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SSAWW 2015 Conference Submission Guidelines

SSAWW 2015 Conference (Philadelphia, PA, November 4-8, 2015)
Submission Guidelines

Due date for all proposals: Friday, February 13, 2015

Abstract length: 250-300 words

Submission is electronic.

Please submit individual proposals and completed panel proposals to ssaww2015.submit@gmail.com,

both attached in Word or rtf, and pasted into the body of the message.

The conference organizers welcome and encourage complete session submissions as well as individual paper abstract submissions. Affiliate associations and regional groups should follow the submission guidelines for complete session submissions.

Please Note: if not already a member of SSAWW, presenters must become SSAWW members once the paper is accepted.
Every attempt will be made to notify submitters of the status of their proposals by late May 2015 and to have the draft program in place by late June 2015.

Conference participants may appear on the program twice as presenters: once on a panel presenting a formal academic paper, and once in an additional way: for example, on a roundtable, as a respondent, or in a “professionalization” session.

Complete Panel Submission Guidelines:

The cfp for complete panel submissions can be posted on the SSAWW website in addition to other venues of your choice. For posting on the SSAWW website, please send cfp to: ssaww2015.web@gmail.com.

The panel call for papers site is: https://ssawwnew.wordpress.com/2015-conference/calls-for-papers-for-prospective-ssaww-2015-panels/ .

Session lengths are 1 hour and 15 minutes.

Complete sessions may take the form of panels or roundtables. A panel normally consists of three, preferably four presenters, who speak for approximately 15 minutes each with 15 minutes left for discussion. Roundtables consist of five or more participants who speak briefly (6-8 minutes), and emphasize discussion among themselves and with the audience.

The organizers welcome variations on and innovations in format within the allotted time frames. If you are proposing a different format for a complete session, please explain the format clearly, and state the rationale and benefits.

If submitting a complete session, please ensure that notifications go out by the end of January at the latest to those whose proposals are declined for the particular panel so that they can still submit individual paper abstracts by the conference submission deadline of February 13.

Email Header: Please put 1) “Complete Session” in the subject line, followed by a brief title (one to five words); 2) OR the name of the affiliate association; 3) OR the name of the regional group

Please include the following information for complete session proposals in the body of the email, as well as attached in Word or rtf.

Adapting the guidelines set out by the American Literature Association which facilitates the copying of accepted submissions directly into the program, we ask that you provide a summary of the panel information at the beginning of the submission in the following format, listing the session title, the chair and affiliation (if any), the organizer (if different from the chair), and affiliate association / group name (if any), and each of the presenters, citing name, affiliation (if any), and title of paper in quotation marks. Please turn off auto format to prevent automatic indenting. Commas separate the name, affiliation, and title, and there is no period at the end. Here is an example:

Gender and Print Culture
Chair: Mary Smith, Nu University
Organized by the North American Society of Women Scholars of Print Culture

Jane Eyre, Thornfield College, “The Afterlife of Women’s Words”
Will Ladislaw, Middlemarch University, “Writing the Right Moment”
Hester Prynne, Independent Scholar, “Embodied Print”
Jo March, Concord State College, “Writing for Money, Writing for the Self”

In addition, please provide the following information:
– Contact person’s name and contact information: email and phone (to be used only if email fails)
– Title of session:
– Type of session: please indicate if this is a panel or roundtable, or please explain if you are proposing an alternate format
– Chair: name and affiliation (if any)
– Brief biography (60 word limit)
– Organizer’s name and affiliation (if any), and brief biography (60 word limit) if different from the Chair; or if the session is being organized by an affiliate association or regional group, please provide its name here
– Abstract overview of session submission (250 – 300 words)
– *A/V requirements: please indicate none or yes (please note that we recognize the need for audio visual support for some presentations, but ask that you consider its necessity carefully because of the high costs involved); if yes, please specify the equipment required.

For each presenter:
– Name and affiliation (if any)
– Title of paper
– Abstract (250 – 300 words)
– Brief biography (60 word limit)
– Email contact

Submit to: ssaww2015.submit@gmail.com by Friday, February 13, 2015

Individual Paper Abstract Submission Guidelines

Email Header: Please put “Individual Submission” in the subject line, followed by a brief title of the paper (one to five words)

In the body of the email, as well as attached in Word or rtf, please include the following:

To facilitate the copying of accepted submissions directly into the program, please provide the submission in the following format at the beginning of the submission:

Name, affiliation (if any), title of paper in quotation marks; the items are separated by commas and there is no period at the end.

