CFP: Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society at ALA 2019 (Deadline: 1.15.2019)

CALL FOR PAPERS – Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society

2019 American Literature Association Conference,

May 23-26, 2019, Westin Copley Hotel, Boston, MA

Send 200 word abstracts to Lisa West, lisa.west@drake.edu by January 15, 2019.

Catharine Maria Sedgwick and the Gothic or Supernatural

While Sedgwick is associated with Federalist politics, reason, republican sensibility, and moral leadership, her writings do venture into the gothic, the uncanny, the supernatural, and the enchanted.  This panel will explore the underexamined ways Sedgwick uses the gothic and the supernatural in her fiction and other writings.  Panelists are encouraged to consider ways she responds to a transatlantic gothic tradition or to think about the religious supernatural. Panelists can build on ideas and papers presented at 2018 ALA or SSAWW.  Papers are also welcome on writers who are contemporaries of Sedgwick, such as Washington Irving or Lydia Maria Child. Send 200-word abstracts to Lisa West, lisa.west@drake.edu by January 15, 2019.

The Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society is sponsoring a roundtable on:

Sedgwick’s Letters: Material Letters, Transcribed Letters, Fictional Letters, Digitized Letters.

This roundtable will put the exciting work of the Catharine Maria Sedgwick Online Letter  (CMSOL) Project in conversation with theoretical approaches to “the letter” in a variety of contexts.  CMSOL is an ongoing initiative with the goal of making the correspondence of Sedgwick held at the Massachusetts Historical Society publicly available in digitized form.  This project is significant not only in developing the scholarly infrastructure of Sedgwick Studies but also in linking archives, scholars, and the general public.  The project raises numerous ethical and pragmatic issues about reading, transcribing, and editing letters.  We welcome short presentations on Sedgwick’s (or her contemporaries’) personal letters, letters embedded within novels, letters from abroad, or references to letters.  Scholarly challenges in working with letters or family papers also welcome, as are presentations that consider the role of letter-writing within a broader literary culture.  Send 200-word abstracts to Lisa West, lisa.west@drake.edu by January 15, 2019.

 

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CFP: Lydia Maria Child Society at ALA (Deadline extended: 1.25.2018)

CFP:  Lydia Maria Child Society

American Literature Association Conference in San Francisco, CA
24 – 27 May 2018 at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco, 5 Embarcadero
(URL: americanliteratureassociation.org/ala-conferences/ala-annual-conference/)

The Lydia Maria Child Society welcomes proposals for a roundtable and for an open-topic panel at the annual American Literature Association Conference in San Francisco, CA, at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco.

 Social Justice Pedagogy Roundtable

The Lydia Maria Child Society seeks participants for a roundtable on pedagogy, social justice, and American literature. Considering contemporary social justice concerns ranging from the Black Lives Matter movement to the Dakota Access Pipeline controversy to persistent gender inequities and xenophobia made all too apparent by the 2016 presidential election and the resulting anti-woman and anti-immigrant policies, the Child Society feels strongly that many of the issues for which Child fought so passionately remain deeply relevant today. To honor her lifelong commitment to both education and writing as ways to attain social change, we ask that our selected panelists prepare brief presentations on how they address the above issues and/or others within the literature classroom, before engaging in what we hope will be a fruitful and wide-ranging open discussion on social justice pedagogies and American literature. What texts and social issues have proved particularly pertinent to your students’ lived experiences of activism, marginalization, etc.? How do you productively draw parallels between the concerns of the literary works you teach and those we are facing in the world outside the classroom? What specific lesson plans, textual pairings/groupings, and/or other pedagogical approaches might you recommend to colleagues striving to make their syllabi and classrooms more socially conscious and engaged?

Please send 200-word abstracts of your proposed presentation, as Word documents, to lydiamariachildsociety@gmail.com by January 25, 2018.  Note that while we, of course, welcome proposals that engage with Child’s work, Child need not be included for your proposal to be considered.

Open-Topic Panel on Child

The Lydia Maria Child Society values sharing ideas about Lydia Maria Child and her work, particularly the work that has spoken the most to you.  We therefore welcome for our open-topic panel proposals that engage with any aspect of Child’s personal or professional life and endeavors.  Possible topics include:

·       Child and food/cooking

·       Child and animals

·       Child and the Civil War

·       Child and radical democracy/activism

·       Child and politics, especially in relation to current issues

·       Child’s journalism and editorship

·       Child and education

·       Child and the arts (theater, music, visual arts, etc.)

