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SSAWW Annual Business Meeting at ALA in Boston, MA (Friday, May 26, 2017)

SSAWW Annual Business Meeting

The Society for the Study of American Women Writers invites members to attend its annual business meeting at the 28th Annual Conference on American Literature organized by the ALA in Boston, MA.  The SSAWW business meeting is scheduled for Friday, May 26, 2017, 2:10-3:30pm, Session 11-K.    If you are attending ALA, please plan to attend this meeting.

CFP: Pauline Hopkins Society Scholar Award (Deadline 04.15.2017)

2017 – Pauline Hopkins Scholar Award

The Pauline Hopkins Society (http://www.paulinehopkinssociety.org) is pleased to announce its second bi-annual competition for the best essay or book chapter on Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins published between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2016.  If you have published an essay or chapter that discusses Hopkins and/or her work, we invite you to consider entering before the April 15, 2017 deadline.

Because entries will be judged through a system of blind reviewing we recommend that any self-citation, either in the body or in notes, be reworked to the third person.

How to Enter:

Essays should be double-spaced throughout, with your name appearing only on the cover sheet, along with your institutional mailing address and e-mail address.

Please send essay as a pdf email attachment by April 15, 2017 to: PHSscholaraward@gmail.com

The award of a $100 cash prize will be presented during a special ceremony commemorating Hopkins and her work in Boston during the American Literature Association annual conference in May 2017.

CFP: Rebecca Harding Davis at ALA 2017 (Deadline 1.20.17)

The Society for the Study of Rebecca Harding Davis and Her World welcomes proposals for two sessions at the next meeting of the American Literature Association. The conference will be held May 25-28, 2017 in Boston, MA.  For further information about the conference, please consult the ALA website at www.americanliterature.org.

1.   Joint Session with the Louisa May Alcott Society:  Rebecca Harding Davis (1831-1910) and Louisa May Alcott (1832 – 1888) witnessed dramatic changes in American culture throughout their lifetimes.  As authors, they explored a variety of genres, including realist fiction (often oriented toward reform), gothic fiction, children’s literature, essays, and journalism.  Both women viewed aspects of the Civil War firsthand, were troubled by the effects of industrialization and the factory system, critiqued the position of women in nineteenth-century culture and advocated for women’s rights.  They also at times examined the tension between philosophical ideals and the pragmatic demands of daily life.  Both women experienced the vicissitudes of publication, recognition, and careers in authorship. Davis and Alcott met during a visit Davis made to Concord in 1862.  About this meeting, Alcott wrote in her Journal for May 1862 “Saw Miss Rebecca Harding, author of ‘Margaret Howth,’which has made quite a stir, and is very good. A handsome, fresh, quiet woman, who says she never has any troubles, though she writes about woes.  I told her I had had lots of troubles; so I write jolly tales; and we wondered why we each did so.” 
The two authors encountered each other again years later, and Davis recorded their meeting in Bits of Gossip (1904):
Years afterward she came to the city where I was living and I hurried to meet her.  The lean, eager, defiant girl was gone, and instead, there came to greet me a large, portly, middle-aged woman, richly dressed.  Everything about her, from her shrewd, calm eyes to the rustle of her satin gown told of assured success.
Yet I am sure fame and success counted for nothing with her except for the material aid which they enabled her to give to a few men and women whom she loved. . . . Louisa Alcott wrote books which were true and fine, but she never imagined a life as noble as her own.

To explore the connections between these two significant 19th-century women’s voices in greater depth, the Rebecca Harding Davis Society and the Louisa May Alcott Society will offer a joint panel at the American Literature Association in May 2017.  We invite papers that examine how Alcott and Davis treat or respond to any of the issues mentioned in the opening paragraph.
Send brief abstracts by January 20, 2017 to Mischa Renfroe (Mischa.Renfroe@mtsu.edu) and Melissa Pennell (Melissa_Pennell@uml.edu
2.  Open Topic Session:   We welcome proposals that engage any aspect of Davis’s work and are especially interested in new readings of neglected texts.  Presenters must be members of the Society for the Study of Rebecca Harding Davis and Her World.  For information about joining the society, please visit our website athttp://scotus.francis.edu/rebeccahardingdavis/  
Deadline: January 20, 2017
Please send a 200-250 word abstract to :
Mischa Renfroe
Middle Tennessee State University
and                              

 

CFP: ALA 2017 Rebecca Harding Davis Society (Deadline 1.20.17)

The Society for the Study of Rebecca Harding Davis and Her World welcomes proposals for two sessions at the next meeting of the American Literature Association. The conference will be held May 25-28, 2017 in Boston, MA.  For further information about the conference, please consult the ALA website at www.americanliterature.org.

