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Upcoming deadline for USSO blogs: September 30

SSAWW has been invited to contribute to a blog hosted by United States Studies Online (USSO: http://usstudiesonline.com/blog-3/submission-guidelines/). It will involve the creation of 8-10 blog posts of 700-1200 words each.

In terms of theme, USSO argues these blogs can be broad or more specific. SSAWW seeks posts that represent the field of American Women’s writing quite broadly. Our preference is to generate a series of more general than more specific blog posts (though perhaps not exclusively so), with the aim of effecting a reasonable coverage of the field of women’s writing in America – the academic study of it in all its diversity and difference (and including creative writing). Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

-“Lesser Known” American Women Writers
-New Approaches to Canonical American Women Writers
-Digital Resources for American Women Writers
-American Women Writers Abroad
-Recovering American Women Writers: Issues and Strategies
-Contemporary American Women Writers
-American Women Writers Scholarship–Then and Now

If you have questions about generating a blog post, please contact the SSAWW leaders of this project, Dick Ellis, Susan K. Harris, Kristin J. Jacobson, and Kristin Allukian at ssaww.usso@gmail.com.

Our preference, though not exclusively so, is for graduate students and early career researchers to generate these blogs. Co-authorship is welcome. Creativity that accounts for the digital format is also encouraged: unless there are prohibitive copyright issues, posts that incorporate video, image, links to additional digital resources, etc., will be given preference over purely textual entries.

Submissions of complete blog posts received by 30 September 2014 will receive first consideration. Membership in SSAWW is required of all authors selected for publication.

Professor R. J. (Dick) Ellis
President, Society for the Study of American Women Writers

CFP: Stowe Society Panel at SSAWW 2015

The Harriet Beecher Stowe Society invites participants for its upcoming panel at the SSAWW 2015 Conference:

Between Feeling Unsettled and Feeling Right:  Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Targeted Liminality

CFP for Society for the Study of American Women Writers, Philadelphia, PA, November 4-8, 2015

Sponsored by the Harriet Beecher Stowe Society

In The American Porch:  An Informal History of an Informal Place, Michael Dolan asserts that Harriet Beecher Stowe’s “Uncle Tom’s Cabin served its purpose, namely to heighten certain contradictions inherent in American life.”   He points out that many of the novel’s key scenes of emotional potency take place outside of the domestic confines of a home and on a porch, “positioning that ordinary liminal space as a site of enormous transformation.” Thus, Stowe’s novel can be seen as one that self-consciously worked to disrupt the binaries that defined antebellum America.  Under Stowe’s scrutiny, binaries such as race, politics, gender, and even public and private space were used to pique and incite a nineteenth-century audience’s oft conflicted emotions so as to help them to “feel right.”

Keeping with the SSAWW 2015 theme, “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” the Harriet Beecher Stowe Society invites papers that explore Stowe’s self-conscious application of liminality throughout her writing career.  Possible topics include:

  • Stowe’s treatment of mixed-race characters and/or passing
  • Protestantism versus Catholicism
  • sentiment versus rationality
  • constructions of public and private space
  • constructions of public and private life
  • constructions of gender
  • transatlanticism and/or transcontinentalism

Please send abstracts (250-500 words) and a brief bio to LuElla D’Amico (ldamico@whitworth.edu) by January 5, 2015.  While you do not need to be a SSAWW member to apply for a panel, presenters must be or become SSAWW members to participate in the conference, in addition to being members of the Stowe Society.

CFP: SSAWW Panels at ALA Boston 2015

SSAWW Panels at ALA 2015 (Boston, MA  May 2015) 3 January 2015 Deadline
Contact email: kallukian@gatech.edu

The Society for the Study of American Women Writers will host two panels at the American Literature Association Conference (May 2015, Boston). The panel themes anticipate our November 4-8, 2015, conference in Philadelphia: “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives.” The two ALA panels as well as our 2015 conference aim to present the varied ways in which women, as critics, dramatists, educators, essayists, journalists, oral storytellers, poets, novelists, short story writers, and practitioners of both older and emerging forms, invent and reinvent the American literary and cultural landscape. You may submit the same proposal to both conferences, if you wish.

Panel 1: Liminal Spaces in American Women’s Writing
This panel welcomes papers on American women writers in any genre and from any period that explores the concept of liminal spaces. The word “limen,” from which liminality derives, designates threshold. The threshold functions simultaneously as both an obstructive barrier and an enticing opening for the entry into unknown, perhaps unknowable states that invite exploration. Both spatial and temporal, the liminal is a site of in-betweenness enabling non-normative perspectives. It is a site where difference becomes encounter as well as a location that resists assimilation while simultaneously allowing for the dynamic possibilities of fusion that hybridity embraces and articulates. Papers might address such topics as borders and peripheries, liminal spaces in the home, the margin and/or the center, and immigration and/or citizenship.

Panel 2: Hybrid Lives in American Women’s Writings
This panel welcomes papers on American women writers in any genre and from any period that explores the concept of hybrid lives. Often informed by notions of crossing, intersectionality, transition, and transformation, this term contests exclusionary practices involving class, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, and sex, among other variables. Papers might address such topics as the hyphen, collaboration, cross-species encounters: human and animal relationships, transatlantic, transcontinental, and/or transgender.

