Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society – Summer Webinars (July 31st, August 14th, and August 28th)

The Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society announces a series of webinars featuring new works of Sedgwick scholarship. Invited scholars will discuss their recent monographs and address Sedgwick, her career, and her place in contemporary literary studies.

Webinars are open to the public but registration is required; click the links below to register for each individual event. For more information or to join the Sedgwick Society, visit cmsedgwicksociety.org.

We hope you’ll join us!

Friday, July 31, 2 pm ET

Lydia Fash, author of The Sketch, The Tale, and the Beginnings of American Literature (University of Virginia Press, 2020)

Joe Shapiro, author of The Illiberal Imagination: Class and the Rise of the U.S. Novel (University of Virginia Press, 2017)

Hosted by Melissa Homestead

Register: https://unl.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_dN07qBmJQ0m2clm7ytYHsA

Friday, August 14, 3 pm ET

Brigitte Bailey, author of American Travel Literature, Gendered Aesthetics and the Italian Tour, 1824-62 (Edinburgh University Press, 2018)

Sandra Wilson Smith, author of The Action-Adventure Heroine: Rediscovering an American Literary Character, 1697-1895 (University of Tennessee Press, 2018)

Hosted by Jenifer Elmore

Register: https://unl.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_dLGWoloFQ-2wrPRuH4rwoA

Friday, August 28, 3 pm ET

Martin Holtz, author of Constructions of Agency in American Literature on the War of Independence: War as Action, 1775-1860 (Routledge, 2019)

Ashley Reed, author of Heaven’s Interpreters: Women Writers and Religious Agency in Nineteenth-Century America (Cornell University Press, 2020)

Hosted by Jordan Von Cannon

Register: https://unl.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_v3Uw9omHQNWMS8cBRQny4w

CFP: Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society Symposium June 2020 (EXTENDED Deadline: 2.24.2020)

Revolutionary Legacies: The Ninth Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society Symposium

June 24-27, 2020

Union College, Schenectady, New York

The Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society invites submissions for its ninth symposium, titled Revolutionary Legacies. The Symposium will take place June 24-27 on the beautiful campus of Union College in Schenectady, New York, and will honor both the Sedgwick family’s ties to the Albany and Hudson River regions and the area’s role in America’s many revolutions.

Although Catharine Sedgwick is strongly associated with the Berkshires region of Massachusetts, the Albany region was important to her family as well. Her father, Theodore Sedgwick, had strong ties to Philip Schuyler, who served as a General in the Revolutionary War and whose grand mansion looms over the Hudson River, and to Alexander Hamilton, one of Schuyler’s sons-in-law. Catharine’s brother Theodore practiced law in Albany and her sister Frances lived there with her husband. Catharine herself briefly attended school in the city and as an adult visited frequently, including passing through on her way to Saratoga Springs and points west and north. Sedgwick often portrayed the Albany and Hudson River Valley region in her fiction: characters in RedwoodClarence, and The Travellers reside in or travel through it. Most significantly, in her Revolutionary War novel The Linwoods, Sedgwick locates key events in the Hudson River Valley.

The organizers of the Sedgwick Symposium invite papers that address any aspect of Sedgwick’s life and works, including but not limited to Catharine’s or her family’s ties to Albany and the Hudson River Valley. We also welcome proposals on other topics connected to the area or to the conference theme. Potential topics might include:

  • Literary engagements with the American Revolution by Sedgwick or other authors—including non-US authors
  • Women’s participation in the American Revolution, including nonwhite women’s experiences of war
  • Travel and tourism in New York and Canada in the era of the “fashionable tour”
  • Immigration, settlement, and native displacement in upstate New York
  • Abolitionism, women’s rights, and other reforms (2020 is the centennial of the 19th Amendment, with its roots in nearby Seneca Falls)
  • Religious revolutions of the Second Great Awakening, including those in New York’s “burnt-over district”
  • Dutch colonial legacies in early U.S. literature
  • Slavery and its aftermath in the state of New York
  • Women’s education in the early republic and antebellum America
  • Arts and culture of the Hudson Valley region, from the Hudson River School to today
  • The American Revolution in recent popular culture: HamiltonTurnTabooSleepy HollowPoldark, etc.
  • Strategies for teaching the works of Sedgwick and her contemporaries
  • Early American literature in the digital age

Send proposals of no more than 250 words to Ashley Reed (akreed@vt.edu) by (extended) February 24, 2020. We’re trying to get an initial head count of attendees as soon as possible, if you can email and let us know that you plan to submit a proposal by February 24th.