Example:

Mary Smith, Nu University, “Empowered by Literature”

Then, please provide the following:

– Name and affiliation (if any)
– Email and phone contact (phone will only be used in the event of email failure)
– Title of paper:
– Abstract (250 – 300 words)
– *A/V requirements: please indicate none or yes (please note that we recognize the need for audio visual support for some presentations, but ask that you consider its necessity carefully because of the high costs involved); if yes, please specify the equipment required.
– Brief biography (60 word limit)

Submit to: ssaww2015.submit@gmail.com by Friday, February 13, 2015

Thank you.

CFP: SSAWW 2015 Triennial Conference (Deadline: 2.13.15)

SSAWW Triennial Conference November 4-8, 2015
Sheraton Society Hill, Philadelphia, PA
Call for Proposals

Due Date: Friday, February 13, 2015 for all proposals.

 Please submit individual proposals and completed panel proposals to ssaww2015.submit@gmail.com

, both attached in Word or rtf, and pasted into the body of the message.
Please see the complete submission guidelines posted on the website.

For the 2015 Triennial Conference of the Society for the Study of American Women Writers, the conference organizers welcome proposals on any topic related to the study of American women writers, broadly conceived. The strength of the society is rooted in the dynamic ideas and research accomplishments of its members, which the 2015 conference continues to facilitate and honor. As in the past, however, we would also like to take the opportunity that the conference affords to create discussions and conversations around a shared theme, which we have designated as

Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives.

The terms liminality and hybridity are most familiar in post-colonial contexts; however, they suggest critical concepts that draw on multiple disciplines and privilege inclusion. Often informed by notions of crossing, intersectionality, transition, and transformation, these terms contest exclusionary practices involving class, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, and sex, among other variables. The word “limen,” from which liminality derives, designates threshold. The threshold functions simultaneously as both an obstructive barrier and an enticing opening for the entry into unknown, perhaps unknowable states that invite exploration. Both spatial and temporal, the liminal is a site of in-betweenness enabling non-normative perspectives. It is a site where difference becomes encounter as well as a location that resists assimilation while simultaneously allowing for the dynamic possibilities of fusion that hybridity embraces and articulates.

With the theme of “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” the 2015 Triennial SSAWW Conference aims to celebrate the multiplicity of American women’s writing across a longstanding literary tradition that continues to be dynamic in contemporary times. The conference theme of liminality and hybridity, and the wide range of implications and meanings that these expansive concepts imply, will facilitate a process of encounters, engagements, and conversations within, between, among, and across the rich polyphony that constitutes the creative acts of American women. Thus, through a focus on liminality and hybridity, the 2015 SSAWW conference hopes to present the varied ways in which women, as critics, dramatists, educators, essayists, journalists, oral storytellers, poets, novelists, short story writers, and practitioners of both older and emerging forms, invent and reinvent the American literary and cultural landscape.

Possible topics involving the conference themes may include but are not limited to such keywords and ideas as:

  • Alienation and/or disillusionment as states of in-betweenness
  • Borders and peripheries
  • Boundaries between/within the built environment and/or the natural environment
  • Child, adult and blurring boundaries
  • Collaboration
  • Crossings
  • Cross-species encounters: human and animal relationships
  • Horizontal and/or vertical paradigms of social constructs
  • The hyphen
  • In between public and private or the semi-private, the semi-public
  • In between resilience and vulnerability
  • Historical constructions of space, place, home
  • Liminal spaces in the home
  • Immigration and/or citizenship
  • Inside and outside—the academy, the canon, etc.
  • Leadership from, on, within the margins
  • The mainstream and/or the subversive
  • The margin and/or the center
  • Mutations
  • Obscurity and celebrity
  • Outliers
  • Porosity
  • Pressures of normalization
  • Technology and the human
  • Transatlantic
  • Transcontinental
  • Transgender
  • Transgressions

The conference organizers welcome and encourage complete session submissions as well as individual paper abstract submissions. The cfp for complete panel submissions can be posted on the SSAWW website in addition to other venues of your choice. For posting on the SSAWW website, please send cfp to: ssaww2015.web@gmail.com.

Please direct questions about the conference to: ssaww2015.query@gmail.com
Submissions are electronic: ssaww2015.submit@gmail.com

We look to the 2015 conference to carry forward past achievements, and to create present and future opportunities for the growth of the Society and all its members with the understanding that inclusivity, in all its forms, intellectual rigor, and supportive outlooks are the responsibility of the entire membership. We look forward to hearing from you and receiving your submissions.

