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CFPs for Panels

Calls for Papers for Prospective SSAWW 2015 Panels

To call for proposals for a panel,

  send your CFP to ssaww2015.web@gmail.com for posting here

and on the first page of the site. Panels are listed in the order in which they were received, with the most recent at the top of the page. Dates listed beside the panel title are the deadline dates.

Please submit individual proposals and completed panel proposals to ssaww2015.submit@gmail.com.



On the Boundary between Public and Private: Rethinking Willa Cather’s Letters (DEADLINE EXTENDED January 15, 2015)

The Cather Foundation solicits proposals on topics related to Cather’s letters for a panel at the Society for the Studies of American Women Writers conference in Philadelphia November 4-8, 2015. For many years, biographers and critics who consulted Willa Cather’s letters could refer to their contents only in paraphrase because of restrictions in Cather’s will. Cather’s insistence that her letters not be published or quoted from and stories about the burning of her letters also became a key component of many interpretations of Cather’s life and works. With the lifting of the ban on publication and quotation, the appearance of The Selected Letters of Willa Cather in 2013, a complete digital edition of the letters underway, and the regular discovery of previously-unknown letters, the time is ripe to rethink Cather’s letters and their place in scholarship.

What can Cather’s letters tell us about her works and her life? What can’t they tell us? Now that scholars can quote from her letters, what can we say about Cather’s voice in her letters and her engagement with the letter as genre? Considering the survival of over 3,000 letters in libraries, was Cather as obsessed with privacy as some previously claimed based in part on stories about the destruction of letters? What public function did Cather’s letters have when she wrote them, and what public function to they have now?

Proposals on these and other topics concerning Cather’s letters are solicited. Depending on the number of proposals, more than one panel or a roundtable of shorter presentations may be constructed. Please e-mail a 250-300 word abstract and a 1-page c.v. to Melissa J. Homestead at mhomestead2@unl.edu by January 15, 2015.


 

“Written By Herself”: Dialogue in African American Women’s Self-Writing

 CFP: Texas Regional SSAWW group at SSAWW Conference, November 4-8, 2015 in Philadelphia, PA

Deadline: January 20, 2015

The Texas Regional SSAWW group invited scholars to submit abstracts for its panel at the SSAWW Conference. We welcome abstracts about doing scholarly work on the self-writing of black American women. This panel examines autobiographies, memoirs, and diaries of black American women writers and dialogue that develops between the scholars who work on them and the original author and text. 

Over the past two hundred and fifty years African American women writers and literary scholars have collaborated to create and represent the lives and voices of black women: from Frances Smith Foster’s Written by Herself: Literary Production by African American Women, 1746-1892 in 1979 to Akasha Gloria Hull’s discovery and publication of Give Us Each Day: The Diary of Alice Dunbar-Nelson in 1986; from Audre Lorde’s own memoir The Cancer Journalspublished in 1980 to Joycelyn Moody’s Sentimental Confessions: Spiritual Narratives of Nineteenth- Century African American Women in 2003 and Rhondda Robinson Thomas’ A Nickel and A Prayer: The Autobiography of Jane Edna Hunter in 2011.

This panel explores, but is not limited to, issues such as: 

  • Current issues of recovery
  • Questions of collaboration between author and recovery scholar
  • Authorial bargaining within cultural environment
  • Race, gender, and representation
  • Intersectional identity versus/in conjunction with identity as assemblage
  • Mediating sexuality
  • Voice and language
  • Unique aspects of structure, genre, and literary mode

Email a 300-word abstract to Sabrina Starnaman at sabrinastarnaman@gmail.com by January 20, 2015. While you do not need to be an SSAWW member to submit a proposal, you must be a member of the SSAWW to present at this panel at the time of the conference.


20th-Century Women Writers and the Natural World (January 12th, 2015)

Call for papers for the Society for the Study of American Women Writers 2015 Conference
November 4-8, 2015, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

In the latter part of the twentieth-century, ecofeminists posited the parallel between the subjugation of women and the commodification and exploitation of the natural world.  In a similar vein, and addressing the SSAWW’s conference theme of “Liminal Spaces/Hybrid Lives,” this panel seeks a broad range of papers exploring how 20th-Century American women writers represent their complex relation to natural spaces, landscape, or nonhuman nature.  What does the female subject’s relation to the natural world look like? In what ways do women writers attempt to account for alienation from it? And how do they challenge the oppressive structures that engender this sense of loss? In what ways might they strategically (re)invent relationships with the natural world to advocate for greater connectivity, community-building, and egalitarianism?  Please submit a 250-word abstract and a brief biography to Robert Fillman at rff212@lehigh.edu by January 12th, 2015.


