CFP: Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society at ALA (Extended Deadline: 1.29.2019)

CFP: New Approaches to Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society

American Literature Association (ALA), 30th Annual Conference, May 23-25, 2019

Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s life and work intersect a universe of historical discourses: a testament to Gilman’s rapacious reading habit, sweeping interdisciplinary curiosity, and to her sustained engagement with pressing contemporary issues, scientific discoveries, and progressive remedies embraced by feminists of her time. This session invites papers that discuss new approaches to reading the life, work, and/or literature of Charlotte Perkins Gilman and her intellectual peers, predecessors, and descendants. The panel will gather a selection of papers that help to widen our understanding of the historical, social, literary, and political movements that surrounded one of America’s most famous feminists. Topics may include theoretical approaches to Gilman, such as queer theory, critical race studies, and genre studies, alternative visions of motherhood, feminism in the socialist movement, visual art in women’s writing, reform, recovery, and the archive, and any of the broad connections springing from the life and work of Gilman. Submit a 250-500 word abstract and a CV by January 29, 2019 to Hannah Huber at hhuber@email.sc.edu

For more information about the conference, please visit the ALA website at www.americanliterature.org.

CFP: Lydia Maria Child Society at ALA (Deadline: 1.20.2019)

REMINDER:  20 JAN. 2019 DEADLINE!

CFP: Lydia Maria Child Society
American Literature Association Conference in Boston, MA
23–26 May 2019 at the Westin Copley Place

(URL: https://americanliteratureassociation.org/ala-conferences/ala-annual-conference/)

The Lydia Maria Child Society welcomes proposals for a panel co-organized with the Louisa May Alcott Society and for a social-justice pedagogy roundtable!

Notorious Women, Sensational Texts:  The Lives, Writings, and Reforms of Louisa May Alcott and Lydia Maria Child    

Organized jointly by the Lydia Maria Child and Louisa May Alcott Societies, this session will examine the lives, writings, and reforms of two enormously popular and prolific nineteenth-century women writers.

Child founded the nation’s first children’s magazine, The Juvenile Miscellany, which she edited from 1826 – 1834, a generation ahead of Alcott’s bestselling books for young people.  Child’s conduct manuals, such as The Frugal Housewife, enjoyed wide attention as well.  Championing disenfranchised peoples, however, triggered critical backlash.  At the age of twenty-two, Child portrayed a marriage between a white woman and a Native American man in her first novel, Hobomok (1824), an audacious choice that reviewers largely disparaged (the book’s poor sales left her deeply in debt).  Yet her career suffered its most devastating setback after she published An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans (1833), the first complete history of slavery by an American writer.  Here Child calls for the immediate emancipation of US slaves, a radical stance that she shared with infamous abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison.  Although Child wrote and edited until she died, her career never recovered from public reaction to her political views.  Undeterred, she tirelessly advocated social reforms in writings such asLetters from New York (beginning in 1841) and A Romance of the Republic (1867).

Writing a generation later, Louisa May Alcott divided her authorial time between books for children, which paid handsomely, and the lurid, anonymously authored fiction that she preferred. In these sensational stories and novels, Alcott (writing as A. M. Barnard) spun tales like Beneath the Mask and “Pauline’s Passion and Punishment,” in which notorious women take revenge on the men who have wronged them and often claim control over their own lives. Like Child, Alcott was an outspoken advocate for antislavery and women’s rights, with poems, essays, and fiction depicting unsung social reformers as the nation’s true heroes. In Moods (1864), for example, Alcott deliberately challenges notions of the conventional marriage plot, just as Child does with a controversial marriage in Hobomok.

We seek abstracts that consider literary, historical, and biographical connections across the lives and literary outputs of Child and Alcott. What kind of role model did Alcott find in fellow Bostonian Lydia Maria Child? Is Alcott’s choice to mask the women in her sensational fiction a deliberate effort to avoid Child’s fate at the hands of readers and critics? Given that both Child and Alcott edited children’s magazines and wrote specifically for child and adult audiences, how might we compare their stated approaches to or philosophies about writing for children versus adults? In which literary texts do Alcott and Child’s cross-generational reform-mindedness seem to play a similar role? What differences emerge from an analysis of Alcott and Child’s reformist views on topics such as white supremacy, native peoples, American slavery, immigration, women’s physical fitness, and women’s rights?

Send 250-300 word abstracts by January 20, 2019, to Sandy Burr at sburr@nmu.edu; and to Sandy Petrulionis at shp2@psu.edu. 

