CFP: Migration, Diaspora, Circulation and Translation: due Feb 15, 2017

Migration, Diaspora, Circulation and Translation

October 5-7, 2017

University College Dublin, Clinton Institute for American Studies

Dublin, Ireland

A conference sponsored by the Charles Brockden Brown Society (www.brockdenbrownsociety.ucf.edu)

Our conference site in Dublin calls to mind issues of migration, immigration, emigration, colonization, revolution, and other changes that result from the movement of people, ideas, and things from one place to another. Such issues were significant in colonial and early national American writing and thought in the long eighteenth century. The current global migration crisis and the recent “Brexit” vote makes these topics timely for reappraisal: as millions of migrants and asylum seekers cross into Europe, the world confronts questions about borders, resources, community, poverty, wealth, understanding of cultural differences, and human rights. The Eleventh Biennial Conference of the Charles Brockden Brown Society invites papers on all aspects of diaspora, migration, circulation, and translation in the long eighteenth century. The following list offers some examples of suggested topics:

  • ●  Texts (letters, periodicals, books, treatises) that migrate from one place to another
  • ●  Migration of species, and theories of natural history that involve migration or hibernation
  • ●  Spread of genetic material in plants or other living beings; ecological biology, biodiversity,

    monoculture or related concepts

  • ●  Movement of food, drink and other cultural practices related to agriculture, food preparation

    and/or eating

  • ●  Loss inherent in places from which migration takes place on a large scale
  • ●  Changing boundaries of nations, places, concepts (gender, childhood, etc.) during the long eighteenth century
  • ●  Colonial and/or imperial repercussions of migration
  • ●  Representations of Irishness as an unstable category in the long eighteenth century
  • ●  Maria Edgeworth’s influence on American texts
  • ●  Literary hoaxes and their reliance on dissemination
  • ●  Ways that “contagion” works differently than “diaspora” as a trope
  • ●  Adaptations, literary influences, allusions, plagiarism, copyright issues
  • ●  Charles Brockden Brown’s depiction of migration, circulation, translation
  • ●  Migratory labor, including prisoners, apprentices, and chattel slaves
  • ●  The effects of borders and border crossing in domestic (national and private) spaces

    Although we are an author society, we solicit proposals from a broad range of texts and practices beyond those associated with Brown and his writings alone. We also encourage interdisciplinary scholarship and work emphasizing non-U.S. literatures. Our conference culture aims to create a space of egalitarian consideration free from career-oriented and competitive attitudes, a place for new work to blossom. In this light, we have no concurrent sessions, so that all may be heard by all. Because of time/space constraints, we may ask you to reframe your proposed talk as a brief (5-10 minute) presentation for inclusion within a roundtable format.

    Travel Support for Graduate Students:

    Two travel awards of $500 each for graduate student participation will be awarded, funded by the Brown Society. Criteria for these travel subventions will favor students at the dissertation stage (over those in earlier stages of degree work) and those who have not previously presented at a CBBS meeting. Graduate students applying for a subvention should indicate their interest in a cover letter and provide information about whether or not they are ABD.

    250-word proposal deadline: February 15, 2017. Please send a proposal in .docx format to hewitt.33@osu.edu.

CFP: Volume on Edith Wharton, due Nov 20, 2016

Call for Papers: Critical Insights, Edith Wharton

Please see below the call for essays for a forthcoming volume on Edith Wharton. The volume is part of the series Critical Insights (Salem Press) and will appear in fall 2017. More information can be found here:

http://www.salempress.com/critical_insights.html

 

Following the guidelines for the series, I seek essays (4000-5000 words) that are accessible to high school students and undergraduates, and are meant to:

  • Provide undergraduates with a comprehensive introduction to the author’s works, as well as the various approaches students are likely to encounter and study in their classrooms.
  • Help students build a foundation for studying works in greater depth by introducing them to key concepts, contexts, critical approaches, and vocabulary in literary scholarship.