 

Women Writers of the Harlem Renaissance (January 15, 2015)
Traditionally, women writers of the Harlem Renaissance era from Nella Larsen to Jessie Redmon Fauset to Marita Bonner, among others, have been under-represented in criticism both past and present. The concept of the New Negro, after all, was gendered male, excluding the value role that women writers would play in not only challenging the pervasive color line but in calling increased attention to the depths of African-American experience that, as Zora Neale Hurston posits, white publishers would not print. Reflecting on the conference theme, “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” this panel asks how African-American women writers of the Harlem Renaissance negotiated their dual status as women and black in text. How did authors such as Larsen, Fauset, Hurston, and beyond challenge the limited roles of black women to overcome what many now recognize as a culturally subservient and second-class hybrid status? And how do these works provide new insight into the New Negro woman whose various forms of art and expression helped to resurrect the African-American voice too long silent or silenced?
This panel will therefore examine specially how black women writers challenged their perpetual marginalizing and alienation along racial and gender lines. This panel seeks to include authors of the Harlem Renaissance both well-known and under-represented in an attempt to expand the conversation of the era beyond what Miriam Thaggert terms, “the well worn Harlem Renaissance or New Negro paradigms.” Some possible topics might include:
 hybridity of multi-racial characters
 alternative psycho-social sites in Harlem Renaissance literature
 any other topic on fiction, non-fiction, letters, plays, and poetry written by African American women during the Harlem Renaissance
Please send 250-350 word proposals, a CV, and a short biographical statement to Christopher Allen Varlack at cvarlack@umbc.edu by January 15, 2015.

Drawn from the Archive: Reorienting Landscapes at the Turn of the Twentieth Century (January 15)

Call for Papers: SSAWW Conference 2015

Taking up the conference theme of “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” this panel will investigate work produced by women in the United States at the turn of the twentieth century for whom human interaction with the landscape was a central artistic concern. These women oriented themselves to the landscape through travel and exploration, desire and consumption, and through artistic representation reimagined the body, history, social-sexual formations, racial and gender categories, and sometimes humanness itself. Such reorienting encounters with landscape, meanwhile, formed part of late-nineteenth-century leisure class tourism and the romantic consumption of the natural world at a moment of expanded U.S. imperialism both at home and abroad.

We invite papers that take up some dimension of women’s reorienting of landscape during the late nineteenth or early twentieth century. We encourage submissions that examine lesser-known or hitherto unexamined archival materials, especially those that focus on women working across any combination of the material, visual, and literary arts.

Please send a 250-word abstract and a brief bio (in Word or Adobe) to Samaine Lockwood and Tiffany Aldrich MacBain at tamacbain@pugetsound.edu by January 15.


 

CFP: What is a woman writer? (January 30, 2015)

SSAWW 2015 – Philadelphia, PA

Abstract submissions due to Julia Dauer (jdauer@wisc.edu) by January 30, 2015

As attention to the book as an object continues to thrive in literary studies, questions about who counts as a women writer take on new dimensions. This panel invites papers considering“women writers” working as editors or artists to hybridize existing texts, and especially the waythose working in the 20th and 21st centuries make use of 19th-century archives. How, for example,does Kara Walker’s “reading” of nineteenth-century culture in her silhouette work conceptualizerace and fantasy in the archive? How does the work of Maureen Cummins, Ann Lovett, and other book artists challenge us to think about books and the women who produce them in new or different ways? In what ways does women’s work as editors, archivists, or artists preserve or transform literary traditions? What agency or creative power do women writers and artists gain by working with existing materials to fashion new accounts of historical experience? How does this work impact our view of the history of women’s writing, or of women writers’ relation to the American past?

This panel welcomes papers addressing women working as

 artists

 book artists

 scrapbook makers

 diarists

 archivists

 newspaper, periodical, or giftbook editors

 illustrators

 bloggers

 or other in other roles that rely on textual remixing or hybridization


 

The Transgressive Humor of American Women Writers (January 15, 2015)

Call for papers for the Society for the Study of American Women Writers

 November 4-8, 2015, Philadelphia

This panel will look at the politics of women’s humor and its potential power of transgression and transformation.  Women’s humor can be seen as an indirect form of social protest and has been contested among feminist critics as a potential source of sublimation and perpetuation of the status quo as well as a source of transgression and social change.  Submissions on all forms and periods of women’s humor welcome, including fiction, poetry, drama, satire, wit, irony, stand-up comedy, situation comedy, cartoons, both historical and contemporary.

Please e-mail  250-word abstract and brief bio to Sabrina.FuchsAbrams@esc.edu by January 15, 2015.


Roundtable: Young Adult Women’s Literature and Boundary Blurring (Deadline: January 15, 2015)

Call for Papers for SSAWW Conference November 4-8, 2015, Philadelphia

This roundtable, Young Adult Women’s Literature and Boundary Blurring, explores how teen or YA literature by American women writers occupies liminal spaces and blurs boundaries. Like the teen, YA literature exists in a state of flux. It is often relegated to a space between “lowbrow” and “highbrow” literature, it has a multi-aged readership though designated for teens, and it is considered a relatively new genre despite actually existing for centuries.