Social-Justice Pedagogy Roundtable

The Lydia Maria Child Society seeks participants for a roundtable on pedagogy, social justice, and American literature. Considering contemporary social justice concerns ranging from the Black Lives Matter movement to the Dakota Access Pipeline controversy to persistent gender inequities and xenophobia made all too apparent by the 2016 presidential election and the resulting anti-woman and anti-immigrant policies, the Child Society feels strongly that many of the issues for which Child fought so passionately remain deeply relevant today. To honor her lifelong commitment to both education and writing as ways to attain social change, we ask that our selected panelists prepare briefpresentations (approximately 10 minutes) on how they address the above issues and/or others within the literature classroom, before engaging in what we hope will be a fruitful and wide-ranging open discussion on social justice pedagogies and American literature. What texts and social issues have proved particularly pertinent to your students’ lived experiences of activism, marginalization, etc.? How do you productively draw parallels between the concerns of the literary works you teach and those we are facing in the world outside the classroom? What specific lesson plans, textual pairings/groupings, and/or other pedagogical approaches might you recommend to colleagues striving to make their syllabi and classrooms more socially conscious and engaged?

Please send 200-word abstracts of your proposed presentation, as Word documents, to lydiamariachildsociety@gmail.com by January 20, 2019.  Note that while we, of course, welcome proposals that engage with Child’s work, Child need not be included for your proposal to be considered.

LMC Society
Sarah Olivier, President
Sandy Burr, VP of Programs
Tracey-Lynn Clough, VP of Communications & Digital Development
Lucy Sirianni, VP of Inclusive Excellence & Social Action

CFP: Charlotte Perkins Gilman at ALA (Deadline: 1.26.2019)

CFP: New Approaches to Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society

American Literature Association (ALA)
30th Annual Conference
May 23-25, 2019

Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s life and work intersect a universe of historical discourses: a testament to Gilman’s rapacious reading habit, sweeping interdisciplinary curiosity, and to her sustained engagement with pressing contemporary issues, scientific discoveries, and progressive remedies embraced by feminists of her time. This session invites papers that discuss new approaches to reading the life, work, and/or literature of Charlotte Perkins Gilman and her intellectual peers, predecessors, and descendants. The panel will gather a selection of papers that help to widen our understanding of the historical, social, literary, and political movements that surrounded one of America’s most famous feminists. Topics may include theoretical approaches to Gilman, such as queer theory, critical race studies, and genre studies, alternative visions of motherhood, feminism in the socialist movement, visual art in women’s writing, reform, recovery, and the archive, and any of the broad connections springing from the life and work of Gilman. Submit 250 to 500-word abstracts and a CV, by January 26, 2019, to Hannah Huber at hhuber@email.sc.edu.

For more information about the conference, please visit the ALA website at www.americanliterature.org.

CFP: Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society at ALA (Deadline: 1.15.2019)

CALL FOR PAPERS – Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society

2019 American Literature Association Conference,

May 23-26, 2019, Westin Copley Hotel, Boston, MA

Send 200 word abstracts to Lisa West, lisa.west@drake.edu by January 15, 2019.

Catharine Maria Sedgwick and the Gothic or Supernatural

While Sedgwick is associated with Federalist politics, reason, republican sensibility, and moral leadership, her writings do venture into the gothic, the uncanny, the supernatural, and the enchanted.  This panel will explore the underexamined ways Sedgwick uses the gothic and the supernatural in her fiction and other writings.  Panelists are encouraged to consider ways she responds to a transatlantic gothic tradition or to think about the religious supernatural. Panelists can build on ideas and papers presented at 2018 ALA or SSAWW.  Papers are also welcome on writers who are contemporaries of Sedgwick, such as Washington Irving or Lydia Maria Child. Send 200-word abstracts to Lisa West, lisa.west@drake.edu by January 15, 2019.

The Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society is sponsoring a roundtable on:

Sedgwick’s Letters: Material Letters, Transcribed Letters, Fictional Letters, Digitized Letters.

This roundtable will put the exciting work of the Catharine Maria Sedgwick Online Letter  (CMSOL) Project in conversation with theoretical approaches to “the letter” in a variety of contexts.  CMSOL is an ongoing initiative with the goal of making the correspondence of Sedgwick held at the Massachusetts Historical Society publicly available in digitized form.  This project is significant not only in developing the scholarly infrastructure of Sedgwick Studies but also in linking archives, scholars, and the general public.  The project raises numerous ethical and pragmatic issues about reading, transcribing, and editing letters.  We welcome short presentations on Sedgwick’s (or her contemporaries’) personal letters, letters embedded within novels, letters from abroad, or references to letters.  Scholarly challenges in working with letters or family papers also welcome, as are presentations that consider the role of letter-writing within a broader literary culture.  Send 200-word abstracts to Lisa West, lisa.west@drake.edu by January 15, 2019.

 

CFP: Constance Fenimore Woolson Society at ALA 2019 (Deadline: 1.25.2019)

CFP: New Directions in Woolson Scholarship

at ALA 2019

The Constance Fenimore Woolson Society welcomes proposals for a session at the next meeting of the American Literature Association, to be be held May 23-26, 2019, in Boston, MA.

We welcome proposals that engage any aspect of Woolson’s work, from “Rodman the Keeper” or “Miss Grief” to lesser-known works, such as Jupiter Lights and “Sister St. Luke.” We particularly welcome work that examines Woolson in new contexts, perhaps in connection with twentieth-century and/or non-American writers or utilizing new theoretical approaches.