The format of each volume is standard, and will include:

  • A “biographical” essay (2000 words) that gives an overview of Wharton’s life
  • A “historical background” essay (4000-5000 words) that addresses how the time period influenced Wharton as well as what makes her work relevant to a modern audience. The essay should consider a variety of contexts in which Wharton’s work is usually placed.
  • A “critical reception” essay (4000-5000 words) that reviews the history of critical responses to Wharton’s oeuvre, and addresses the major concerns that scholars have identified over the years. The essay should be a comprehensive overview of criticism rather than a focused analysis of specific perspectives.
  • A “critical lens” essay (4000-5000 words) that offers a close reading of Wharton’s work(s) from a particular critical standpoint (e.g. gender studies, cultural studies, disability studies, etc).
  • A “comparative analysis” essay (4000-5000 words) that analyzes Wharton in the light of another (similar or contemporary) author.

 

In addition: the volume will include ten 5000-word essays, which will offer various critical readings of Wharton’s work. Topics could address (but are not limited to):

  • Wharton and the First World War; Wharton and race; Wharton and feminism; queer readings of Wharton’s works; Wharton and cosmopolitanism; Wharton and modernism; Wharton as an architectural historian; Wharton’s works in comparison with other writers (American or not); Wharton in a transatlantic context; Wharton and animal studies; Wharton and disability; Wharton and other genres (e.g. Gothic); Wharton in film; Wharton as a travel writer, etc.
  • I welcome topics that reflect the main critical approaches to Wharton’s oeuvre, as well as recent reevaluations of her work. Essays that incorporate a range of Wharton’s texts are strongly encouraged. Readings and approaches should not be dated nor so cutting-edge as to be dated in the next 10 years.

 

Please send an abstract (500-1000 words) and a brief CV by November 20, 2016 to:

 

Myrto Drizou, PhD

Department of English

Valdosta State University

Valdosta GA 31698

mdrizou@valdosta.edu

 

Notification of acceptance by December 15, 2016. Complete first drafts (5000 words) due by March 15, 2017.

CFP: James Fenimore Cooper and American Women Writers, Due Jan 15, 2017

The James Fenimore Cooper Society will host the following panel at the 28th annual American Literature Association conference, which will take place from May 25-28, 2017, in Boston, MA.

Panel 1: James Fenimore Cooper and American Women Writers

Contributing to a literary marketplace largely shaped by Cooper’s success as a professional writer, American women writers from the 19th century to the present have been strongly influenced by or have consciously responded to Cooper’s novels, themes, and generic innovations. This panel will consider the ways women writers – from Cooper’s contemporaries, such as Catharine Maria Sedgwick (Hope Leslie) to current writers, such as Lauren Groff (The Ghosts of Templeton) –have been shaped by Cooper, his novels, and/or his literary contributions. Papers may consider the ways Cooper was influenced by female contemporaries as well. Please submit to a 250-word abstract, a brief cv (2-3 pages), and an indication of whether or not the paper may be published in the James Fenimore Cooper Society Journal by January 15, 2017. Please also indicate any audio-visual requirements. All proposals should be both pasted into the text of the email and included as attachments (word files or pdfs preferred).

Please submit abstracts and accompanying materials to Luis A. Iglesias (luis.iglesias@usm.edu) by January 15, 2017.

Papers should be a maximum of 20 minutes (6-8 pages) in length. Brief discussion will follow the presentations. Presenters need not be members of the James Fenimore Cooper Society, though we certainly hope they will choose to join. Please note that as per ALA guidelines, no one may present more than one paper at the conference.

Papers presented at the conference will, with their authors’ permission, be published in the James Fenimore Cooper Society Journal and made available online at the Cooper Society website. Papers may be mildly revised for publication.

 

CFP: “Transcendentalist Intersections” (due August 1, 2017)

“Transcendentalist Intersections: Literature, Philosophy, Religion”

University of Heidelberg, Germany, July 26 – 29, 2018

 

Sponsored by the Ralph Waldo Emerson Society, the Margaret Fuller Society, and the Anglistisches Seminar and Center for American Studies at the University of Heidelberg

 

At its first meeting in 1836, the Transcendental Club declared an “organ of spiritual philosophy” to be essential to the project, and, when The Dial came forth in 1840 under Margaret Fuller’s editorship, its subtitle—“Literature, Philosophy, and Religion”—was meant to convey both the breadth and depth of the movement’s aims.  As Emerson introduced it, the ambitious new journal would “share [in such] impulses of the time” as “special reforms to the state,” “modifications of the various callings of men,” “opening a new scope for literature and art,” “philosophical insight,” and “the vast solitudes of prayer.” 

