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Deadline (9/1): “Gender and the Cultural Preoccupations of the American West” (Studies in the Novel)

Call For Papers – Studies in the Novel

Special Issue: “Gender and the Cultural Preoccupations of the American West” 

Deadline for submissions: 9/1/2016

 

Studies in the Novel is currently seeking submissions for a special issue on “Gender and the Cultural Preoccupations of the American West,” guest edited by Sigrid Anderson Cordell (University of Michigan) and Carrie Johnston (Bucknell University), which will be published in fall 2017.

 

This special issue examines the novel as a tool of political engagement through which women writers have challenged prevalent notions of the American West as masculine, antimodern, and untouched. Even thirty years after Annette Kolodny’s foundational study The Land Before Her, recent work by Nina Baym and Krista Comer has shown there is considerable work to be done to account for women writers’ engagement with the West as an imaginative and political space. Likewise, new directions in gender studies, border theory, settler colonialism, and critical regionalism have made new conversations about the Western as a literary genre increasingly urgent.

 

We invite contributions that examine the ways that women novelists have located themselves in the West—both imaginatively and geographically—asking how these narratives have engaged cultural “preoccupations” with the West as an extension of the predominantly white, masculine public sphere. Examining these narratives, contributors will also evaluate gendered representations of the longstanding contested nature of the “occupation” of western territories and, more recently, US borders.

 

Possible topics include:

  • Women’s writing and borderlands
  • Gender and settler colonialism
  • Intersections of post-feminism, the post-western, and the post-racial
  • Novels about the West as spaces for debate
  • New readings of canonical western women writers like Willa Cather and Mary Austin
  • Ways that the critical landscape shifts by paying attention to neglected texts
  • New readings of under-read women writers
  • Women writers and the post-West or post-regionalism
  • Globalization and the novel
  • Visualities in women’s novels about the West
  • The Western novel as a gendered genre
  • The gendering of anthropology in narratives about the West

 

Submissions should be sent in MS Word, devoid of personal identifying information. Manuscripts should be 8,000-10,000 words in length, inclusive of endnotes and Works Cited, have standard formatting (1” margins, double-spaced throughout, etc.), and conform to the latest edition of the MLA Style Manual. Endnotes should be as brief and as limited in number as possible. Illustrations may accompany articles; high-resolution digital files (JPEGs preferred) must be provided upon article acceptance. All copyright permissions must be obtained by the author prior to publication.

 

Questions and submissions should be sent to studiesinthenovel@unt.edu.

The deadline for submissions is September 1, 2016.

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Assistant or Associate Professor of American Studies (USC)

Job Posting Details:  http://jobs.usc.edu:80/postings/71540

Assistant Professor of Early and 19th-Century American Literature (Ball State)

Ball State University’s Department of English is accepting applications for a permanent, full-time, tenure track faculty position as Assistant Professor of Early and 19th-Century American Literature.
Major responsibilities: Teaching and developing undergraduate and graduate courses in the candidate’s area(s) of specialization; teaching a wide range of courses in English as appropriate to the candidate’s expertise; ongoing scholarly publication; service as appropriate. Keep abreast of relevant scholarly developments and incorporate them into teaching; engage in scholarly research, professional development in area(s) of specialization sufficient to attain and maintain Graduate Faculty status.
Minimum qualifications: Completion of PhD in English or related discipline from an accredited college or university by August 1, 2017, with specialization in Early and 19th-Century American Literature, record of effective teaching at the college level, and a record of quality publications and/or presentations in the primary area of specialization. (more…)

Visiting Assistant Professor of Literary Studies (The New School in New York)

Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts at The New School invites applications for a one-year visiting position as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Literary Studies with a start date of Fall 2016. Lang’s Literary Studies curriculum features discussion-based seminars that consider the written word from both critical and creative perspectives. Faculty utilize innovative methods to discover breadth and depth in texts, in writing assignments, and in the field as a whole.

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Visiting Assistant Professor, American Literature (Rollins College)

The Department of English at Rollins College invites applications for a one-year replacement position for a specialist in American Literature beginning Fall 2016. The teaching schedule of    six courses over two semesters will include literature electives in the candidate’s area of specialization, an upper-level class in American literature after 1850, and at least one section of first-year writing. Courses include traditional and non-traditional students. A Ph.D. in American Literature is preferred; ABD may be considered.

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UPDATE: SSAWW 2017 Université Bordeaux Montaigne

We are pleased and honored that both Alice Kaplan and Sarah Rose Etter have accepted our invitation to join us and give a keynote address.

Alice Kaplan is probably best known for her 1993 memoir, French Lessons, which was also a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle award in biography/autobiography. Her latest book, Dreaming in French: The Paris Years of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, Susan Sontag, and Angela Davis, was published in 2012 by the University of Chicago Press and the Editions Gallimard. She has also translated a number of books by Roger Grenier (Piano Music for Four Hands, Another November, and The Difficulty of Being a Dog), Louis Guilloux (OK, Joe), and Evelyne Bloch-Dano (Madame Proust). Last but not least, she is a renowned historian whose first book, Reproductions of Banality (1986), was a theoretical exploration of French fascism. Since then she has published books on Céline’s anti-semitic pamphlets (Sources et citations dans ‘Bagatelles pour un massacre’), on the treason trial of Robert Brasillach (The Collaborator: The Trial and Execution of Robert Brasillach), and on American courts-martial in newly liberated France (The Interpreter).

Sarah Rose Etter is a celebrated young writer whose first collection of stories, Tongue Party, won the 2010 Caketrain Chapbook Competition and has just come out in a French translation by Véronique Béghain (Hommes sous verre, Editions Do). More about Sarah Rose Etter on http://www.caketrain.org/tongueparty/

SSAWW 2017 Université Bordeaux Montaigne CFP: https://ssawwnew.wordpress.com/conferences/ssaww-2017-universite-bordeaux-montaigne/

Post Doctoral Researcher in Special Collections and Digital Humanities (The University of Delaware)

The University of Delaware Library and the College of Arts and Sciences invite applications for a Postdoctoral Fellow of Special Collections and Digital Humanities. We seek an untenured scholar in the humanities (PhD received January 2010 – June 2016). The mission of the Fellow is to promote primary sources related to African American culture found in Special Collections at the University of Delaware Library through collaborative instruction, programming, creative outreach, and project development. The fellowship is a residential one-year academic appointment (September 2016-August 31, 2017), renewable up to three years. The PhD is the only eligible terminal degree. We are looking for an engaged humanist whose educational background suits her or him to work at the intersection of the classroom, the museum and/or archive, and the digital realm. Relevant training in programming, library sciences, computer graphics, computational linguistics, or other fields relevant to digital humanities research is desirable but not required.
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