Please send a 200-250 word abstract to Anne Boyd Rioux (aeboyd@uno.edu) by January 25.

CFP: Margaret Fuller Society at ALA (Deadline: 1.19.2019)

The Margaret Fuller Society at ALA
(Boston, May 23-26, 2019)

Deadline for submissions:

Saturday, January 19, 2019

1) Margaret Fuller’s Languages
In the “Preface by the Translator” that Margaret Fuller penned for her translation of Goethe’s Tasso, she states: “There are difficulties attending the translation of German works into English which might baffle one much more skillful in the use of the latter than myself. A great variety of compound words enable the German writer to give a degree of precision and delicacy of shading to his expressions nearly impracticable with the terse, the dignified, but by no means flexible English idiom” (Art, Literature and the Drama, p. 355). In her work as critic and translator, Fuller has always been attuned to style, register, nuances, wording, irony and all the richness and complexity of language, and to the particularities of different languages. As a result, readers have often been “baffled” by her  complexity. 
For this panel, we seek presentations on all matters that have to do with Margaret Fuller’s  languages, both in terms of her translation work, but also regarding her code-switching, generic mixes, neologisms, rhetorical force, word-play.  How do Fuller’s theories about translation and her ideas about language/languages inform her writing? How have recent transnational perspectives on American Literature shed new light on Fuller’s rhetoric and language? 

Please send a 250 word abstract and a brief bio to Sonia Di Loreto (sonia.diloreto@unito.it) by January 19, 2019.

2) Winged Sphinxes: Margaret Fuller’s Poetry and Poetics

In his “Introduction” to a special forum on poetry in J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists (Spring 2013), Max Cavitch states “The study of nineteenth-century American poetry and poetics has been enjoying an efflorescence that shows no signs of contracting”, adding also that “among the most consequential developments has been the belated recognition of not simply the existence but also the centrality to North American literary and cultural history of poetry by women”. In keeping with this appraisal, the present  panel invites examinations of Margaret Fuller’s poetry and poetics from a wide array of critical approaches, including, but not limited to, historical poetics, ecocriticism, new materialisms, as well as linguistic, historical, ethical, feminist, transatlantic, transnational perspectives. We invite contributions that will consider Fuller’s poetry and poetics in their various forms and instantiations (original compositions, translations, embedded poems, quotations, etc.), and we welcome proposals that approach Fuller along with other writers and poets. 

Please send a 250 word abstract and a brief bio to Sonia Di Loreto (sonia.diloreto@unito.it) by January 19, 2019.

The American Literature Association’s 30th annual conference will meet at the Westin Copley Place in Boston on May 23-26, 2019.  For further information, please consult the ALA website at www.americanliterature.org or contact the conference director, Professor Olivia Carr Edenfield at carr@georgiasouthern.edu with specific questions.

CFP: SSAWW at ALA (New Deadline: 1.11.2019)

Call for Papers: SSAWW at the American Literature Association Conference

The American Literature Association will host its thirtieth annual conference from May 23-26, 2019, at the Westin Copley Place in Boston, MA. As we continue to both promote and advance the study of American women writers, SSAWW will once again organize panels for this exciting and informative event:

Panel I: Digital Humanities and the Study of American Women Writers—Digital humanities initiatives are becoming increasingly popular in the field today, allowing students and scholars alike more opportunities to critically engage with women writers across time. The planning meeting for a digital recovery hub as well as the development of a number of sessions from a DH lens at the 2018 SSAWW Triennial Conference speak to this trend—all the more important as we work to recover authors whose works are unfortunately out of print, limiting their accessibility and potentially the spread of their invaluable perspectives on topics that have invariably shaped our society. In an effort to increase digital humanities work and awareness through SSAWW, this panel invites proposals that explore DH projects on women writers from across the Americas as well as methods for increasing student/public engagement with such authors through DH initiatives in the classroom and beyond.

Panel II: Globalizing American Women Writers—In addition to our interests in expanding DH awareness and work through SSAWW, we are equally interested in thinking about American women writers (AWW) on a much more global scale, including pedagogical innovations for teaching AWW abroad, scholarship on the role and impact of AWW outside of the confines of the United States, transatlantic connections, and more. As we come to better understand the overarching significance of such writers and their ideas on identity, culture, nationhood, politics, and self, these conversations remain vital in comprehending the world in which we live. The legacy of AWW, after all, is much farther reaching than the corners of North America, prompting this continued conversation from the 2018 SSAWW Triennial Conference. Still fueled by our 2017 international conference at the Université Bordeaux Montaigne, we are interested in papers that seek to globalize AWW.

Please send proposals of no more than five hundred words (for papers approximately fifteen minutes in length) to the Vice President of Development at ssaww.vpdevelopment@gmail.com no later than January 11, 2019. In addition, please indicate any A/V needs in your E-mail submission. Note that presenters must be members of SSAWW by January 28, 2018 in order to secure their place on the program.