 

In the spirit of The Dial, and with its subtitle too, the organizers of “Transcendentalist Intersections” invite paper proposals seeking to do justice to that breadth and depth of the movement, generously construed. For this multi-disciplinary, international conference dedicated to new scholarship on American Transcendentalism, we are particularly interested in proposals engaging literature, philosophy, and religion, and especially encourage not only literary scholars but historians, philosophers, theologians, and others to share their ideas. 

 

·       With regard to literature, we welcome papers examining texts and authors traditionally ignored or cast as “minor”; such forms as journalism, literature of reform or revolt, correspondence, travel writing, history, philosophy as literature; relations between literature and visual or musical arts; biographical approaches; transnational dialogues; reception history, the history of the book and the relevance of literary institutions; and revisionist approaches to or paradigms of Transcendentalism.  We encourage papers that address the convergences and tensions between literature and philosophical issues on the one hand and/or issues of religion, spirituality, or the sacred on the other.   

 

·       With regard to religion, we especially invite papers discussing the entanglements of Transcendentalists (major or minor) with other 19th-century American religious movements such as the Second Great Awakening, the Holiness and Spiritualist revivals, Catholic immigration, and the emergence of groups centered around new “American Scriptures” such as Mormonism. We are interested in the engagement of Transcendentalists with various Christian theological debates and scholarly discourses of the time, such as the higher criticism, the “New Christianity” of the Saint-Simonians, the Christian socialism of the Abbé Lammenais, the pantheism of Pierre Leroux, and the comparative study of religion. We also encourage papers investigating the contribution of Transcendentalists to the construction of religion as a category or of particular religious traditions (e.g. “Hinduism” or “Buddhism”); as well as Transcendentalism’s role in the coming of the modern paradigm of “seeker spirituality.”

 

·       With regard to philosophy, we encourage proposals in all of the subfields that have been so vigorously engaged by Transcendentalist scholars in recent years.  This would especially include work on the Transcendentalists in relation to social and political philosophy (e.g., feminism, antislavery, liberalism, democracy, socialism, environmentalism, human rights); religious philosophy (e.g., secularism and post-secularism); ethics (e.g., Kantian and post-Kantian, pragmatist ethics, virtue ethics); metaphysics (e.g., “neo-Platonism, Romantic theories of being and selfhood, Nietzcheanism, post-metaphysics”); epistemology (e.g., agnosticism, fallibilism, anti-foundationalism, skepticism); and aesthetics (symbolism, theories of metaphor and poetic expression, art and social reform, translation, and (again) music and the visual arts).

 

Please direct abstracts (300-500 words) and two-page CVs by August 1, 2017 to any of the members of the conference planning subcommittee: Charlene Avallone avallone000@gmail.com, Dan Malachuk ds-malachuk@wiu.edu, or Jan Stievermann jstievermann@hca.uni-heidelberg.de.  

 

A conference webpage and announcement of keynote speakers are forthcoming.  This cfp is posted in the meantime at https://emersonsociety.org/2016/09/22/heidelberg-cfp/ and http://www.fullersociety.org/ For more information about our hosts, see http://www.hca.uni-heidelberg.de/index_en.html and http://www.as.uni-heidelberg.de/

Job Position due Nov 15: The Herman Melville Distinguished Professorship in American Literature – University of Kansas

The Herman Melville Distinguished Professorship in American Literature

 

The University of Kansas English Department invites candidates to apply for a newly endowed Herman Melville Distinguished Professorship in American Literature. For this tenured faculty position at the Distinguished Professor level, we seek a prominent senior scholar whose work critically re-engages the writings of one or more of the following writers—Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman—as well as other writings and writers from the mid-nineteenth century U.S. We have a particular interest in scholars engaged by critical race theory, feminism, and/or ecocriticism but welcome a variety of possible methodological approaches.

 

Required Qualifications:

Evaluation of the following requirements will be made through (1) descriptions of research and teaching in letter of application, (2) record of accomplishments and productivity included in c.v., and (3) information provided from three professional references.