CFP: Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society Symposium June 2020 (Deadline: 2.17.2020)

Revolutionary Legacies: The Ninth Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society Symposium

June 24-27, 2020

Union College, Schenectady, New York

The Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society invites submissions for its ninth symposium, titled Revolutionary Legacies. The Symposium will take place June 24-27 on the beautiful campus of Union College in Schenectady, New York, and will honor both the Sedgwick family’s ties to the Albany and Hudson River regions and the area’s role in America’s many revolutions.

Although Catharine Sedgwick is strongly associated with the Berkshires region of Massachusetts, the Albany region was important to her family as well. Her father, Theodore Sedgwick, had strong ties to Philip Schuyler, who served as a General in the Revolutionary War and whose grand mansion looms over the Hudson River, and to Alexander Hamilton, one of Schuyler’s sons-in-law. Catharine’s brother Theodore practiced law in Albany and her sister Frances lived there with her husband. Catharine herself briefly attended school in the city and as an adult visited frequently, including passing through on her way to Saratoga Springs and points west and north. Sedgwick often portrayed the Albany and Hudson River Valley region in her fiction: characters in RedwoodClarence, and The Travellers reside in or travel through it. Most significantly, in her Revolutionary War novel The Linwoods, Sedgwick locates key events in the Hudson River Valley. 

The organizers of the Sedgwick Symposium invite papers that address any aspect of Sedgwick’s life and works, including but not limited to Catharine’s or her family’s ties to Albany and the Hudson River Valley. We also welcome proposals on other topics connected to the area or to the conference theme. Potential topics might include:

  • Literary engagements with the American Revolution by Sedgwick or other authors—including non-US authors
  • Women’s participation in the American Revolution, including nonwhite women’s experiences of war
  • Travel and tourism in New York and Canada in the era of the “fashionable tour”
  • Immigration, settlement, and native displacement in upstate New York
  • Abolitionism, women’s rights, and other reforms (2020 is the centennial of the 19th Amendment, with its roots in nearby Seneca Falls)
  • Religious revolutions of the Second Great Awakening, including those in New York’s “burnt-over district”
  • Dutch colonial legacies in early U.S. literature
  • Slavery and its aftermath in the state of New York
  • Women’s education in the early republic and antebellum America
  • Arts and culture of the Hudson Valley region, from the Hudson River School to today
  • The American Revolution in recent popular culture: HamiltonTurnTabooSleepy HollowPoldark, etc.
  • Strategies for teaching the works of Sedgwick and her contemporaries
  • Early American literature in the digital age

Send proposals of no more than 250 words to Ashley Reed (akreed@vt.edu) by February 17, 2020.

Texas Regional SSAWW Study Group – Spring 2020 meeting (Saturday, Feb 29)

The Spring 2020 meeting of the Texas Regional SSAWW Study Group is coming up soon: Saturday February 29 at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, hosted by Sarah Salter. The common reading will be Leonor Villegas de Magnón’s The Rebel, an autobiography originally written in Spanish in the 1920s but unpublished until Arte Publico’s editions in 1994/2004. Available here: https://artepublicopress.com/product/the-rebel/

Please RSVP to Sarah by February 1 at: sarah.salter@tamucc.edu and please indicate whether you will attend the dinner.