·       Child’s influence on her contemporaries

·       Child’s influence on later writers

·       Child in the K – 12 classroom, continuing education, and beyond

·       Child in the community (local, state, national, international)

Please send 250-word abstracts and a brief CV, as Word documents, to lydiamariachildsociety@gmail.com and to sburr@nmu.edu by January 25, 2018.

CFP: Constance Fenimore Woolson Society at ALA (Deadline extended to 1.15.2018)

The Constance Fenimore Woolson Society is extending the deadline for proposals for the ALA 2018 conference in San Francisco to January 15, 2018. Please feel free to send along any and all proposals that you feel would fit our “disappearing women” panel for both Woolson and/or her contemporaries. I have pasted the current CFP below:

The Constance Fenimore Woolson Society is seeking proposals on the theme of “disappearing women” for the annual ALA conference in San Francisco, May 24-27. In this vein, we encourage papers about Woolson and/or her contemporaries that might cover but are not limited to the following subjects: 

· Recovered women writers in the classroom  

· Recovered women writers in the canon 

· ‘Disappearing’ women writers in the literary canon

· Social invisibility in the Nineteenth Century 

· Narratives of disappearance 

· Women writers and archival absence

Please send a brief email by January 15, 2018 to jmafleming@utexas.edu introducing yourself and telling us about what you would like to discuss. We highly encourage unconventional presentations rather than standard conference papers. 

CFP: Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society at ALA (Deadline 1.15.2018)

Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society

Call for Papers

American Literature Association Conference

San Francisco, CA May 24-27, 2018

SESSION 1: Roundtable: Sedgwick and American Enchantment

The Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society calls for 5-7 scholars to participate in a roundtable discussion of Michelle Sizemore’s recently published American Enchantment: Rituals of the People in the Post-Revolutionary World (Oxford UP, November 2017). Participants do not need to focus on the discussions of Sedgwick in the final chapter but instead can address Sizemore’s treatment of any of the central authors (such as Hawthorne, Irving, Brackenridge, and Brown); the significance of this scholarship on Sedgwick Studies; and/or key issues in Sizemore’s work, such as thinking of “the people” as a process rather than as a substance or understanding “enchantment” as a contingent state of embodied cognition.

A description of the book is as follows: The demise of the monarchy and the bodily absence of a King caused a representational crisis in the early republic, forcing the American people to reconstruct the social symbolic order in a new and unfamiliar way. Social historians have routinely understood the Revolution and the early republic as projects dedicated to and productive of reason, with “the people” as an orderly and sensible collective at odds with the volatile and unthinking crowd. American Enchantment rejects this traditionally held vision of a rational public sphere, arguing that early Americans dealt with the post-monarchical crisis by engaging in “civil mysticism,” not systematic discussion and debate. By evaluating a wide range of social and political rituals and literary and cultural discourses, Sizemore shows how “enchantment” becomes a vital mode of enacting the people after the demise of traditional monarchical forms. In works by Charles Brockden Brown, Washington Irving, Catharine Sedgwick, and Nathaniel Hawthorne–as well as in Delaware oral histories, accounts of George Washington’s inauguration, and Methodist conversion narratives–enchantment is an experience uniquely capable of producing new forms of popular power and social affiliation. Recognizing the role of enchantment in constituting the people overturns some of the most common-sense assumptions in the post-revolutionary world: above all, that the people are not simply a flesh-and-blood substance, but also a mystical force.

Please send a brief abstract (200 words) outlining your intended focus in the roundtable to Lisa West, lisa.west@drake.edu, by January 15, 2018.

 


 

Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society

Call for Papers

American Literature Association Conference

San Francisco, CA May 24-27, 2018

SESSION 2: Panel: Sedgwick (and others) Beyond Unitarianism

The Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society seeks papers that invite discussion of religion in Sedgwick’s life and writing. In particular, the society hopes to complicate an understanding of Sedgwick’s Unitarian beliefs; call attention to her use of a variety of religious affiliations and doctrines; consider the role of secularism in her work; and investigate connections between religion, education, morality, and fiction. Papers that address contemporaries of Sedgwick, particularly other women writers or religious theorists, will also be considered. Please send an abstract of 250 words to Lisa West, lisa.west@drake.edu, by January 15, 2018.

CFP: The Margaret Fuller Society at ALA (Deadline 1.15.2018)

The Margaret Fuller Society

invites proposals for two panels

at the American Literature Association Conference

San Francisco, May 24-27, 2018

 

Margaret Fuller: In the Classroom and Beyond

We invite submissions that address teaching Fuller in any academic context or in venues outside of the traditional classroom.