 

  • Ph.D. in English or a related field.
  • A demonstrated commitment to the study of mid-nineteenth century U.S. literature, including works by some or all of the authors named above.
  • A record of excellence in teaching at the college or university level.
  • A significant distinguished record of research and scholarly publication in refereed national or international publications, such as journal articles, books, and scholarly digital projects.
  • Eligibility for appointment with tenure at the Distinguished Professor level: Candidates should have a distinguished international reputation for research and publication in their area of specialization. They should be significantly engaged in other professional activities and provide evidence of outstanding teaching abilities. It is expected that candidates should be tenured full professors or have equivalent credentials.

 

For a complete announcement and to apply online, go to https://employment.ku.edu/academic/7088BR. A complete online application includes the following materials: cover letter; curriculum vitae; and the names, e-mail, and contact information for three professional references. Initial review of applications will begin November 15, 2016.

 

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, retaliation, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies and is the University’s Title IX Coordinator: the Executive Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785)864-6414, 711 TTY.

CFP: Rust and Recovery, ALSE 2017

Rust/Resistance: Works of Recovery

Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (ASLE)

Twelfth Biennial Conference, June 20 – 24, 2017

Wayne State University

Detroit, Michigan

http://asle2017.clas.wayne.edu

 

 

In Rust: The Longest War, Jonathan Waldman claims that, for those who “yield to rust, find beauty in rust, capitalize on rust, raise awareness of rust, and teach about rust, work is riddled with scams, lawsuits, turf battles, and unwelcome oversight. Explosions, collisions, arrests, threats, and insults abound.”  Rust is the underside of cosmopolis. Rust belts follow industry and its corrosions; the parasitic Rust fungi are enemies of agriculture. And yet there is an irenic side to rust: it inspires contemplation, the search for beauty, and the effort to defend what is threatened. As an agent of time, rust sponsors stories of collapse-and-recovery, evolution-and-extinction, but it also questions them. Narratives of progress that see rust as the enemy are not universal. In Japanese aesthetics, for instance, sabi is the beauty of natural aging and aged materials; what is new is not as lovely as what has weathered. In a time obsessed by environmental apocalypse, rust may reveal other trajectories for cultures of recovery. Resurget Cineribus, “It Will Rise from the Ashes,” is the motto of Detroit—our host city.

 

Long associated with steel, car culture, and the music of Motown, Detroit is also a site of struggle for racial and environmental justice, against depopulation and “ruin porn,” and for the preservation of artistic heritage. A nexus of encounters between indigenous nations and the French fur trade, it became a locus of the Great Migration, “white flight,” and gentrification. Water-rich on the strait between Lake Huron and Lake Erie, Detroit and its neighbors struggle against corroded infrastructure and government corruption. For all those reasons, Detroit is an ideal place to confer about rust, resistance, and recovery. We invite participants to interpret the conference theme as broadly as possible and to imagine their work in terms of content and  form. We particularly encourage non-traditional modes of presentation, including hybrid, performative and collaborative works; panels that minimize formal presentation in favor of engaged emergent discussion; interdisciplinary approaches; environmentally inflected readings of fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, film, theatre and other media; and proposals from outside the academic humanities, including submissions from artists, writers, teachers, practitioners, activists and colleagues in the social and natural sciences. Topics may include, but are certainly not limited to:

The literatures, arts, and cultures of the Rust Belt, the Great Lakes, and Appalachia. Bioregionalism, eco-cosmopolitanism, multinaturalism, (New) historicism, material ecocriticism, posthumanism, queer ecology, postcolonial ecocriticism, new media theory, decolonization theory, geography, and geocriticism as techniques for the analysis of rust-culture.

Transnational rust: Detroit and its relationship with Ontario; the borderlands of Canada and the United States; nationalist and cosmopolitan rusts; colonial, postcolonial, and decolonial rusts.

Elemental rust: Rust as an element of nature writing, natural history, agrarian and wilderness literature. The nature of iron and the arts of steel; water as an agent of rust;  rust as vitality, materiality, and quintessence; corrosion as hyper-object; mines, foundries, and factories; nuclear rust; rust and oil, coal, and natural gas;  Rust as programming language; rust as the essence of the Internet; the Internet of (Rusty) Things; steampunk aesthetics; rust as waste of civilization.