Panelists are invited to explore these and any other related topics:

 crossover writers – authors who blur the boundary between academic/popular and adult/teen, such as Joyce Carol Oates

 hybrid audiences – the appeal of teen fiction, such as The Hunger Games, to not-

so-young adults

 historical context– the contemporary explosion of the YA market; re-

conceptualizing genres of women’s writing that pre-date the 1890s (when theconcept of adolescence emerged)

 practical pedagogy – experiences teaching YA women’s literature in the college classroom

 current debates – who should read YA fiction; sexism and elitism among YA critics

Please email proposals to Lisa Koch, LKoch@gmu.edu by January 15, 2015. Include the
following information:
 Name and affiliation (if any)
 Title of presentation
 Abstract (150-250 words)
 Brief biography (60 word limit)
 Email contact

Authorship as Hybridity: Women, Writing, and Representation in Early America (January 15, 2015)

The Society of Early Americanists invites submissions for its upcoming panel at the triennial meeting of the Society for the Study of American Women Writers, November 4-8, 2015, in Philadelphia.

Given the conference theme of “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” we seek papers that address issues of liminality and hybridity in texts written by and/or about women in early America to approximately 1800. We are particularly interested in papers that interrogate traditional notions of authorship, which typically render women in the early period as silent, non-writing objects. However, as Roland Barthes has argued, authorship is inherently a hybrid, collaborative endeavor. We seek papers, then, that explore the ways in which women helped to shape the cultural landscape of early America both as writing and non-writing subjects. We especially welcome papers that explore new methodologies and archives that broaden conversations about gender, representation/mediation, and authorship. In addition, we will consider papers addressing issues of authorship and women in times and spaces that interrogate terms like “early” and “America.”

Papers might address questions such as the following: What constitutes an archive when examining the lives and/or literature of women in early America? What kind of approaches might we employ to read early source material beyond the limitations of conventional paradigms, especially related to notions of authorship? In other words, what does it mean to be a woman writing in early America? How might women have affected literary production in this era without assuming the traditional role of authorship?

If interested, please email a one-page CV and 300-word abstract to Cassander Smith at clsmith17@ua.edu byJanuary 15, 2015. In the subject line for the email, write “SEA at SSAWW.”


Women Writers and the Law: Liminal Moments for 19th-century American Women (January 5, 2015)

Call for Papers for SSAWW

Philadelphia, November 4-8, 2015

Sponsored by the Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers Study Group

The nineteenth century was a period of intense questioning of the law, both on a federal level and among the states. Women found themselves in a neither/nor transitional state. They had no legal power. Yet they were all impacted by laws, and many were passionate about legal issues. Even though they could not be lawyers or legislators, women wrote about the law and its impact on people. We welcome papers on the treatment by women writers (in fiction or non-fiction) of any of the many legal issues of the time. Papers might focus on such topics as suffrage, slavery, married women’s property, copyright, child custody, divorce, or any other legal questions of the time. Email 200-word abstract and short bio to joyce.warren@qc.cuny.edu by January 5, 2015.


Teaching American Women Writers with Digital Tools, Platforms, and Projects (December 15, 2014)

This roundtable will showcase how scholars have used digital tools and platforms to teach the work of American women writers. Projects and assignments at all levels of technological complexity are welcome: anything from individual assignments using Twitter, Pinterest, or other online tools to digital editions or galleries built in WordPress, Scalar, or Omeka. Some of these projects and assignments may fall under the rubric of “digital humanities,” but participants need not consider themselves “digital humanists” to apply. The only restriction is that the project or assignment must be pedagogical in nature, involving undergraduate (and perhaps graduate) students in the use or creation of digital tools for the study of American women writers.

Please send a 250- to 500-word abstract describing your project or assignment and discussing its pedagogical purpose and degree of success. Discussions of failed assignments/projects or those that could be improved are welcome; good pedagogy is an additive and iterative process! Presenters are also welcome to address the difficulties of designing and implementing digital assignments and projects (these might include lack of access to source materials, poor on-campus technical support, or other hurdles). Please also describe the audio-visual setup you will need at the conference (if any) in order to present or demonstrate your assignment/project.

Please send abstracts to reeda@email.unc.edu by December 15, 2014. 


“Lydia Maria Child and Social Change” (January 14, 2015)
Call for Papers:

The Lydia Maria Child Society invites proposals for the Society for the Study of American Women Writers Conference to be held November 4-8, 2015 in Philadelphia, PA.

Much of Child’s work addresses, if not directly calls for, social change. In engaging with the status of women, the condition of slaves, the removal policies for Native Americans, the situations facing the urban poor, etc., Child envisions and enacts the sorts of boundary-crossing communications that can instigate change. In her fiction and non-fiction, she often explores the experiences of those who occupy liminal spaces in their relation to the dominant culture, while embracing hybridity as the key to America’s future. The Society invites submissions on any of the following topics:

Processes of social reform/change
Hybridity and American identity
Cultural exchange in Child’s life/writing
Childhood as liminal experience
Crossing boundaries of gender, race, or social class
The periodical or journalistic sketch as hybrid form/Child’s use of hybrid genres
The domestic sphere as liminal space
Intersections through collaboration
Insider/Outsider status

These topics are meant to be suggestive not exhaustive and any papers on Child that relate to the conference theme “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives” are welcome.

Please send 250-300 word abstracts and a 1-page CV to Sarah.Olivier@du.edu by January 14, 2015. Indicate if you will need any A/V equipment.

