices and demonstrate the value of digital recovery work. Submit requests to be included in the pilot peer review process no later than March 31, 2021

Learn about the Recovery Hub’s Mission: https://recoveryhub.siue.edu/mission/

Professor Jessica DeSpain
Co-Director of SIUE’s IRIS Center
Department of English Language and Literature
Southern Illinois University EdwardsvilleProfessor Jessica DeSpain
Co-Director of SIUE’s IRIS Center
Department of English Language and Literature
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Recovery Hub for American Women Writers Debut Project Call

Recovery Hub for American Women Writers

Call for Pilot Projects–Eligible for Consultation, Cultivation, and Peer Review


The Recovery Hub for American Women Writers supports projects recovering the work of women writers by providing digital access to forgotten or neglected texts and/or extending them with network mapping, spatial analysis, multimedia storytelling, innovative contextualization, and the distant reading of massive datasets. The Recovery Hub explores the intersecting relationships between feminist practice, content, and technical specifications with an awareness of the ways that the design and implementation of technology can exclude and objectify people. Though there are notable exceptions, the digital humanities is not often geared in content or design toward addressing, attracting, or educating women or people of color. Committed to cultivating a community of diverse scholars as well as inclusive project content, the Hub’s Advisory Board aims for at least 50% of its affiliated projects to recover Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian, and LGBTQIA+ stories, texts, experiences, and voices. The Hub is a mechanism for pooled funding bids and offers hands-on consultation to navigate project management, quality control, sustainability, and peer review in order to increase the quantity and quality of recovery projects focused on American women writers. The Hub fosters collaboration, mentorship, and community-building among women working in the digital humanities while seeking feminist and decolonial approaches to the creation, curation, design, sharing, and archiving of digital content. Read the Recovery Hub for American Women Writers full Mission Statement.

The Recovery Hub has undergone a year of planning, and we are now seeking volunteers who would like to pilot our services. We are currently hiring consultants and plan to begin offering consultation in May 2021. Because we will assess our process and methods during this pilot phase, all participants will be asked to provide feedback on their experiences with the Recovery Hub.

Serving as a Consultant 

Apply Now

Join a network of consultants, built of researchers, educators, technicians, librarians, and community leaders with a variety of skills and experiences who are interested and invested in the recovery of the works of women writers using digital methods. This network can help those working on new and growing digital projects engage in the recovery of women’s writing. Consultants will advise projects members on what technologies can be explored and will lead them to information, resources, and methods. Consultants will have a general familiarity with the digital humanities, experience with current tools and methods, and an awareness of projects that can serve as models. Consultants will commit to working with the Hub for one year and be paid $25 per hour of consultation. Consultants will be compensated for undergoing webinar training, as well. They should expect to support a wide range of projects that approach the Recovery Hub each year and participate in monthly meetings with Recovery Hub staff. 

Seeking Sustained Support through Project Cultivation

Apply Now

Each year The Recovery Hub for American Women Writers will provide significant support for two digital projects in their early phases. Project cultivation can range from guidance through the process of textually encoding a small edition to more in-depth support, including but not limited to creating a project charter, formulating a research design, learning new technologies, searching for funding, and hosting on the Hub’s servers. Projects eligible for support include digital editions of letters, books, short fiction, and other texts as well as experimental projects that explore mapping, visualization, and other content-rich methods. The Hub’s editorial platform is designed to support scholars who want to encode their recovered documents using the best technical and sustainability standards but who have limited experience with the digital humanities. For examples of the range in project types and sizes the Hub supports, see Alex W. Black, Brigitte Fielder, and Johanna Ortner’s Just Teach One: Early African American Print edition of Frances Ellen Watkins (Harper)’s Forest Leaves, Kevin Mcmullen’s Fanny Fern in the New York Ledger, or Jordan Von Cannon’s Transatlantic Departures: Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Travel’s Abroad.

Project cultivation support is available for researchers at any rank, with or without institutional affiliations. Recovery practitioners who are awarded project cultivation will also receive a $2,000 stipend to support their work on the project during the Hub’s pilot phase. Practitioners are expected to dedicate at least 80 hours of work to the project throughout the course of the year and attend meetings and training with the Hub’s staff. Complete the application no later than March 15, 2021, to have your project considered for pilot cultivation beginning April 1.

Requesting Peer Review

Request Now

The Recovery Hub for American Women Writers peer reviews digital projects at various stages of completion. Projects are publicized by SSAWW, reviewed in Legacy, and included in a twice-yearly showcase on the Hub website. Peer-reviewed projects will also be featured in a pedagogical forum where educators at the K-12 and college level can access professionally produced teaching materials, including assignments, video interviews, and examples of student work. The Hub’s peer review process is grounded in feminist practice; reviewers use an open model that emphasizes one-on-one mentorship and encourages project directors to build upon and cite the work of other feminists. The Hub also values the iterative nature of digital projects by offering in-process peer review even at a project’s earliest stages. An article outlining the results of peer review will be published on the website with each project to model best practices and demonstrate the value of digital recovery work. Submit requests to be included in the pilot peer review process no later than March 15, 2021.