Labor and rust: Corrosions of justice; the literature and other arts of labor; agricultures of resistance; class as a category of environmental analysis; working class nature writing; environmental infrastructures; precarity and the corrosion of higher education; petrocultures of labor; the work of environmentalism; the energy humanities; environmental catastrophes and the working class; blue collar conservation and restoration; environmentalism and the Old Left; folk, rock, soul, funk, and other forms of music as resistance..

Aeons of rust: Iron ages: archaic, classical, late antique, medieval, early modern, Renaissance, Victorian, Modernist, and postmodern rust; the aesthetics and poetics of weathering, rhetorics of collapse and recovery; periodization after the “Anthropocene;” narratives of extinction; legends of rust; rust as telos; rust as closure;  cosmologies, cosmogonies, and eschatologies of rust.

The arts and sciences of resistance: Public health and environmental justice; methods derived from climatology, paleontology, geology; changes in the weather reporting; post/industrial ecologies; urban ecology; urban nature/parks/green spaces, urban planning; planned resilience; cities and climate change; ecotopias, urban renaissance, new urbanisms; green architecture.

Methods of resistance: Recovering conservation, ecofeminism, Deep Ecology, intersectionality, critical race theory, comparatism, formalism, anthropology, folkloristics, social ecology, deconstruction, eco-Marxism, Green anarchism, Writing Studies, rhetoric and composition, and other “rusty” methods for the environmental humanities.

Genres of resistance: Natural histories of resistance; the poetry of witness; testimony, autoethnography, virality as modes of activism; slam and avant-garde ecopoetry; folklore; the visual arts of resistance; post/industrial photography; survivance as a resistant mode; “cli-fi”; sentimental literature as resistance; Naturalism; the proletarian novel; prison literature; resistant memoir; investigative theater; viral video; the politics of video games; the museum as target or agent of resistance; video installations.

Recovering ecological citizenship: Rhetorics of citizenship; the public sphere in the age of climate change; globalization and the “global citizen”; social media as an activist tool;  traditions of direct action; democratic environments; green populism; civic environmentalism; activist pedagogies.

Recovering lost lands: Narratives of drowned cities and lost homelands (Atlantis, Tuvalu, Aztlan, Doggerland, Oz); the literature of hurricanes and floods; Katrina, Sandy, and the media; water rights; state seizures of local resources and governance; the environment of ethnic neighborhoods; refuges and refugia; sanctuaries; ecological sovereignty;  ecological reparations; eco-cultural nationalisms: First Nations activism, gay and lesbian lands/queer territories, postcolonial recoveries; cosmopolitan alliances.

Recovering past and future: Ends of environmental history; paradises born in hell; the place of the Roman and other empires in declensionist narratives; linguistic recoveries; neo-medievalisms; fantasy fiction as imagined past; science fiction as extrapolation; queer futurities; archaeology and anthropology in the environmental humanities; the corrosion and recovery of literary history.

  Panel and Paper Submission:

For additional information and to submit a pre-formed panel or individual presentation, please visit the conference website at http://asle2017.clas.wayne.edu

All proposals must be submitted by December 12, 2016. We will evaluate your proposal carefully and notify you of its final status by February 15, 2017.

 

 

CFP: Gender Studies in the Library

Gender Studies in the Library: Case Studies, Programming, Outreach

Book Publisher: McFarland

Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Library’s Role in Supporting Financial Literacy for Patrons (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016); public library administrator, special, school librarian.

Lura Sanborn, co-editor. Women, Work, and the Web, contributor, (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015); public, academic, school librarian.

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty, sharing practical know-how about what works for Women/ Men/LGBTIQ to meet patron gender information. Chapters sought useful to public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty: proven, creative, case studies, how-to chapters based on experience to help colleagues with innovative workshops, outreach, grants, resources.

Topics could include but are not limited to: getting boys to use the library; showcasing GBLTIQ voices; programming, successful examples, intentions and outcomes; acquisitions, to support, showcase, represent; wage gaps; women’s studies librarianship. No previously published, simultaneously submitted material. One, two, or three authors per chapter; each chapter by the same author(s). Compensation: one complimentary copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many co-authors or if one or two chapters: author discount on more.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapters each described in a few sentences by September 20, 2016, brief bio on each author; place GEN, Your Name on subject line: smallwood.carol@gmail.com