The Lydia Maria Child Society is in the early stages of development. If you would like to be involved, join our listserv at https://listserv.du.edu/mailman/listinfo/lmchild-society.


CFP for SSAWW 2015: Caroline M. Kirkland Revisited (Deadline: 1.15.15)

Caroline M. Kirkland has been credited as a pioneering realist. Her writings about life in Michigan in the 1830s and 1840s provided some of the first realistic accounts of the frontier. She was an important literary journalist, an active social reformer, an outspoken abolitionist, and an influential magazine editor. Although her works are taught and written about frequently, conference panels devoted to her works have been surprisingly far and few between. This panel hopes to redress this by inviting proposals on any topic related to the study of Kirkland and her works. In keeping with the conference theme of “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” we welcome especially papers that engage issues of liminality or hybridity. Some of the topics suggested by SSAWW include the following:

  • Alienation and/or disillusionment as states of in-betweenness
  • Borders and peripheries
  • Boundaries between/ within the built environment and/or the natural environment
  • Crossings
  • In between public and private
  • Historical constructions of space, place, and home
  • Liminal spaces in the home
  • Inside and outside—the academy, the canon, etc.
  • Transatlantic
  • Transcontinental

See http://ssawwnew.wordpress.com/2015-conference/ssaww-2015-call-for-papers-deadline-2-13-15/ for more information. Presentations will be limited to 15-20 minutes to accommodate 3 or 4 presenters.

Please send abstracts (250-300 words) and a brief bio or CV to todd.goddard@uvu.edu by January 15, 2015.


Marriage and Single Life in Catharine Sedgwick’s Writings (December 31, 2014)

The Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society seeks proposals for a panel on the question of marriage vs. single life in Sedgwick’s writings for the SSAWW Conference in Philadelphia, Nov. 4-8, 2015. This panel topic honors the 2015 publication of Deborah Gussman’s new edition of Sedgwick’s final novel, Married or Single?, which was originally published in 1857.

From early in her career until her last full-length novel, Sedgwick and her characters consider the question of whether it is preferable to marry or remain single—for what reasons and under what circumstances. Beyond the decision of whether to marry at all, Sedgwick and her characters—both male and female—explore issues of parenting, spousal abuse, divorce, widowhood, friendship, emotional fulfillment, financial dependence and independence, and women’s vocations and contributions to society beyond marriage and motherhood.

Proposals on these or other aspects of the issue of marriage vs. single life in any of Sedgwick’s writings are welcome, but the Society particularly encourages proposals that view marriage and/or single life in relation to the overall conference theme of liminality. Is it useful to consider either marriage or single life as a liminal state in relation to the other—or in relation to some other social category? Is long-term single life a liminal state, and, if it is, does it empower or disenfranchise those who inhabit it? If a society views marriage as the desirable, “normal,” human state, is it still possible to view married women as occupying a liminal space between her own individual identity and her husband’s identity?

Send proposals of no more than 250 words to Jenifer_Elmore@pba.edu by December 31, 2014.


CFP: “A Self in Relation”: 20th Century American Women Writers Imagine and Write Female “Family” Relations (December 15, 2014)

Panel Description:

In her groundbreaking text The Reproduction of Mothering (1978) feminist psychoanalytic theorist Nancy Chodorow explores how women “come into being as a self […] in relation to our primary others.” In Chodorow’s schema, the “primary other” for females is the mother, and it is through girls’ and women’s imagined and real relationship to the mother that we “experience a self in relation,” a self that is both like and unlike the female other/mother. Feminist scholars such as Jessica Benjamin and Ann DuCille trouble the waters of Chodorow’s theory of the “primary other,” interrogate what they and others regard as a race and class solipsism, and insist on a consideration also of the mother’s/daughter’s materiality. Addressing the conference theme of “Liminal Spaces/Hybrid Lives,” this panel considers how twentieth-century American women writers imagine and write materialist as well as psycho-emotional difference between girls and women who function as family. Current papers for this panel address mother-daughter conflict in the work of Elizabeth Lorde-Rollins, Fannie Hurst, and Toni Morrison. Please submit a 250-word abstract along with a brief bio to Cheryl R. Hopson at chopson1@gru.edu no later than December 15, 2014.


“Women Playwrights of the Harlem Renaissance” (January 15th, 2015)

Taking a cue from the conference theme, “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” this panel asks how African American women playwrights worked out questions of liminality and hybridity in dramatic texts during the period now known as the Harlem Renaissance. The Harlem Renaissance itself emerges out of and as a liminal (temporal) space: it comes at the turn of the century and represents, in some interpretations, a movement itself positioned as a kind of “limin” or “threshold” for Black writers and artists to enter into American citizenship through the arena of cultural production. In terms of drama, Soyica Diggs Colbert writes that “attributing value to black folk unites the drama of the Harlem Renaissance” insofar as by writing dramas that stage the value of Black people and Black cultures, the plays of the time sought to transition the position of African Americans within the hierarchies of U.S. social organization.