If you have questions, reply to recoveryhub@siue.edu

Call for Applications: Willa Cather Scholarship (Deadline: 12.1.2020)

Call for Applications: Nebraska Cather Collaborative Research Grants for Willa Cather Scholarship (2021)

The Cather Project of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) English Department, in cooperation with the Cather Archive of the UNL Libraries and the National Willa Cather Center (NWCC) in Red Cloud, announces the availability of research grants for visiting scholars. These grants provide financial support for scholars to travel to and reside in Nebraska for one to four weeks to conduct research on Willa Cather in UNL Archives and Special Collections and in the Archive of the NWCC. Scholars from advanced doctoral students through senior faculty are invited to apply (note the change from the previous Woodress Scholars research grants program).

Proposed projects should reflect the need to conduct research in UNL Archives and Special Collections, although researchers are also encouraged to conduct research at the NWCC and to experience Cather’s Nebraska hometown during their residence. Red Cloud is 2 ½ hours from Lincoln by car. Successful applicants will be awarded $1,000 per week for up to four weeks. The deadline for submission of materials is DECEMBER 1, 2020, and we will inform successful applicants by FEBRUARY 1, 2021. Weeks in residence, which need not be consecutive, should fall between March 1, 2020 and February 28, 2021. Note, however, that considering the contingencies of the pandemic, grant funds will be held in reserve and may be taken up later if archives access and safe travel are not available during this period.

The Cather Project will assist successful applicants with advice about travel and lodging. When successful applicants are in residence, they will receive advice and guidance from scholars associated with the Cather Project and the Cather Archive and, depending on schedule and availability, have the opportunity to present their work in progress. The Cather Project (https://www.unl.edu/english/cather-project) produces the Willa Cather Scholarly Edition and Cather Studies, both published by the University of Nebraska Press. The Cather Archive (https://cather.unl.edu) is a digital project dedicated to study of Willa Cather’s life and writings and the home of The Complete Letters of Willa Cather. The Archives and Special Collections of the UNL Libraries holds the largest collection of letters from and to Cather; edited typescripts and manuscripts of her works; multiple editions of her works; and many other Cather-associated materials. For more on these collections, see the finding aids for the various Cather-related collections https://libraries.unl.edu/cather-collections. The growing archive of the National Willa Cather Center includes books, letters, photographs, and personal items. Information about these collections can be accessed here: https://www.willacather.org/learn/collections-and-archives-national-willa-cather-center

These grants are funded by the Willa Cather Fund and the Roberta and James Woodress Fund, both of which are administered by the University of Nebraska Foundation. When schedule and availability permits, the NWCC will provide In-kind support in the form of housing in Red Cloud. To apply, please send to Beth Burke (eburke3@unl.edu), Cather Project Specialist, as e-mail attachments the following items:

  • · your c.v. (please limit to 2 pages)
  • · an application statement of no more than 3 pages describing your proposed research project and the importance of materials and resources at UNL and the NWCC to your project (please be specific).

In addition, a professional letter of recommendation should be sent directly by your recommender to Beth Burke (eburke3@unl.edu). The letter should be specific to the fellowship and proposed project rather than a general letter of recommendation (such as a letter from job placement dossier).

Please address questions about these grants to Professor Melissa J. Homestead, Director of the Cather Project (mhomestead2@unl.edu).

Deadline approaching: 2020 Eudora Welty Research Fellowship (Deadline: 2.28.2020)

There is still time to submit an application for the 2020 Eudora Welty Research Fellowship.

This competitive fellowship of $2,000 will be offered for research conducted in summer 2020.


The deadline for applications is February 28, 2020. The application form and additional information are available on the MDAH website at http://www.mdah.ms.gov/welty/resources/welty-fellowship.php.

David M. Pilcher Director, Archives and Record Services Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Library Company of Philadelphia – NEW FELLOWSHIP (Deadline: 3.1.2020)

The Davida T. Deutsch / American Trust for the British Library/ Library Company of Philadelphia fellowship supports a research project drawing on the collections of both the British Library (in any of its departments) and the Library Company.  The fellow will be in residence at each library for at least two weeks (not necessarily consecutive) and will receive a stipend of $5,000, which may be applied to transportation and lodging expenses.  Applicants must be US citizens and graduate students or recipients of a doctoral degree within the previous year.  Preference will be given to women who are members of underrepresented racial and ethnic groups and working in the fields of women’s history or African American history.  For details and application instructions, see https://librarycompany.org/academic-programs/fellowships/