1.   Joint Session with the Louisa May Alcott Society:  Rebecca Harding Davis (1831-1910) and Louisa May Alcott (1832 – 1888) witnessed dramatic changes in American culture throughout their lifetimes.  As authors, they explored a variety of genres, including realist fiction (often oriented toward reform), gothic fiction, children’s literature, essays, and journalism.  Both women viewed aspects of the Civil War firsthand, were troubled by the effects of industrialization and the factory system, critiqued the position of women in nineteenth-century culture and advocated for women’s rights.  They also at times examined the tension between philosophical ideals and the pragmatic demands of daily life.  Both women experienced the vicissitudes of publication, recognition, and careers in authorship. Davis and Alcott met during a visit Davis made to Concord in 1862.  About this meeting, Alcott wrote in her Journal for May 1862 “Saw Miss Rebecca Harding, author of ‘Margaret Howth,’which has made quite a stir, and is very good. A handsome, fresh, quiet woman, who says she never has any troubles, though she writes about woes.  I told her I had had lots of troubles; so I write jolly tales; and we wondered why we each did so.”

The two authors encountered each other again years later, and Davis recorded their meeting in Bits of Gossip (1904):

Years afterward she came to the city where I was living and I hurried to meet her.  The lean, eager, defiant girl was gone, and instead, there came to greet me a large, portly, middle-aged woman, richly dressed.  Everything about her, from her shrewd, calm eyes to the rustle of her satin gown told of assured success.

Yet I am sure fame and success counted for nothing with her except for the material aid which they enabled her to give to a few men and women whom she loved. . . . Louisa Alcott wrote books which were true and fine, but she never imagined a life as noble as her own.

 

To explore the connections between these two significant 19th-century women’s voices in greater depth, the Rebecca Harding Davis Society and the Louisa May Alcott Society will offer a joint panel at the American Literature Association in May 2017.  We invite papers that examine how Alcott and Davis treat or respond to any of the issues mentioned in the opening paragraph.

 

Send brief abstracts by January 20, 2017 to Mischa Renfroe (Mischa.Renfroe@mtsu.edu) and Melissa Pennell (Melissa_Pennell@uml.edu

2.  Open Topic Session:   We welcome proposals that engage any aspect of Davis’s work and are especially interested in new readings of neglected texts.  Presenters must be members of the Society for the Study of Rebecca Harding Davis and Her World.  For information about joining the society, please visit our website at http://scotus.francis.edu/rebeccahardingdavis/

Deadline: January 20, 2017

Please send a 200-250 word abstract to :

Mischa Renfroe

Middle Tennessee State University

mischa.renfroe@mtsu.edu

and

Sharon Harris
sharon.harris@uconn.edu

CFP: Catharine Sedgwick Society at ALA (Deadline 1.15.17)

As we head toward the 150th anniversary of Catharine Sedgwick’s death and the 20th anniversary of the CMS Society in 2017, we invite proposals for the following panel for ALA 2017:

Session #1: TIME, MEMORIALS AND ANNIVERSARIES (3 or 4 15 to 20-minute papers):

How is “time” referenced in Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s writings? Does her sense of time seem consistent at moments with Wordsworth’s “spots of time”? Is there more that can be said about her “anachronistic imaginings,” to take a phrase from Jeffrey Insko’s 2004 essay, “Anachronistic Imaginings: Hope Leslie’s Challenge to Historicism?” What about her attention to memory, memorials, and monuments, and how space and visual culture relate to notions of time? What about anniversaries, rituals and annual or seasonal celebrations? This panel invites proposals on these and other issues related to the perception of time, the passage of time, and the celebration of times past in Sedgwick’s writings or the writings of her contemporaries.