The panel will expand from here and examine specifically how women playwrights – themselves navigating the hybrid task of what Bernice Johnson Reagan calls “straddling” as people marginalized along lines of both race and sex – thought about, addressed, and highlighted issues of liminality and hybridity during a time which itself was characterized by these two concepts. Potential presenters are encouraged to expand on, challenge, and/or loosen the parameters of the senses of “liminality” and “hybridity” described here.

Some possible topics might include:

  • -Hybridity of multi-racial characters
  • -Motherhood and mothering as “liminal” acts
  • -Blackness as a liminal site of “becoming”
  • -Liminality in the face of lynching as an identity-fixing violent terror
  • -queer liminality
  • -Hybrid dramaturgical techniques
  • -Harlem Renaissance as “liminal” space
  • -liminality and hybridity of performance and/or theater
  • -any other topic on plays written by African American women during the Harlem Renaissance

Please send 250-350 word proposals and a short biographical statement to Jesse Goldberg, jag525@cornell.edu, by January 15th, 2015.


“Catching the Spirit”: Women’s Reading, Writing and Reform during the Long Nineteenth Century (Deadline January 1, 2015)

Thanks to the pioneering work of a generation of women’s historians – Anne Boylan, Mary Kelley, Carolyn J. Lawes,  Anne Firor Scott, and others – scholars now know a great deal more about the scope and variety of the women’s organizations that formed in the mid to late 19th century, particularly in the northeast, where archival records are generally better preserved and more readily accessible via libraries and institutions providing research fellowships to visiting scholars. Understandably, much of the earlier scholarship on women and social reform targeted the most pressing issues of the 19th century: abolitionism, temperance, prison reform, suffrage, the peace movement, and the like. Other scholars – Catherine Hobbs, Joan Marie Johnson, Catherine Kerrison,  Anastatia Sims, and  Elizabeth Hayes Turner – just to name a few, have expanded the study of women’s clubs and activism beyond the northeast. In addition, scholars like Mary Kelley have pursued research that examines not just what women were doing in their clubs, but what they were reading andwriting as well. This avenue of research into the intellectual lives of American women via their literary clubs and mental improvement societies particularly invites additional contributions from literary historians and women’s studies scholars. This work challenges us to take seriously SSAWW as a venue for showcasing work on “women writers” not just “women authors.” This panel invites paper proposals that examine the intersection of women’s reading, writing and reform work during the long nineteenth century.

Email paper proposals to Cynthia Patterson at cpatterson@usf.edu by January 1, 2015. Please include a 250-500 word abstract and a brief CV (no more than 2 pages), that includes rank/status , institutional affiliation, publications and conference presentations. All proposal materials should be both pasted into the text of the email and included as attachments (preferably in Word format).


Lives Welded and Woven: Women Writers and American Arts & Crafts (Updated Deadline: 11.15.14)

The 2015 Society for the Study of American Women Writers Conference (Philadelphia, PA, November 4-8, 2015)

Addressing the conference theme of “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” this panel will explore the lives and work of women writers and activists whose socio-political vision found expression both in prose and the plastic arts. At the turn of the century, several important female-centered Arts & Crafts communities formed in Deerfield, MA; Chicago; and New York; in addition to smaller communities throughout the country. We welcome papers that focus on well-known figures in this movement such as Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr as well as lesser-known figures like Madeline Yale Wynne and Gertrude Christian Fosdick (among many others). How did this largely female-centered American movement depart from its roots in Ruskinian thought? What is the relationship between the social programs, fiction, non-fiction, and works of plastic art the movement produced? What insights does the context of the movement bring to bear on contemporaneous literature? Proposals might also consider the legacy of Arts & Crafts feminism; the role of craft magazines; or the work of American women writers from any period who simultaneously produced a significant body of work in ceramics, weaving, metalsmithing, etc.

Email proposals to Arielle Zibrak at azibrak@gmail.com by November 1 2014. Please include a 250-500 word abstract and a brief CV (no more than 2-pages) that includes rank/status (e.g. ABD or Associate Professor, etc.), institutional affiliation (independent scholars are welcome to submit proposals), publications, and conference presentations. All proposals should be both pasted into the text of the email and included as attachments (preferably as a single PDF document). While you do not need to be a SSAWW member to apply for a panel, presenters must be or become SSAWW members to participate in the conference.


CFP for SSAWW 2015: Married and Single Life in Sedgwick’s Writing (EXTENDED Deadline: 12.30.14)

The Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society seeks proposals for a panel on the question of marriage vs. single life in Sedgwick’s writings for the SSAWW Conference in Philadelphia, Nov. 4-8, 2015. This panel topic honors the 2015 publication of Deborah Gussman’s new edition of Sedgwick’s final novel, Married or Single?, which was originally published in 1857.

From early in her career until her last full-length novel, Sedgwick and her characters consider the question of whether it is preferable to marry or remain single—for what reasons and under what circumstances. Beyond the decision of whether to marry at all, Sedgwick and her characters—both male and female—explore issues of parenting, spousal abuse, divorce, widowhood, friendship, emotional fulfillment, financial dependence and independence, and women’s vocations and contributions to society beyond marriage and motherhood.

