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CFP: SSAWW 2015 – Deadline: 14 November 2014

For SSAWW’s forthcoming 2015 conference on “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” we are assembling a panel focused on contested boundaries of race, class, and sexuality in women’s nineteenth- and twentieth-century regional literature. Current papers for the session focus on contested gender roles in the work of New England authors Sarah Orne Jewett and Mary Wilkins Freeman, depictions of contested racial and regional identities in the work of antebellum antislavery novelist Mattie Griffith, and representations of the rural in the late twentieth century queer press.  Please submit any queries and 250 word abstracts to Myrto Drizou (mdrizou@valdosta.edu) and Holly Kent (hkent3@uis.edu) by Friday, November 14th.

CFP for SSAWW 2015 (11.1.14)

Lives Welded and Woven: Women Writers and American Arts & Crafts (Deadline: 11.1.14)

The 2015 Society for the Study of American Women Writers Conference (Philadelphia, PA, November 4-8, 2015)

Addressing the conference theme of “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” this panel will explore the lives and work of women writers and activists whose socio-political vision found expression both in prose and the plastic arts. At the turn of the century, several important female-centered Arts & Crafts communities formed in Deerfield, MA; Chicago; and New York; in addition to smaller communities throughout the country. We welcome papers that focus on well-known figures in this movement such as Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr as well as lesser-known figures like Madeline Yale Wynne and Gertrude Christian Fosdick (among many others). How did this largely female-centered American movement depart from its roots in Ruskinian thought? What is the relationship between the social programs, fiction, non-fiction, and works of plastic art the movement produced? What insights does the context of the movement bring to bear on contemporaneous literature? Proposals might also consider the legacy of Arts & Crafts feminism; the role of craft magazines; or American women writers from any period who simultaneously produced a significant body of work in ceramics, weaving, metalsmithing, etc.

Email proposals to Arielle Zibrak at azibrak@gmail.com by November 1 2014. Please include a 250-500 word abstract and a brief CV (no more than 2-pages) that includes rank/status (e.g. ABD or Associate Professor, etc.), institutional affiliation (independent scholars are welcome to submit proposals), publications, and conference presentations. All proposals should be both pasted into the text of the email and included as attachments (preferably as a single PDF document). While you do not need to be a SSAWW member to apply for a panel, presenters must be or become SSAWW members to participate in the conference.

CFP for SSAWW 2015 Panel: Rhyme as Liminal Space in Nineteenth Century Poetry (Deadline: Jan. 1, 2015)

CFP for a panel on rhyme in nineteenth century poetry for next fall’s SSAWW conference.

CFP: Rhyme as Liminal Space in Nineteenth Century Poetry (Deadline: Jan. 1, 2015)

Nineteenth century poetry is overwhelmingly driven by its rhymes, yet it is also overwhelmingly maligned for them. Very often, the kinds of rhymes in these poems are viewed as rigid, stultifying, predictable, or old-fashioned—as “mere jingling,” not worthy of much serious attention. Poet A.E. Stallings, however, writing in 2009, describes rhyme of any kind as a liminal space where something mysterious and transformative happens between words: “Rhyme is an irrational, sensual link between two words. It is chemical. It is alchemical.” Using Stallings’s definition as point of departure, this panel welcomes papers on any aspect of rhyme in poetry by nineteenth century American women, including (but not limited to) the following:

  • True rhyme
  • Slant rhyme
  • Eye rhyme
  • Stock rhyme, expected rhyme, “bad” rhyme
  • Rhyme in political poetry
  • Rhyme and genre
  • Rhyme and form
  • Rhyme and performance
  • Rhyme and humor
  • Rhyme and emotion
  • Rhyme and inversion
  • “Feminine” rhymes

Please send an abstract (300-500 words) and a brief bio to Melissa Range at melissa.h.range@lawrence.edu by January 1, 2015.

SSAWW 2015 Panel CFP: Harriet Beecher Stowe Society at SSAWW 2015

The Harriet Beecher Stowe Society invites participants for its upcoming panel at the SSAWW 2015 Conference:

Between Feeling Unsettled and Feeling Right:  Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Targeted Liminality
CFP for Society for the Study of American Women Writers, Philadelphia, PA, November 4-8, 2015

Sponsored by the Harriet Beecher Stowe Society

In The American Porch:  An Informal History of an Informal Place, Michael Dolan asserts that Harriet Beecher Stowe’s “Uncle Tom’s Cabin served its purpose, namely to heighten certain contradictions inherent in American life.”   He points out that many of the novel’s key scenes of emotional potency take place outside of the domestic confines of a home and on a porch, “positioning that ordinary liminal space as a site of enormous transformation.” Thus, Stowe’s novel can be seen as one that self-consciously worked to disrupt the binaries that defined antebellum America.  Under Stowe’s scrutiny, binaries such as race, politics, gender, and even public and private space were used to pique and incite a nineteenth-century audience’s oft conflicted emotions so as to help them to “feel right.” (more…)

CFP: Stowe Society Panel at SSAWW 2015

The Harriet Beecher Stowe Society invites participants for its upcoming panel at the SSAWW 2015 Conference:

Between Feeling Unsettled and Feeling Right:  Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Targeted Liminality

CFP for Society for the Study of American Women Writers, Philadelphia, PA, November 4-8, 2015

Sponsored by the Harriet Beecher Stowe Society

In The American Porch:  An Informal History of an Informal Place, Michael Dolan asserts that Harriet Beecher Stowe’s “Uncle Tom’s Cabin served its purpose, namely to heighten certain contradictions inherent in American life.”   He points out that many of the novel’s key scenes of emotional potency take place outside of the domestic confines of a home and on a porch, “positioning that ordinary liminal space as a site of enormous transformation.” Thus, Stowe’s novel can be seen as one that self-consciously worked to disrupt the binaries that defined antebellum America.  Under Stowe’s scrutiny, binaries such as race, politics, gender, and even public and private space were used to pique and incite a nineteenth-century audience’s oft conflicted emotions so as to help them to “feel right.” (more…)

SSAWW 2015 Proposed Panel: Kay Boyle’s Short Fiction (Deadline 1.9.15)

Kay Boyle’s Short Fiction

Kay Boyle Society at Society for the Study of American Women Writers, Philadelphia, PA, November 4-8, 2015

In accordance with the SSAWW shared theme of Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives, we invite papers that engage Kay Boyle’s short fiction from any perspective. In particular, we encourage critical or pedagogical treatments of her short fiction that explore Boyle’s propensity to illuminate boundaries, crossings, and the subversive. Boyle’s short stories provide rich sites to interrogate transgression and marginality.

Paper proposals and CVs should be sent by January 9th to Anne Reynes-Delobel and Caroline Maun, anne.reynes@univ-amu.fr and caroline.maun@wayne.edu.

SSAWW 2015 Conference Local Representatives Needed

Dear Colleagues,
The Conference Planning Committee is looking for a local representative or representatives for the 2015 conference in Philadelphia.
We already have someone looking into the area restaurants, but other responsibilities would include drawing attention to cultural activities, special exhibitions, library holdings that may be of special interest to our members, among other possibilities.
Advertising the conference specifically to local colleges and universities would also be helpful.
We also need practical advice on transportation, taxis, etc., and perhaps some on the ground, last minute things that can’t be done from a distance. This would not be onerous.
Please let us know if you are interested/willing/able to volunteer for this: SSAWW2015.query@gmail.com
Best wishes for the term to you all,
Rita on behalf of the Conference Planning Committee

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