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Monthly Archives: July 2014

CFP: Saving the World: Girlhood and Evangelicalism in the 19th Century (Proposal Deadline: 9.1.14)

CFP: Saving the World: Girlhood and Evangelicalism in the 19th Century
Deadline for Proposals: Sept 1, 2014 

We are looking for essays to round out our collection. In particular, we are interested in essays that engage:

·      animal studies

·      issues of race, especially children’s abolitionist literature

·      formal female education (e.g. Sunday schools, common schools, seminaries, finishing schools etc.)

 This collection explores how texts that are written for girls, or represent girls, participate in the work of reform through an evangelical agenda.   This collection seeks to contribute to the burgeoning field of childhood studies in U.S. nineteenth-century literature and culture, which has been exploring the contours of emerging conceptions of childhood in the nineteenth-century, complicating the boundaries between adult and child, and asking what happens when we foreground the child. We are especially interested in essays that explore the cultural work this evangelical literature performs, through its representations of, for example, childhood, kinship structures, discipline, authority, disability, education, race, and class. While our focus is on the U.S., we are also interested in work by British and Canadian writers.

We are seeking essays of 6,000-7,000 words. Please submit proposals of 500 words and a brief CV to Robin Cadwallader (RCadwallader@francis.edu) and Allison Giffen (Allison.giffen@wwu.edu) no later than Sept 1, 2014.  We are planning a quick turn-around with this collection and the deadlines will be tight once essays are selected. We will notify you of acceptance and timeframe shortly after the deadline for submissions.

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CFP:Reconceptualizing the Turn into the Twentieth Century: Critical Essays on American Literary History (Essay Collection; Abstract deadline 9.15.14)

Call for Papers

Reconceptualizing the Turn into the Twentieth Century: Critical Essays on American Literary History

Despite the substantial reconceptualization of the field of American literature in recent decades, century-based constructs typically remain in place throughout the field, particularly in relation to “nineteenth-century American literature” versus “twentieth-century American literature.” Courses are taught, textbooks sold, and academic jobs are constructed around such distinctions. Such logic particularly limits scholarship on the turn into the twentieth century, often characterized as a midpoint on a teleological trajectory culminating in literary modernism.  This collection of essays aims to complicate and challenge the conceptual divide between the 19th and 20th centuries by exploring turn-of-the-century works (“T-20” works) in light of the particular negotiations engaged in by writers from the 1880-1920 era, or those that render writing from this period irreducible to a clear periodization by century.  We are especially interested in essays that rethink boundaries denoted by century and in those that create models for extending both “19th c thought” and “modernity” so as to interrogate the meeting of a long, late 19th century and an extended, emergent modernity.

Proposals for 25-page  essays might consider the following:

*What constructs, authors, and texts are particularly useful in exploring the unique historical and ideological assumptions about literature from the century’s turn? (more…)

CFP: Studies in the Novel (Journal; Ongoing call)

Studies in the Novel, an international scholarly journal in its 46th year, is actively seeking article submissions focused on nineteenth-century American novels for its quarterly issues. All submissions should be sent through our online system (http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/sitn). Please send any questions or editorial correspondence to Tim Boswell, Managing Editor, at studiesinthenovel@unt.edu.

Updated Job Posting: African American Literature at Bard College (Deadline 11.15.14)

Bard College

African American Literature, tenure-track, fall 2015

The Division of Languages & Literature invites applications for a full-time, tenure-line appointment in African-American literature, rank open. We are looking for an exceptional scholar and teacher whose writing and research interests are focused on African-American literature and whose work potentially intersects with American and Atlantic history, American studies, and Africana studies. He or she should be able to teach American studies courses and to participate in the three-course American literature sequence. This faculty member will teach also in Bard’s First-Year Seminar, the foundation of the college’s commitment to general liberal arts education.

The successful candidate must hold or be near completion of a Ph.D. Please send a letter of application, a curriculum vitae, a 20-page writing sample and three letters of recommendation by electronic submission through Interfolio by Committee:http://apply.interfolio.com/25344 by November 15, 2014. Bard College is an equal opportunity employer and we welcome applications from those who contribute to our diversity.

CFP: Edith Wharton Review (deadline: on-going)

CFP: Edith Wharton Review (deadline: on-going).

The Edith Wharton Review, a peer-reviewed, MLA-indexed journal is currently seeking submissions. The journal is committed to rigorous study not only of Edith Wharton, but on Wharton in the context of other authors, and on Wharton in relation to late-nineteenth and early twentieth-century culture more generally. It publishes traditional criticism, pedagogical scholarship, essays on archival materials, review essays, and book reviews. The Review aims to foster emerging scholars and new approaches to Wharton studies as well as established scholarly approaches.

On the occasion of its 30th anniversary, the journal now boasts a new design and vastly expanded content. Recent special issues include “_The Custom of the Country at 100” and “Teaching Edith Wharton’s Late Fiction.” Opportunities exist to publish on Wharton’s lesser-known works, as well as her more canonical writings.

If you are interested in submitting, please contact Meredith Goldsmith, Editor (mgoldsmith@ursinus.edu). Submissions should be 20-25 pages, and prepared according to the _MLA Style Manual_.

Enquiries welcome.

CFP: Indigenous Children’s Literature (Journal issue; Deadline 7.1.15)

Call for Papers:

Bookbird: A Journal of International Children’s Literature invites contributions for a special issue exploring Indigenous Children’s Literature from around the world. Taking our cue from studies like Clare Bradford’s germinal Unsettling Narratives, which examines First Nations’ issues in texts by Indigenous and non-Indigenous authors, this issue welcomes articles that focus on texts for children and young adults by Indigenous/Native/Aboriginal/First Nations authors. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

-nations within and across nations

-decolonization and survivance

-orality and storytelling

-history and context (more…)

Job Posting: African American Literature at Bard College (Deadline: 9.30.14)

From Chronicle Vitae

The Division of Languages & Literature at Bard College invites applications for a full-time, tenure-line appointment in African-American literature, rank open (candidates at the assistant, associate, and full professor levels are encouraged to apply).

We are looking for an exceptional scholar and teacher whose writing and research interests are focused on African-American literature and whose work potentially intersects with American and Atlantic History, American Studies, and Africana Studies. He or she should be able to teach American Studies courses and to participate in the three-course American literature sequence.  This faculty member will teach also in Bard’s First-Year Seminar, the foundation of the colleges commitment to general liberal arts education. – See more at: https://chroniclevitae.com/jobs/0000838882-01#sthash.8cq0wEfE.7CGPgUyK.dpuf