Proposals on these or other aspects of the issue of marriage vs. single life in any of Sedgwick’s writings are welcome, but the Society particularly encourages proposals that view marriage and/or single life in relation to the overall conference theme of liminality. Is it useful to consider either marriage or single life as a liminal state in relation to the other—or in relation to some other social category? Is long-term single life a liminal state, and, if it is, does it empower or disenfranchise those who inhabit it? If a society views marriage as the desirable, “normal,” human state, is it still possible to view married women as occupying a liminal space between her own individual identity and her husband’s identity?

Send proposals of no more than 250 words to Jenifer_Elmore@pba.edu by December 30, 2014.


CFP ASAIL Panel at SSAWW 2015 (Deadline: 11.30.2014)

Contact email: Cari.Carpenter@mail.wvu.edu

ASAIL will host one panel at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers Conference (October 2015, Philadelphia). The panel topic is relatively open, but papers should focus on American Indian women writers. Please send a 250-word abstract and a brief cv (1-2 pages) to Cari Carpenter by Nov. 30.

Panelists may choose to engage with the conference themes: liminality and hybridity.


On the Boundary between Public and Private: Rethinking Willa Cather’s Letters (December 15, 2014)

The Cather Foundation solicits proposals on topics related to Cather’s letters for a panel at the Society for the Studies of American Women Writers conference in Philadelphia November 4-8, 2015. For many years, biographers and critics who consulted Willa Cather’s letters could refer to their contents only in paraphrase because of restrictions in Cather’s will. Cather’s insistence that her letters not be published or quoted from and stories about the burning of her letters also became a key component of many interpretations of Cather’s life and works. With the lifting of the ban on publication and quotation, the appearance of The Selected Letters of Willa Cather in 2013, a complete digital edition of the letters underway, and the regular discovery of previously-unknown letters, the time is ripe to rethink Cather’s letters and their place in scholarship.

What can Cather’s letters tell us about her works and her life? What can’t they tell us? Now that scholars can quote from her letters, what can we say about Cather’s voice in her letters and her engagement with the letter as genre? Considering the survival of over 3,000 letters in libraries, was Cather as obsessed with privacy as some previously claimed based in part on stories about the destruction of letters? What public function did Cather’s letters have when she wrote them, and what public function to they have now?

Proposals on these and other topics concerning Cather’s letters are solicited. Depending on the number of proposals, more than one panel or a roundtable of shorter presentations may be constructed. Please e-mail a 250-300 word abstract and a 1-page c.v. to Melissa J. Homestead at mhomestead2@unl.edu by December 15, 2014.


 

CFP: Constance Fenimore Woolson Society: (Deadline January 5, 2015)

“Constance Fenimore Woolson: Geographic Borders, Social Crossings”

The Constance Fenimore Woolson Society invites paper submissions for the CFW Society’s panel at the SSAWW Triennial Conference in Philadelphia, PA 2015. In keeping with SSAWW’s conference theme of “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” this panel will explore Woolson’s liminal status as regionalist, international traveler, and genre-crossing woman writer. The Society warmly welcomes paper proposals on any of the following topics/keywords:

  • Woolson’s multi-regional fiction
  • Woolson’s international writing and travel experience
  • Woolson’s poetry and/or travel writing in addition to her fiction
  • Woolson’s relationship to the physical body: gender expectations, disability, or travel
  • Woolson and biography: revisiting critical responses to Woolson, Woolson and Henry James
  • Woolson and the animal world: dogs, horses, other non-human denizens of the Southern swamp or Upper Midwest
  • Childhood as liminal space: Woolson’s representations of children
  • Crossing social boundaries: representations of familial or interpersonal intimacies in Woolson’s work
  • Crossing historical markers: Woolson and the Civil War, Woolson and westward expansion, Woolson and international tourism
  • Crossing boundaries of gender, region, nation, or genre

While this list provides some conceptual suggestions for thinking about Woolson, her work, and her time, the CFW Society gladly accepts paper proposals on any topic related to Woolson and her contemporaries. Please send an abstract of 250-300 words and a one-page CV to Sarah H. Salter at ssalter2@gmail.com by January 5, 2015. This panel organized and supported by the Constance Fenimore Woolson Society, Dr. Anne Boyd Rioux, President.

For more information about the life, writings, and legacies of Constance Fenimore Woolson, explore the new Woolson website: http://constancefenimorewoolson.wordpress.com/

For more information about the conference in Philadelphia, check out SSAWW conference information:

http://ssawwnew.wordpress.com/2015-conference/ssaww-2015-call-for-papers-deadline-2-13-15/


The Society for American Travel Writing (Deadline: 15 December 2014)

The Society for American Travel Writing invites submissions for its upcoming panel at the triennial meeting of the Society for the Study of American Women Writers, November 4-8, 2015 in Philadelphia.

In keeping with the conference theme of “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” we welcome papers that explore the ways in which crossing ideological, political, economic, intellectual, and creative boundaries are elaborated in women’s travel experiences and travel texts. Because the word “limen” suggests crossing thresholds, an inherent aspect of geographic movement, our panel seeks to investigate how the various mobilities of geography, politics, and identity meet and intersect in women’s travel writing.