Conference Organizers:
Rita Bode (rbode@trentu.ca), VP of Organizational Matters and Conference Director
Dick Ellis (r.j.ellis@birmingham.ac.uk), President
Beth L. Lueck (lueckb@uww.edu), Associate Conference Director
Miranda Green-Barteet (mgreenb6@uwo.ca), Conference Program Coordinator
Leslie Allison (leslie.allison@temple.edu), Conference Grad Assistant
Rickie-Ann Legleitner

Rickie.Legleitner@BHSU.edu 

, Conference Grad Assistant

Grants, Prizes, and Fellowships: Emily Dickinson International Society Scholar in Amherst Award, 2015 (Deadline: 1.15.15)

Emily Dickinson International Society Scholar in Amherst Award, 2015

EDIS invites applications for the 2015 Scholar in Amherst Program that supports exciting new research on Dickinson. The award of $2,000 may be used for expenses related to that research such as travel, accommodations, a rental car, or reproduction fees. Upon completion of their research, recipients will write a letter to the EDIS Board outlining what they achieved with EDIS support, and we appreciate acknowledgment in any resulting publications. We encourage recipients to consider a visit to Amherst, but residency is not a requirement. Preference will be given to persons with completed PhDs who are in the early stages of their careers. To apply for the 2014 Scholar in Amherst Award, please submit a cv, a letter of introduction (written by the applicant), a two-page project proposal including preliminary budget and brief bibliography, by January 15, 2015 to Paul Crumbley at paul.crumbley@usu.edu. Letters of recommendation are not accepted as part of the application packet. Applications will be acknowledged upon receipt and applicants notified of final decisions by March 1. For more information, see www.emilydickinsoninternationalsociety.org

 

Emily Dickinson International Society Graduate Student Fellowship, 2015

EDIS announces a fellowship award of $1,000 in support of graduate student scholarship on Emily Dickinson. The award may be used to fund travel to collections or conferences, to support book purchases, or for other research expenses (such as reproduction costs) necessary to the project. Preference will be given to applicants enrolled in doctoral programs and engaged in the writing of dissertations or other major projects directed toward publication. Applicants should be aware that a dissertation project need not be focused solely on Dickinson; however, a substantial part of the work should significantly engage Dickinson’s life, work, reputation, and influence. To apply, please send a cv, a project description, the names and contact information of two references, and a dissertation prospectus or other relevant writing sample of no more than 25 pages to Paul Crumbley at paul.crumbley@usu.edu. Applications are due by January 15, 2015. Letters of recommendation are not accepted as part of the application packet. Applications will be acknowledged upon receipt and applicants notified of final decisions by March 1. For more information, see http://www.emilydickinsoninternationalsociety.org

CFP: Jack London and Women (Deadline: 7.10.14)

CFP: Jack London and Women
Jack London Society Symposium
Berkeley, California
October 29-November 2, 2014

http://jacklondonsociety.org/

With a reputation resting on adventure tales such as The Call of the Wild and The Sea-Wolf,  Jack London is not the first author who comes to mind when thinking of American women writers. Yet London wrote courageous female characters into many of his short stories and novels, acknowledged his debt to such female mentors as Ina Coolbrith, gave advice to young writers, and corresponded with a number of his contemporaries, among them Mary Austin, Blanche Partington, Anna Strunsky, and Olga Nethersole.

This panel addresses London’s biographical or literary connections, including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Revolutionaries and “super-women”
  • Biographical connections between London and women writers
  • Women in the Socialist movement
  • London’s responses to the work of women writers and vice versa
  • Racial lives and female power
  • Sexuality and gender identity
  • Evolutionary narratives and Darwinian sexual choice in London’s speculative fiction (Before Adam, “The Scarlet Plague,” “The Red One”)

Please send proposals of 200-300 words to Donna Campbell, campbelld@wsu.edu, by 10 July 2014. 

CFP: The Domestic and the National in Woolson and Her Contemporaries (Deadline: 8.15.14)

The Domestic and the National in Woolson and Her Contemporaries
Eleventh Biennial Conference of the Constance Fenimore Woolson Society

 Washington, D.C.
Feb. 19-21, 2014

Keynote Speaker: Allison Booth

In honor of this year’s conference venue, the nation’s capital, the Constance Fenimore Woolson Society invites proposals on any aspect of  the domestic or national in Woolson’s works or in the works of her contemporaries. We encourage work that examines tensions between home and abroad, the margin and the center, the capital and the nation, the regional and the federal.

Possible topics include:

  • Domestic spaces as sites of nation-building
  • Constructions of the “foreign”
  • Contending Nationalities
  • Boundaries of Gender, Race, and Region
  • Patriotism
  • The Home Front
  • The Politics of Domesticity
  • Margin vs. Center in the Literary World
  • Geographical Margins and Centers
  • Moral or Religious Margins and Centers
  • On the Margins of Gender, Race, Class, or Sexuality
  • National and Regional Literary Reputations
  • Woolson at the Margins of Academia

(more…)

CFP (Extended Deadline): Spring 2015 Special Issue of the Nathaniel Hawthorne Review: “Women, Work, and Hawthorne” (Journal Issue; Deadline: 8.15.14)

CFP: Spring 2015 Special Issue of the Nathaniel Hawthorne Review:

