CFP: SSAWW at 2020 ALA (2 panels) Deadline: 1.15.2020

Call for Papers: Society for the Study of American Women Writers at the 2020 American Literature Association conference

SSAWW will sponsor two panels at the 2020 American Literature Association Conference, one on “Toni Morrison and Her Legacy” and one on “Women’s Rights, Women’s Suffrage.”

“Toni Morrison and Her Legacy”

The profound loss of a defining voice of American women’s writing demands our attention as we consider the work of women writers of the past and present.   We invite papers which engage with Morrison’s writing, her work in relation to other women writers, and her legacy as a defining figure in American literature.

“Women’s Rights, Women’s Suffrage

In 1920, the 19th Amendment, giving women the right to vote, was ratified.  One hundred years later, women in the United States are still at the center of women-led battles like the #MeToo movement and #SayHerName, causes that define a generation in the 21st century.  In these past and present struggles, how have women writers held social and political powers accountable through their stories, novels, memoirs, essays, journalism, blogs, and other writings?

Papers might explore, for example, how women writers addressed the opportunities and limits of women’s suffrage, or how differently situated women writers have engaged past and present struggles, considering changing definitions of women and changing technologies available to them (and to us).

We welcome proposals on subjects related to those themes.

Proposals may be up to 250 words and must be submitted by January 15, 2020.

Proposals should be submitted no later than January 15, 2020 to

Ellen Gruber Garvey, Vice President for Development (ssaww.vpdevelopment@gmail.com)

CFP: Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society Symposium June 2020 (Deadline: 2.17.2020)

Revolutionary Legacies: The Ninth Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society Symposium

June 24-27, 2020

Union College, Schenectady, New York

The Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society invites submissions for its ninth symposium, titled Revolutionary Legacies. The Symposium will take place June 24-27 on the beautiful campus of Union College in Schenectady, New York, and will honor both the Sedgwick family’s ties to the Albany and Hudson River regions and the area’s role in America’s many revolutions.

Although Catharine Sedgwick is strongly associated with the Berkshires region of Massachusetts, the Albany region was important to her family as well. Her father, Theodore Sedgwick, had strong ties to Philip Schuyler, who served as a General in the Revolutionary War and whose grand mansion looms over the Hudson River, and to Alexander Hamilton, one of Schuyler’s sons-in-law. Catharine’s brother Theodore practiced law in Albany and her sister Frances lived there with her husband. Catharine herself briefly attended school in the city and as an adult visited frequently, including passing through on her way to Saratoga Springs and points west and north. Sedgwick often portrayed the Albany and Hudson River Valley region in her fiction: characters in RedwoodClarence, and The Travellers reside in or travel through it. Most significantly, in her Revolutionary War novel The Linwoods, Sedgwick locates key events in the Hudson River Valley. 

The organizers of the Sedgwick Symposium invite papers that address any aspect of Sedgwick’s life and works, including but not limited to Catharine’s or her family’s ties to Albany and the Hudson River Valley. We also welcome proposals on other topics connected to the area or to the conference theme. Potential topics might include:

  • Literary engagements with the American Revolution by Sedgwick or other authors—including non-US authors
  • Women’s participation in the American Revolution, including nonwhite women’s experiences of war
  • Travel and tourism in New York and Canada in the era of the “fashionable tour”
  • Immigration, settlement, and native displacement in upstate New York
  • Abolitionism, women’s rights, and other reforms (2020 is the centennial of the 19th Amendment, with its roots in nearby Seneca Falls)
  • Religious revolutions of the Second Great Awakening, including those in New York’s “burnt-over district”
  • Dutch colonial legacies in early U.S. literature
  • Slavery and its aftermath in the state of New York
  • Women’s education in the early republic and antebellum America
  • Arts and culture of the Hudson Valley region, from the Hudson River School to today
  • The American Revolution in recent popular culture: HamiltonTurnTabooSleepy HollowPoldark, etc.
  • Strategies for teaching the works of Sedgwick and her contemporaries
  • Early American literature in the digital age

Send proposals of no more than 250 words to Ashley Reed (akreed@vt.edu) by February 17, 2020.