Please email a brief CV and 300 word abstract to Melanie Scriptunas (mscript@udel.edu) and Susan Roberson (susan.roberson@tamuk.edu) by 15 December 2014 using “SATW at SSAWW” as the subject line.

 


CFP: Ethnic American Women and Illustrated Periodicals (December 5, 2014)

The Research Society for American Periodicals invites submissions for a conference session of the Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW), November 4-8, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In keeping with the conference theme “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” the panel considers periodicals as the “liminal” or threshold sites of engagement between ethnic American cultural producers and their audiences. Papers may especially focus on how the hybridized forms of illustrated periodicals, as both visual and textual forms, enable self-expression for African American, Asian and Pacific American, Latina, and Native American women as authors and artists.

Possible topics may include:

  • -the dual or “hybrid lives” of ethnic American women as writers and visual artists in periodicals
  • -collaborations between periodical editors or authors and visual artists
  • -women cartoonists, illustrators, photographers and graphic designers
  • -the relationship between text and image in ethnic American magazines, newspapers, and newsletters
  • -women of color as art critics in American periodical culture

Papers may address any US historical era. Please submit a 300-word abstract and a 1- to 2-page c.v. by December 5, 2014 to Andreá Williams (Ohio State University) at andrea.williams.osu@gmail.com. Please use the subject line “RSAP/SSAWW proposal.” 


CFP: Indigenous Influence and Perspective in Mourning Dove’s Cogewea, the Half-Blood: A Depiction of the Great Montana Range (Deadline 12.15.14)

Mourning Dove’s novel Cogewea has been recognized for its foregrounding of a cast of liminal characters who straddle Native and non-Native cultures and spaces. Scholars have also drawn attention to the novel’s hybridized form with its celebration of indigenous oral traditions and its engagement and subversion of the familiar tropes of the western romance and sentimental novel. This panel would like to further explore indigenous influences and perspectives within the novel or Mourning Dove’s other writings, and welcomes a wide range of approaches to her work.

Email 250 word abstracts and a brief bio or CV to Amber LaPiana at aa.lapiana@gmail.com by December 15, 2014.


CFP: Rhyme as Liminal Space in Nineteenth Century Poetry (Deadline: Jan. 1, 2015)

Nineteenth century poetry is overwhelmingly driven by its rhymes, yet it is also overwhelmingly maligned for them. Very often, the kinds of rhymes in these poems are viewed as rigid, stultifying, predictable, or old-fashioned—as “mere jingling,” not worthy of much serious attention. Poet A.E. Stallings, however, writing in 2009, describes rhyme of any kind as a liminal space where something mysterious and transformative happens between words: “Rhyme is an irrational, sensual link between two words. It is chemical. It is alchemical.” Using Stallings’s definition as point of departure, this panel welcomes papers on any aspect of rhyme in poetry by nineteenth century American women, including (but not limited to) the following:

  • True rhyme
  • Slant rhyme
  • Eye rhyme
  • Stock rhyme, expected rhyme, “bad” rhyme
  • Rhyme in political poetry
  • Rhyme and genre
  • Rhyme and form
  • Rhyme and performance
  • Rhyme and humor
  • Rhyme and emotion
  • Rhyme and inversion
  • “Feminine” rhymes

Please send an abstract (300-500 words) and a brief bio to Melissa Range at melissa.h.range@lawrence.edu by January 1, 2015.


 CFP for SSAWW Conference 2015: Defining and Defying Boundaries in Nineteenth- and Twentieth Century Regional Literature (11.14.14)

For SSAWW’s forthcoming 2015 conference on “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” we are assembling a panel focused on contested boundaries of race, class, and sexuality in women’s nineteenth- and twentieth-century regional literature. Current papers for the session focus on contested gender roles in the work of New England authors Sarah Orne Jewett and Mary Wilkins Freeman, depictions of contested racial and regional identities in the work of antebellum antislavery novelist Mattie Griffith, and representations of the rural in the late twentieth century queer press.  Please submit any queries and 250 word abstracts to Myrto Drizou (mdrizou@valdosta.edu) and Holly Kent (hkent3@uis.edu) by Friday, November 14th.


The Harriet Beecher Stowe Society invites participants for its upcoming panel at the SSAWW 2015 Conference: (January 5, 2015)

Between Feeling Unsettled and Feeling Right:  Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Targeted Liminality
CFP for Society for the Study of American Women Writers, Philadelphia, PA, November 4-8, 2015

Sponsored by the Harriet Beecher Stowe Society
In The American Porch:  An Informal History of an Informal Place, Michael Dolan asserts that Harriet Beecher Stowe’s “Uncle Tom’s Cabin served its purpose, namely to heighten certain contradictions inherent in American life.”   He points out that many of the novel’s key scenes of emotional potency take place outside of the domestic confines of a home and on a porch, “positioning that ordinary liminal space as a site of enormous transformation.” Thus, Stowe’s novel can be seen as one that self-consciously worked to disrupt the binaries that defined antebellum America.  Under Stowe’s scrutiny, binaries such as race, politics, gender, and even public and private space were used to pique and incite a nineteenth-century audience’s oft conflicted emotions so as to help them to “feel right.”