“Women, Work, and Hawthorne”

Extended Deadline: August 15, 2014

“It is odd enough, that the kind of labor which falls to the lot of women is just that which chiefly distinguishes artificial life—the life of degenerated mortals—from the life of Paradise. Eve had no dinner-pot, and no clothes to mend and no washing day.”  So says Miles Coverdale, as he contemplates gendered divisions of labor in The Blithedale Romance. If for Coverdale, women’s work connotes spiritual corruption and class degeneration, elsewhere in Hawthorne’s writings, women’s labor is associated variously with agency, authority, transgression, exploitation, oppression, order, duty, art, power, and magic.  Indeed, when one calls to mind Hawthorne’s well-known statements about women authors—one type of working woman—and the public exposure attendant upon work for women, it is remarkable how many working women populate his texts:  seamstresses, lace-makers, shop-keepers, house-keepers, commercialized spiritualists, and, yes, writers and artists.  The spring 2015 special issue of the Nathaniel Hawthorne Review invites fresh examinations of the topic of women and work in Hawthorne’s fiction, journals, letters, and life. (more…)

Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers: 30th Anniversary Issue

Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers observes its 30th anniversary with the publication of issue 31.1 (Spring 2014)

http://legacywomenwriters.org

ISSUE CONTENTS

“Finding Place to Speak: Sarah Winnemucca’s Rhetorical Practices in Disciplinary Spaces” by Rosalyn Collings Eves

Approaches to Recovering Early Women

Conference presentations from recent Legacy-sponsored panels

  • “States of Recollection: How Seventeenth-Century Women Thought about Recovery and the Atlantic World” by Tamara Harvey
  • “Looking for Stories of Inarticulate Women” by Ava Chamberlain
  • “Interpretative Challenges Posed by the Gendered Performances of Early American Female Criminals” by Amelia C. Lewis
  • “Phillis Wheatley on Friendship” by Tara Bynum
  • “‘Memorials of Exemplary Women Are Peculiarly Interesting’: Female Biography in Early National America” by Lucia McMahon

A Riff, A Call, and A Response: A Forum

Edited by P. Gabrielle Foreman

  • “Better a Bloody Shovel than Ambivalence” by Joycelyn Moody
  • “Do You Have Any Skin in the Game?” by Kimberly Blockett
  • “Out of the Kitchen of the House of Fiction” by M. Giulia Fabi
  • “Twenty-First-Century African American Literary Studies as Movementby Herman Beavers
  • “Race and the Mind/Body Problem” by Katherine Clay Bassard
  • “Whiteness Visible” by John Ernest

Legacy Profile

Mary Dwinell Chellis Lund (1826-1891) by Larisa Asaeli

Excerpt from “Drinking Jack” (1881) by Mary Dwinell Chellis

Legacy Reprint

Introduction: “Investing in Literature: Ernestine Rose and the Harlem Branch Public Library of the 1920s” by Barbara Hochman

“Serving New York’s Black City” by Ernestine Rose

Book Reviews

  • “Critical Legacies”: A special anniversary forum in celebration of Nina Baym’s Woman’s Fiction: A Guide to Novels by and about Women in America, 1820-1870, Frances Smith Foster’s Written By Herself: Literary Production by African American Women, 1746-1892, and Shirley Samuels’ The Culture of Sentiment: Race, Gender, and Sentimentality in 19th-Century America.

Contributors: Marianne Noble, Elizabeth Stockton, Duncan Faherty, John Ernest,  Xiomara Santamarina, Elizabeth Cali, Glenn Hendler, María Carla Sánchez, Jennifer Travis

  • Review Essay “Childish Things”: A Review of Robin Bernstein, Racial Innocence: Performing American Childhood from Slavery to Civil Rights; Kyla Wazana Tompkins, Racial Indigestion: Eating Bodies in the 19th Century; and Courtney Weikle-Mills, Imaginary Citizens: Child Readers and the Limits of American Independence 1640-1868
    Anna Mae Duane, University of Connecticut
  • Reviews

Philosophies of Sex:  Critical Essays on The Hermaphrodite edited by Renée Bergland and Gary Williams

Heather Barrett, Boston University

E. D. E. N. Southworth: Recovering a Nineteenth-Century Popular Novelist by Melissa Homestead and Pamela Washington

Carl Ostrowski, Middle Tennessee State University

To Fight Aloud Is Very Brave: American Poetry and the Civil War by Faith Barrett

Christa Vogelius, University of Michigan

The Selected Letters of Elizabeth Stoddard edited by Jennifer Putzi and Elizabeth Stockton

Nicole Livengood, Marietta College

Domestic Subjects: Gender, Citizenship, and Law in Native American Literature by Beth Piatote

Cari Carpenter, West Virginia University