I want to remind readers that the Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society is holding its 8th symposium in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, June 7-10, 2017, celebrating both the 150th anniversary of Sedgwick’s death and the 20th anniversary of the CMS Society. The focus for the symposium is “Where and When: Evolving Concepts of Place, Space, and Time in the Writings of Sedgwick and Her Contemporaries.” There is potential to have meaningful overlap between the May ALA panel and the June symposium. The Society asks that participants do not deliver exactly the same paper at both events but encourages work that connects papers between the different forums or initiates an ongoing conversation.

ALA will be held May 25-28, 2017 (Thursday to Sunday of Memorial Day weekend) at Westin Copley Place in Boston, MA.

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: January 15, 2017

Please send abstracts to Lisa West, V.P. for External Conferences, CMS Society: lisa.west@drake.edu

CFP: Lydia Maria Child Society at ALA (Revised Deadline: 01.27.16)

Revised Deadline:  27 January 2016

 CALL FOR PAPERS:  LYDIA MARIA CHILD SOCIETY AT ALA 2016

The Lydia Maria Child Society (LMCS) is looking for submissions for a panel to be held at the annual American Literature Association conference in San Francisco, CA, 26 – 29 May 2016 at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco (http://alaconf.org/annual-conference/ [1] [1 [1]]).

We value sharing ideas about Lydia Maria Child and her work, so we’re sending an open-topic call with an extended deadline of 27 January 2016.  What aspects of Child’s life and writing deserve to be introduced, explored, assessed, re-evaluated, or shared?  How might social justice or social responsibility fit into your ideas, however broadly or narrowly they’re construed?  What makes you passionate about Child’s work?  What makes Child passionate about her work?  Share your ideas with us!  We want to hear from you!

Please send 250-word abstracts and a brief CV to Sandy Burr at sburr@nmu.edu by 27 JANUARY 2016

CFP: Catharine Sedgwick Society at ALA (Extended Deadline: 01.23.16)

American Literature Association Conference – San Francisco (May 26-29, 2016)

The Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society invites proposals for two panels at ALA.

Session #1 (15 to 20-minute papers): “Catharine Sedgwick’s New England”

A New England Tale
(1822) was one of the first of Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s novels to be republished and garner critical attention. Since its recovery, there has been increased interest in other early American women writers, such as Hannah Foster, Susannah Rowson, and Lydia Maria Child. There also has been a surge of interest in the American novel written before 1820. This panel seeks scholarship on “Catharine Sedgwick’s New England” that situates the work of Sedgwick and other American women writers in the increasingly global public sphere of the early nineteenth century. Papers might address (but certainly aren’t limited to) the transatlantic genre of the “village sketch”; New England religion in the context of the Second Great Awakening and global encounters with non-Christian peoples (particularly relevant in the current political climate); Sedgwick and the rise of the early American novel and/or the rise of the American short story; women writers in public; writing about New England as a response to (or retreat from) the responsibilities of nationhood; relationships between early American authors and their European friends/family/publishers/correspondents.

Session #2:   “Teaching Catharine Maria Sedgwick” (roundtable–10-min talks/presentations)


With the recent republication of Clarence and Married or Single?, and the growing online inventory at “Sedgwick Stories: The Periodical Writings of Catharine Maria Sedgwick,” http://sedgwickstories.omeka.net/, more Sedgwick texts are available for the classroom. The ongoing “Just Read/Teach One Sedgwick Story” challenge invites even wider readership. This panel will focus on reading/teaching Catharine Maria Sedgwick at all levels.  Papers do not need to focus on the newest editions. Instead we welcome all papers addressing teaching Sedgwick in this new era when more texts are available in print and through the web. Particularly welcome are papers on teaching future teachers, teaching high school students, teaching in alternative classrooms, and foci on other specific student populations.

EXTENDED DEADLINE: January 23, 2016.

Please send abstracts to Lisa West, V.P. for External Conferences, CMS Society: lisa.west@drake.edu