Please submit to Kristin Allukian (kallukian@gatech.edu) by Jan. 3, 2015, a 250-500 word abstract (note which panel your proposal best fits) and a brief CV (no more than 2-pages) that includes rank/status (e.g. ABD or Associate Professor, etc.), institutional affiliation (independent scholars are welcome to submit proposals), publications, and conference presentations. Confirmation of receipt of your proposal will be sent to you within two business days.

All proposals should be both pasted into the text of the email and included as attachments (preferably as a single PDF document). While you do not need to be a SSAWW member to apply for the panel, presenters must be or become SSAWW members to participate in a SSAWW sponsored panel.

SSAWW Website: http://ssawwnew.wordpress.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SSAmWW
Twitter: @SSAWWrs

Jobs: Assistant Professor of American Literature (pre-1900) at Saint Louis University (Deadline 11.1.14)

Assistant Professor of American Literature (pre-1900)

The Department of English at Saint Louis University, a Catholic Jesuit institution dedicated to student learning, research, health care, and service, seeks applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor in

early and antebellum American literature. Ph.D. must be completed by June 2015.

Applicants should have a significant record of teaching and research in 18th- and 19th-century American literature. We are particularly interested in candidates with transatlantic approaches to the field.

The department offers B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees, and faculty teach at all levels of the curriculum.

Applications must be submitted online at http://jobs.slu.edu, and should include a C.V., letter of application, and writing sample of no more than 25 pages. Additional materials may be requested later. Review of applications will begin on November 1, 2014, and will continue until the position is filled. Interviews at MLA. Start date: August 15, 2015. Email contact: Dr. Hal Bush, Chair of the search committee: bushhk@slu.edu

Saint Louis University is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employer (AA/EOE), and encourages women and minorities to apply.

A Special Issue of Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies The ERA in the 21st Century

A Special Issue of Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies

The ERA in the 21st Century

Guest Editor: Laura Mattoon D’Amore

Due date for receipt of papers is October 1, 2014
The failure of the Equal Rights Amendment links generations of feminists across nearly a century of activism. In 1923, Alice Paul introduced the Equal Rights Amendment to Congress for the first time, demanding equality of rights under the law, regardless of sex. The amendment was introduced unsuccessfully to every Congress since 1923. Though it became a central rallying point for Second Wave feminism, passing both houses of Congress in 1972, it ultimately failed to receive enough state ratifications before its deadline in 1982. Despite its repeated failure the ERA has served as a symbolic torch carried by generations of feminists fighting for women’s rights. (more…)

CFP: Through Laura’s Eyes: Imagery, Illustrations, and Impressions from the Little House (Deadline 12.5.14)

Call for Proposals

“LauraPalooza 2015”

Through Laura’s Eyes: Imagery, Illustrations, and Impressions from the Little House

The National Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association Conference

Sponsored by the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association and South Dakota State University

We invite submissions of paper, panel, and workshop proposals for review and possible acceptance for presentation at the third LauraPalooza conference, to be held on the campus of South Dakota State University in Brookings on July 16-17, 2015. The conference will be followed by a field trip to De Smet, South Dakota, on July 18.

The theme of this year’s conference reflects the word pictures that Laura drew for Mary when she talked, the ones that Laura created on the printed page, and the way that Helen Sewell and Garth Williams brought them to life. It capitalizes on our Brookings, South Dakota, location and the university’s relationship with South Dakota artist (and distant relative of Laura) Harvey Dunn. Potential presenters are welcome to interpret the theme as they like.

“LauraPalooza” embodies the community spirit, work ethic, and social interaction embraced by the Ingalls and Wilder families. Academic presentations mingle with ice cream socials and spelling bees. Join scholars, writers, and professionals who specialize in Ingalls and Wilder literary, historical, and cultural impacts.

  (more…)

CFP: Convention and Contravention: Vexing Gender in Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Writing (Edited Anthology; Deadline 9.12.14)

Call for proposals for edited anthologyConvention and Contravention: Vexing Gender in Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Writing

Editor: Mary Ellen Iatropoulos
CFP Deadline: 9/12/14

When existing conditions actively work to suppress women’s expression, how can the female subject assert herself? How does the space between depiction of and satire/critique of gender roles manifest in nineteenth-century women’s writing? How, through their literary works, do nineteenth-century American women writers engage the space between performing idealized gender roles and affirming or challenging those roles, to depict the female subject negotiating between real self and role self to navigate the world? This CFP seeks essays investigating the relationship between engaging, endorsing, and repudiating restrictive gender roles in nineteenth-century American women’s literature. Topics for investigating the relationship between engaging, endorsing, and repudiating restrictive gender roles in nineteenth-century American women’s literature may include: the cult of domesticity, the Poetess figure, antebellum aesthetics, literary sentimentality, variations on the “angel at the hearth” trope, etc. Essays focusing on works by specific writers are welcome, as are comparative essays investigating thematic connections throughout a selection of works.

Please send 300-500 word abstracts to Mary Ellen Iatropoulos atmaryiatrop@gmail.com by noon on Friday, September 12th, 2014.

Accepted contributors will be informed by October 1st, 2014. First drafts will be due in December, and final drafts will be due in March 2015 with the goal of a Fall 2015 publication date.

Abstract Deadline: 9/12/14

Please include with your abstract: Name, Affiliation, Email address, and Postal address

(more…)

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