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CFP: Adrienne Rich (Journal issue; Deadline 4.30.15)

Women’s Studies Journal CFP

American poet Adrienne Rich died on March 27, 2012. The response, nationally and internationally, to this loss was immediate and speaks to her place and import in American literature and culture. As Katha Pollit wrote, “The death of Adrienne Rich marks not only the end of a long and transcendent literary career—thirty books of poetry and prose, prizes beyond counting—but the end of a kind of poetry that mattered in the world beyond poetry.” The Poetry Foundation claims Rich as “one of America’s foremost public intellectuals,” while the New York Times wrote that Rich was “a poet of towering reputation and towering rage, whose work — distinguished by an unswerving progressive vision and a dazzling, empathic ferocity — brought the oppression of women and lesbians to the forefront of poetic discourse and kept it there for nearly a half-century.”

For over 60 years, Adrienne Rich has mapped who we are and what we believe in five essay collections, sixteen poetry collections, and three editions of collected poems. Her volumes of writings address a diverse range of issues including, gender, class, sexuality, nationalism, poverty, violence, racism, and our individual and collective responsibilities to our local, national, and international communities. In doing so, she emerged as not just one of the foremost women writers in the United States, but also one of our foremost poets. She is often cited as one of our most important poets of the post-World War II era, a significant feminist theorist of the 20th century, a groundbreaking poet who has shaped our understandings of political and social movements, particularly the women’s movement, since the 1960s, and a powerful essayist who has consistently examined the intersections of poetry and politics.

Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal plans a special issue devoted to the writings of Adrienne Rich and her legacy. Possible articles could:

  • Reflect upon the arc of Rich’s career and its import for American letters
  • Situate and assess the impact of Rich’s writings in feminist movement
  • Focus on her later works since the 1986 publication of Your Native Land, Your Life
  • Situate Rich’s work in an international context
  • Examine Rich’s role as a “public intellectual”
  • Return to earlier works such as “Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence” to consider their impact
  • Examine Rich’s experiments with poetic form
  • Explore Rich’s influence on and intellectual relationships with specific poets, activists, and/or theorists who were her contemporaries
  • Trace Rich’s influence on current-day poets, activists, and/or theorists
  • Contemplate teaching Rich in the 21st century

Abstract proposals should be between 300-500 words in length. Writers whose abstracts are accepted will then be invited to submit full manuscripts for consideration.

Project deadlines:

Proposals: April 30, 2015

Decision notifications: June 1, 2015

Articles (20-30 pp.) due: September 1, 2015

Please send abstract and a short CV (1-2 pages) including institutional affiliation and publications to: jenriley175@gmail.com

Proposals: April 30, 2015

Decision notifications: June 1, 2015

Articles (20-30 pp.) due: September 1, 2015

Please send abstract and a short CV (1-2 pages) including institutional affiliation and publications to: jenriley175@gmail.com

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