More details regarding the schedule, location, lodging, etc. are available at our website: http://txssaww.wordpress.com/

This year, our meeting coincides with a wonderful local event: During the February meeting, TAMU-CC and Del Mar Community College will be hosting the South Texas People’s Poetry Fest (Feb. 27-29). This festival, now in its fifth year, collects writers of poetry from faculty, student, and professional communities across the region.

The Study Group is an informal gathering of professors, graduate students, and independent scholars who share an interest in American women’s writing. We share a lunch (provided by the host campus), spend the afternoon discussing the common reading, and have dinner at a local restaurant (paid individually). We welcome new participants to join the conversation, which is always rich and stimulating, and often touches on larger professional concerns (teaching, publishing, mentoring, etc.).
Please help us spread the word by circulating this announcement to your colleagues and graduate students.

Dr. Desirée Henderson

Associate Professor, Dept. of English

University of Texas Arlington

CFP: Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society Symposium June 2020 (Deadline: 2.17.2020)

Revolutionary Legacies: The Ninth Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society Symposium

June 24-27, 2020

Union College, Schenectady, New York

The Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society invites submissions for its ninth symposium, titled Revolutionary Legacies. The Symposium will take place June 24-27 on the beautiful campus of Union College in Schenectady, New York, and will honor both the Sedgwick family’s ties to the Albany and Hudson River regions and the area’s role in America’s many revolutions.

Although Catharine Sedgwick is strongly associated with the Berkshires region of Massachusetts, the Albany region was important to her family as well. Her father, Theodore Sedgwick, had strong ties to Philip Schuyler, who served as a General in the Revolutionary War and whose grand mansion looms over the Hudson River, and to Alexander Hamilton, one of Schuyler’s sons-in-law. Catharine’s brother Theodore practiced law in Albany and her sister Frances lived there with her husband. Catharine herself briefly attended school in the city and as an adult visited frequently, including passing through on her way to Saratoga Springs and points west and north. Sedgwick often portrayed the Albany and Hudson River Valley region in her fiction: characters in RedwoodClarence, and The Travellers reside in or travel through it. Most significantly, in her Revolutionary War novel The Linwoods, Sedgwick locates key events in the Hudson River Valley. 

The organizers of the Sedgwick Symposium invite papers that address any aspect of Sedgwick’s life and works, including but not limited to Catharine’s or her family’s ties to Albany and the Hudson River Valley. We also welcome proposals on other topics connected to the area or to the conference theme. Potential topics might include:

  • Literary engagements with the American Revolution by Sedgwick or other authors—including non-US authors
  • Women’s participation in the American Revolution, including nonwhite women’s experiences of war
  • Travel and tourism in New York and Canada in the era of the “fashionable tour”
  • Immigration, settlement, and native displacement in upstate New York
  • Abolitionism, women’s rights, and other reforms (2020 is the centennial of the 19th Amendment, with its roots in nearby Seneca Falls)
  • Religious revolutions of the Second Great Awakening, including those in New York’s “burnt-over district”
  • Dutch colonial legacies in early U.S. literature
  • Slavery and its aftermath in the state of New York
  • Women’s education in the early republic and antebellum America
  • Arts and culture of the Hudson Valley region, from the Hudson River School to today
  • The American Revolution in recent popular culture: HamiltonTurnTabooSleepy HollowPoldark, etc.
  • Strategies for teaching the works of Sedgwick and her contemporaries
  • Early American literature in the digital age

Send proposals of no more than 250 words to Ashley Reed (akreed@vt.edu) by February 17, 2020.

CFP: Emily Dickinson International Society (Deadline: 1.31.2020)

“‘Stratford on Avon’ – accept us all!”— Dickinson and Shakespeare

2020 Emily Dickinson International Society (EDIS) Annual Meeting

William Shakespeare was Emily Dickinson’s favorite writer and her letters abound with references to him and his works. Dickinson’s allusions to Shakespeare’s writings evidence his pervasive presence in her life but also signal his ubiquitous place in her culture.