CFP: Book Chapter Proposals – Emerging Strategies for Public Education Reform (Deadlines: proposals 1.31.202, final chapters 6.15.2020)

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS

Emerging Strategies for Public Education Reform​, ​a book edited by Marquis Carter Grant(Grand Canyon University)

Synopsis

This enhanced version of Equity, Equality, and Reform will revisit current trends and issues in contemporary public education. There will also be opportunities for contributors to highlight emerging topics that have a significant impact on teaching and learning, which may include (but not limited to): the education of English Language Learners, Social Emotional Learning, and revamping teacher education.Objectives of the Book

This book has two objectives. First, to inform the practices of educators, administrators and policy makers so that informed decisions are made at the local, state, federal and global levels.The book is intended to be a volume of current empirical studies, theoretical frameworks, case study analyses, and interventions surrounding the emergent area of public education issues and trends. The field of education is ever-changing, drawing a need for current research. Second, to provide in-depth coverage of concepts and principles, and interdisciplinary perspectives on contemporary public education that will add to the existing scholarship. As such, the aim of this edited book is to provide a quality volume of comprehensive material to academics, researchers,policymakers, and teacher education programs globally.Target Audience

This book can be used as a reference or textbook for public education (teachers, administrators);college/university level educators (professors, administrators, students); state and district level education organizations. This book is appropriate for markets that are specific to education,educational leadership, educational/organizational leadership, education policy making,reformists, education theorists.Recommended topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

1. Equity and equality in public education.

2. Restructuring teacher education

3. Student achievement and poverty

4. Religion and education

5. Culturally responsive teaching

6. Revolutionizing education

7. Social justice in education

8. Addressing the needs of English Language Learners in public schools.

9. Disparities in the educational opportunities of marginalized children.

10. Co-teaching and building collaborative relationships.

11. Gender preferences in STEM education

12. School-to-prison pipeline

13. European education models

14. Special education across the globe

15. Differentiated instruction and the impact on student achievement.

16. The emergence of technology as a primary resource in education.

17. Challenges in reading education.

18. Multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS)

19. Comparative analysis of affluence and poverty on children’s school experiences.

20. Schools as a business.

Submission Procedure Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to this book publication, ​Emerging Strategies for Public Education Reform​. All chapter proposals will be submitted through the ​eEditorial Discovery ®TM online submission manager​.

Publisher

This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), an international academic publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and“Engineering Science Reference” imprints. IGI Global specializes in publishing reference books,scholarly journals, and electronic databases featuring academic research on a variety of innovative topic areas including, but not limited to, education, social science, medicine and healthcare, business and management, information science and technology, engineering, public administration, library and information science, media and communication studies, and environmental science. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visitwww.igi-global.com​. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2020.

Important Dates Schedule of Deadlines

An IGI Global-appointed Development Editor will be contacting you throughout the development process to request progress updates and offer assistance. The dates listed below are meant as a guide to inform you of how long each step is expected to take. You will be free to adjust these dates to conform to your own project, however, the final due date for sending the final manuscript to IGI Global will remain unchanged.

Proposals: January 31, 2020

Full submission: Mar 6, 2020

Review results due to authors: Apr 3, 2020

Revisions due from authors: Apr 17, 2020

Final preface and table of contents: Jun 1, 2020

Final deadline: Jun 15, 2020

Inquiries can be forwarded to:

Marquis C. Grant, EdD Adjunct Professor

College of Education Grand Canyon University

drmarquisgrant4@gmail.com

CFP: Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society at ALA (Deadline: 1.17.2020)

The Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society is seeking submissions to a panel at the annual ALA conference in San Diego (May 21-24, 2020). 

Digital Humanities in Charlotte Perkins Gilman Scholarship

The Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society invites papers to discuss new approaches to the digital in Gilman research and discovery. Digital humanities, as an emerging subfield in literary studies, can be considered an innovative means of approaching Gilman scholarship. Thus, this panel will gather a selection of papers that envision the myriads ways in which digital tools and methods can facilitate new projects that help widen our understanding of Gilman and her era. Topics may include methodological, theoretical, and pedagogical approaches to digitizing Gilman scholarship—particularly through engagements with cultural studies, queer theory, critical race studies, genre studies, and women’s and gender studies, as well as digital visualizations and transmedia representations of women’s writing, reform, recovery, and the archive. 

Please submit a 250-500 word abstract and a CV by January 17, 2020 to Hannah Huber at h1huber@uic.edu.

For more information about the conference, visit https://americanliteratureassociation.org/ala-conferences/ala-annual-conference/.

CFP: SSAWW at 2020 ALA (2 panels) Deadline: 1.15.2020

Call for Papers: Society for the Study of American Women Writers at the 2020 American Literature Association conference

SSAWW will sponsor two panels at the 2020 American Literature Association Conference, one on “Toni Morrison and Her Legacy” and one on “Women’s Rights, Women’s Suffrage.”

“Toni Morrison and Her Legacy”

The profound loss of a defining voice of American women’s writing demands our attention as we consider the work of women writers of the past and present.   We invite papers which engage with Morrison’s writing, her work in relation to other women writers, and her legacy as a defining figure in American literature.