 

Margaret Fuller: Out of New England

We invite submissions that address such topics as:

  • Fuller and the West
  • Fuller and the East
  • Fuller and regionalism
  • Fuller and New York/Paris/Rome
  • Fuller and transnationalism or cosmopolitanism
  • Fuller and translation

We especiially welcome proposals that approach Fuller along with other writers.

Please send a one-page proposal to Charlene Avallone avallone000@gmail.com by 15 January 2018

CFP: Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society at ALA (Deadline: 12.31.2017)

The Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society is seeking submissions to a panel at the annual ALA conference in San Francisco (May 24-27, 2018).

“Embodiment and Charlotte Perkins Gilman”

Despite a career-spanning insistence on the spiritual value of collective humanity, the writings of Charlotte Perkins Gilman often take a turn toward the exploration of individual embodiment. In her autobiography, Gilman attests to a “life-long interest in physical culture” and recounts many of her life’s events through somatic experience. In another instance, she recalls a doctor’s praise for having depicted so thoroughly the physical experience of nervous breakdown in “The Yellow Wall-Paper.” This session invites papers that explore Gilman’s fascination with the physical body and her simultaneous investment in and resistance to individualized embodiment. This panel’s selected papers should contribute to a better understanding of themes of embodiment and corporeality in Gilman’s writings. They may also illuminate Gilman’s and/or other writers’ enmeshment in scientific, medical and popular treatments of the body in late nineteenth and early twentieth century culture. Additionally, this panel encourages pedagogical approaches to embodiment and similar themes in the works of Gilman and other contemporary authors.

Submit 250 to 500-word abstracts and a CV, by December 31, 2017, to Hannah Huber, University of South Carolina,  athhuber@email.sc.edu.

For more information about the conference, please visit the ALA website at www.americanliterature.org.

CFP: Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society at ALA, (Deadline 1.15.2018)

Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society

Call for Papers

American Literature Association Conference

San Francisco, CA May 24-27, 2018

SESSION 1: Roundtable: Sedgwick and American Enchantment

The Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society calls for 5-7 scholars to participate in a roundtable discussion of Michelle Sizemore’s recently published American Enchantment: Rituals of the People in the Post-Revolutionary World (Oxford UP, November 2017). Participants do not need to focus on the discussions of Sedgwick in the final chapter but instead can address Sizemore’s treatment of any of the central authors (such as Hawthorne, Irving, Brackenridge, and Brown); the significance of this scholarship on Sedgwick Studies; and/or key issues in Sizemore’s work, such as thinking of “the people” as a process rather than as a substance or understanding “enchantment” as a contingent state of embodied cognition.

A description of the book is as follows: The demise of the monarchy and the bodily absence of a King caused a representational crisis in the early republic, forcing the American people to reconstruct the social symbolic order in a new and unfamiliar way. Social historians have routinely understood the Revolution and the early republic as projects dedicated to and productive of reason, with “the people” as an orderly and sensible collective at odds with the volatile and unthinking crowd. American Enchantment rejects this traditionally held vision of a rational public sphere, arguing that early Americans dealt with the post-monarchical crisis by engaging in “civil mysticism,” not systematic discussion and debate. By evaluating a wide range of social and political rituals and literary and cultural discourses, Sizemore shows how “enchantment” becomes a vital mode of enacting the people after the demise of traditional monarchical forms. In works by Charles Brockden Brown, Washington Irving, Catharine Sedgwick, and Nathaniel Hawthorne–as well as in Delaware oral histories, accounts of George Washington’s inauguration, and Methodist conversion narratives–enchantment is an experience uniquely capable of producing new forms of popular power and social affiliation. Recognizing the role of enchantment in constituting the people overturns some of the most common-sense assumptions in the post-revolutionary world: above all, that the people are not simply a flesh-and-blood substance, but also a mystical force.

Please send a brief abstract (200 words) outlining your intended focus in the roundtable to Lisa West, lisa.west@drake.edu, by January 15, 2018.

 


 

Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society

Call for Papers

American Literature Association Conference

San Francisco, CA May 24-27, 2018

SESSION 2: Panel: Sedgwick (and others) Beyond Unitarianism

The Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society seeks papers that invite discussion of religion in Sedgwick’s life and writing. In particular, the society hopes to complicate an understanding of Sedgwick’s Unitarian beliefs; call attention to her use of a variety of religious affiliations and doctrines; consider the role of secularism in her work; and investigate connections between religion, education, morality, and fiction. Papers that address contemporaries of Sedgwick, particularly other women writers or religious theorists, will also be considered. Please send an abstract of 250 words to Lisa West, lisa.west@drake.edu, by January 15, 2018.