In collaboration with the Emily Dickinson Museum, the 2020 EDIS Annual Meeting will be held July 31 to August 1 in Amherst. This year’s focus is Dickinson’s great love of Shakespeare and this theme will shape the usual features of our Annual Meetings such as reading groups, tours of the Dickinson Museum, performances, readings, seminar-style discussions, and talks.

We welcome papers that discuss any aspects of Dickinson’s reading of or response to Shakespeare, or that compare Dickinson’s and Shakespeare’s writings. We are also interested in papers that consider Shakespeare’s place in Dickinson’s society and literary culture, and especially his place in 19th century popular culture, theater, education and print culture. We also welcome papers that examine how Dickinson’s contemporaries engaged with Shakespeare.

We hope that the topic of Shakespeare provides a generative way of approaching Dickinson and offers many opportunities for participants, especially postgraduate students and early career academics, to consider this topic across disciplines.

Please send abstracts (300 words), with a short bio (100 words), to Adeline Chevrier-Bosseau (achevrier.bosseau@gmail.com) and Páraic Finnerty (paraic.finnerty@port.ac.uk) by 31 January, 2020.

Texas Regional SSAWW Study Group: Save the Date

The Spring 2020 meeting of the Texas Regional SSAWW Study Group will take place on Saturday February 29, 2020 at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, hosted by Sarah Salter. The common reading will be Leonor Villegas de Magnón’s The Rebel, an autobiographyoriginally written in Spanish in the 1920s but unpublished until Arte Publico’s editions in 1994/2004. Participants are invited to read the text in either of its editions; the English-language edition is available here: https://artepublicopress.com/product/the-rebel/

RSVP by February 1, 2020 by emailing Sarah Salter (sarah.salter@tamucc.edu), and please indicate whether you will stay for dinner.

More details regarding location, lodging, parking, etc. will be available at our website as the event gets closer: http://txssaww.wordpress.com/ The Study Group is an informal gathering of professors, graduate students, and independent scholars who share an interest in American women’s writing. We share a lunch (provided by the host campus), spend the afternoon discussing the common reading, and have dinner at a local restaurant (paid individually). We welcome new participants to join the conversation, which is always rich and stimulating, and often touches on larger professional concerns (teaching, publishing, mentoring, etc.).

CFP: Edith Wharton’s New York; Sponsored by the Edith Wharton Society (Deadline: 8.1.2019)

CFP: Edith Wharton’s New York:
A Conference Sponsored by the Edith Wharton Society
New Yorker Hotel
June 17th-20th 2020

 

Please join the Edith Wharton Society for its upcoming conference marking the centennial anniversary of the publication of Edith Wharton’s Pulitzer-Prize winning novel, The Age of Innocence. We will celebrate this momentous year in New York, the setting not only of so many of Wharton’s works but also of much of her life.

While all topics are welcome, we are particularly interested in whole panels and individual papers that focus on New York as a geographical and thematic element in Wharton’s life and works. Papers could explore the role of New York City and/or the Hudson River Valley in Wharton’s works, Wharton’s own history with the region, or Wharton’s relationship to place and space more generally. Papers that offer new readings of The Age of Innocence—such as new historical approaches or legacies of The Age of Innocence, the novel’s relationship to other works by Wharton and/or her peers, and adaptations of the novel (for film, theater, etc.)—are also welcome.

Since 1920 marks the beginning of what many consider the “later years” of Wharton’s career, examinations of Edith Wharton’s works in the shifting literary and political foundations of postWWI society are also of interest. The 20s mark the centennial of other significant Wharton texts, and essays that examine these later works are of particular interest.

In addition, there will be a keynote speaker and opportunities for tours of local attractions. Further details forthcoming.

We welcome submissions for full panels of 4-5 participants and roundtables of 6-7 participants as well as individual paper submissions. Please submit proposals no later than August 1st, 2019 to whartonnewyork@gmail.com

For full panel and roundtable proposals, please submit 200-350-word summaries of each presentation included in the panel or roundtable as well as a brief 50-word bio and A/V requests for each presenter

For individual paper proposals, please submit a 350-500-word abstract, a brief 50-word bio, and A/V requests as one Word document.