“Women’s Rights, Women’s Suffrage

In 1920, the 19th Amendment, giving women the right to vote, was ratified.  One hundred years later, women in the United States are still at the center of women-led battles like the #MeToo movement and #SayHerName, causes that define a generation in the 21st century.  In these past and present struggles, how have women writers held social and political powers accountable through their stories, novels, memoirs, essays, journalism, blogs, and other writings?

Papers might explore, for example, how women writers addressed the opportunities and limits of women’s suffrage, or how differently situated women writers have engaged past and present struggles, considering changing definitions of women and changing technologies available to them (and to us).

We welcome proposals on subjects related to those themes.

Proposals may be up to 250 words and must be submitted by January 15, 2020.

Proposals should be submitted no later than January 15, 2020 to

Ellen Gruber Garvey, Vice President for Development (ssaww.vpdevelopment@gmail.com)

Society for the Study of American Women Writers

CFP: Un/Tethered Cather on the Cusp of the 1920s, June 4-6, 2020 (Deadline: 2.1.2020)

For Cather and for the nation, the dawn of the 1920s was a tumultuous time, marked by new freedoms and new entanglements. The Great War had ended and women had won the right to vote, but 1919’s Red Summer and Palmer Raids signalled lingering social discord. Into this unsettled world, Willa Cather brought out Youth and the Bright Medusa, her collection of short stories that marked her departure from Houghton Mifflin and launched her long and successful partnership with a new publisher, Alfred Knopf. In the stories of Youth and the Bright Medusa, Cather’s artists move through a world that is by turns inspiring and enervating.

Un/Tethered explores the themes of Youth and the Bright Medusa and the tensions of this time through broad conference offerings, including a keynote lecture by The New Yorker’s Alex Ross, Nebraska film and textile artist Michael Burton’s innovative animation installation based on Cather’s “A Gold Slipper,” a day of insightful scholarly presentations, and a soon-to-be-announced Red Cloud Opera House performance you won’t want to miss.

To mark this important anniversary, we are accepting proposals for papers related to the publication centenary of Youth and the Bright Medusa. Topics to be considered include:

  • Youth and the Bright Medusa’s publication history and that of its individual stories, including the collection’s enigmatic title (and the changes in title and contents)
  • Cather’s fictional world of artists, her insiders and her outsiders, and the tensions between these communities;
  • The notions of escape and return, rule and rebellion, and how these relate to Cather, her artists and their lives;
  • YBM’s historical moment: how does this collection relate to the late 1910s and 1920s and the momentous social and cultural changes of the time? To Cather’s personal history? To today’s social issues?
  • Innovative examples of the teaching of Cather’s work, particularly ideas of cross-curricular, digital, and participatory approaches;
  • Examinations of place, absence, and exile as they relate to culture, art, and intellectualism–both in Cather’s writing and our modern society.

Please send proposals for papers to the National Willa Cather Center’s education specialist, Rachel Olsen, at rolsen@WillaCather.org, by February 1, 2020. Proposals should be 350-500 words. Be sure to include your academic affiliation with the proposal!
Papers will be accepted by March 15, 2020. While there is no set word count, papers should be no longer than twenty minutes when read.

New Books: Faraway Women and the "Atlantic Monthly" by Cathryn Halverson

Author: Cathryn Halverson

Faraway Women and the “Atlantic Monthly”

University of Massachusetts Press, 2019

In the first decades of the twentieth century, famed Atlantic Monthly editor Ellery Sedgwick chose to publish a group of nontraditional writers he later referred to as “Faraway Women,” working-class authors living in the western United States far from his base in Boston. Cathryn Halverson surveys these enormously popular Atlantic contributors, among them a young woman raised in Oregon lumber camps, homesteaders in Wyoming, Idaho, and Alberta, and a world traveler who called Los Angeles and Honolulu home.

Faraway Women and the “Atlantic Monthly” examines gender and power as it charts an archival journey connecting the least remembered writers and readers of the time with one of its most renowned literary figures, Gertrude Stein. It shows how distant friends, patrons, publishers, and readers inspired, fostered, and consumed the innovative life narratives of these unlikely authors, and it also tracks their own strategies for seizing creative outlets and forging new protocols of public expression. Troubling binary categories of east and west, national and regional, and cosmopolitan and local, the book recasts the coordinates of early twentieth-century American literature. (from the publisher’s website)

This book is available for purchase from University of Massachusetts Press: https://www.umass.edu/umpress/title/faraway-women