All conference participants must be members of the Edith Wharton Society at the time of registration.

For additional information, contact co-directors at email address above or individually:
Margaret Toth (Meg), Manhattan College margaret.toth@manhattan.edu
Margaret Jay Jessee (Jay), University of Alabama at Birmingham mjjessee@uab.edu

CFP: Margaret Fuller Society – Special Conversations issue in Honor of Jeffrey Steele (Deadline: 8.1.2018)

Call for Submissions:

Special Conversations issue in Honor of Jeffrey Steele

 We are planning to dedicate the next issue (Fall 2018) of Conversations: The Newsletter of the Margaret Fuller Society to our late colleague, Jeff Steele, a founding member of the Margaret Fuller Society and former president. We wish to pay tribute to Jeff’s life, scholarship, and legacy in this issue.

Jeff’s work extended far beyond the reaches of the Margaret Fuller Society, and so I am inviting submissions from those of you who knew Jeff personally, those who worked with him, and/or those who were shaped by his work. The more contributions we receive, the better we will be able to honor Jeff. This is an open call for submissions, which may take many forms, including:

·      personal recollections

·      a critical assessment/review of one or more of Jeff’s books/articles

·      photographs

·      information on Jeff’s role in the early formation and growth of the Margaret Fuller Society and/or his further contributions to the society (or any other society in which he was active, including SSAWW)

·      a critical essay of your own which draws on Jeff’s ideas and scholarship

·      an exploration of how you may have used The Essential Margaret Fuller in the classroom

·      any other ideas that you may have as to how we can honor Jeff in this issue of Conversations

Details on How to Contribute:

·      Submissions and ideas should be sent to Katie Kornacki, Editor of Conversations, at kkornacki@caldwell.edu with “newsletter” in the subject line

·      Submissions received by August 1, 2018 will be considered

·      You can view past issues of Conversations on the Margaret Fuller Society website: https://margaretfullersociety.org/newsletter/

CFP: Catherine O’Flaherty Chopin’s Irish Eyes Panel co-sponsored by the Kate Chopin International Society (Deadline 10.6.2017)

Call for Papers: Catherine O’Flaherty Chopin’s Irish Eyes

Panel co-sponsored by the Kate Chopin International Society,

Transatlantic Women 3 Conference: Women of the Green Atlantic

Dublin, Ireland Royal Irish Academy

21-22 June 2018

Before we knew her as Kate Chopin, the author of The Awakening was christened Catherine O’Flaherty by her parents, Eliza Faris and Thomas O’Flaherty, the latter of whom emigrated to America from County Galway, Ireland. Given that O’Flaherty died when Chopin was very young, that Chopin was raised by maternal relatives of French descent, that she grew up in a city originally part of the Louisiana territory and named after a French Catholic saint, and that she married into a French family, much of Chopin scholarship has focused on French and French-American influences in her life and fiction. However, around the time Chopin was born in 1850, nearly 10,000 Irish emigrated to St. Louis in yet a second wave of nineteenth-century Irish immigration to America. The neighborhood of Kerry Patch developed to the city’s north, and parish churches such as St. Patrick’s, St. Bridget of Erin, and St. Lawrence O’Toole served a growing Irish population. When she died in 1904, Chopin lived on a street with an Irish surname: McPherson Avenue.

In keeping with the Transatlantic Women 3 conference theme, this panel invites papers that consider “Irish/American crosscurrents of the long nineteenth century” that might have influenced Chopin’s view of the world. How might we theorize the degree to which Ireland’s legacy—both in Europe and America—influenced the fiction Chopin bequeathed to us?  Papers may address any topic related to Chopin as part of “the Irish-American nexus,” including but not limited to: Irish history in St. Louis; Chopin’s Irish relatives, friends, and contacts; or Irish characters in her fiction.

Please send abstracts of 250 words to Bonnie Shaker, bshaker@kent.edu, on or before 6 October 2017. Conference details may be found in the Transatlantic Women 3 link, above.