Keeping with the SSAWW 2015 theme, “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” the Harriet Beecher Stowe Society invites papers that explore Stowe’s self-conscious application of liminality throughout her writing career.  Possible topics include:
•         Stowe’s treatment of mixed-race characters and/or passing
•         Protestantism versus Catholicism
•         sentiment versus rationality
•         constructions of public and private space
•         constructions of public and private life
•         constructions of gender
•         transatlanticism and/or transcontinentalism

Please send abstracts (250-500 words) and a brief bio to LuElla D’Amico (ldamico@whitworth.edu<mailto:ldamico@whitworth.edu>) by January 5, 2015.  While you do not need to be a SSAWW member to apply for a panel, presenters must be or become SSAWW members to participate in the conference, in addition to being members of the Stowe Society.


SSAWW 2015 Panel CFP: Rebecca Harding Davis and her World (Deadline 1.15.15)

The Society for the Study of Rebecca Harding Davis and her World will organize a session at the triennial meeting of the Society for the Study of American Women Writers to be in held November 4-8, 2015 in Philadelphia.

In keeping with the conference theme of “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” we are particularly interested in papers that explore issues of liminality and hybridity in the work of Davis and her contemporaries. The SSAWW CFP suggests a range of topics including: Alienation and/or disillusionment as states of in-betweeness; Borders and peripheries; Boundaries between/within the built environment and/or the natural environment; Child, adult and blurring boundaries; In between public and private or the semi-private, the semi-public; Historical constructions of space, place, home; Liminal spaces in the home; Immigration and/or citizenship; Inside and outside—the academy, the canon, etc.; The mainstream and/or the subversive; The margin and/or the center; Obscurity and celebrity; Pressures of normalization; Transatlantic; and Transgressions. See http://ssawwnew.wordpress.com/2015-conference/ssaww-2015-call-for-papers-deadline-2-13-15/ for more information. We are especially interested in papers that explore Davis’s lesser-known work.

Presentations will be limited to 15-20 minutes to accommodate 3 or 4 presenters.

Presenters must be members of the Society for the Study of Rebecca Harding Davis and Her World.  For information about joining the society, please visit our website at http://scotus.francis.edu/rebeccahardingdavis/

Deadline: January 15, 2015

Please submit a 250 word abstract and brief biographical sketch or CV to Mischa Renfroe at mischa.renfroe@mtsu.edu and Sharon Harris (Sharon.harris@uconn.edu )

 


SSAWW 2015 Panel CFP: Doing Recovery in the 21st Century: A Legacy Features Panel (Deadline 11.15.14)

Doing Recovery in the 21st Century: A Legacy Features Panel (Deadline 11.15.14)

This panel honors the role of Legacy Features—including Profiles, Reprints, and From the Archives—as a key venue for publishing recovery projects on American women writers.

What does recovery look like in the 21st century, when many of the traditional routes for publicizing recovery research are no longer readily available? Why do academics remain committed to recovery, particularly for the study of American women writers? What innovative strategies are necessary to make recovery academically relevant and professionally valued? What obstacles remain? How have previous recovery efforts shaped our approach to American women’s writing today?

Some potential topics include:

  • Biography as recovery
  • Teaching recovery methods
  • Teaching recovered materials
  • Recovery in the digital age
  • The limits of recovery
  • The politics of recovery
  • Failed recovery and its lessons
  • Collaborative recovery
  • Recovery and the profession
  • The legacy of early recovery research

Preference will be given to papers that present specific recovery projects as case studies, in addition to addressing larger critical questions about recovery scholarship and methods.

Please submit a short abstract (250-300 words) and biography (60 words) to Desirée Henderson at dhenderson@uta.edu by November 15, 2014.

This Legacy-sponsored panel is guaranteed to appear on the conference program.  Presentations may be considered for publication as Legacy Features.


Kay Boyle Society (Deadline 1.9.15)

Kay Boyle Society at Society for the Study of American Women Writers, Philadelphia, PA, November 4-8, 2015

In accordance with the SSAWW shared theme of Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives, we invite papers that engage Kay Boyle’s short fiction from any perspective. In particular, we encourage critical or pedagogical treatments of her short fiction that explore Boyle’s propensity to illuminate boundaries, crossings, and the subversive. Boyle’s short stories provide rich sites to interrogate transgression and marginality.

Paper proposals and CVs should be sent by January 9th to Anne Reynes-Delobel and Caroline Maun,anne.reynes@univ-amu.fr and caroline.maun@wayne.edu.


Women and Work (Deadline 1.5.15)

The meaning of “women’s work” has never been stable. While women have consistently engaged with the production of home as well as labor outside the home, their involvement in what Marx conceptualizes as wage-to-labor power exchange did not achieve heightened visibility in U.S. cultures until the nineteenth century. “Women and Work” seeks to explore the many ways that women have offered their labor in service of their families, their communities and their nations and how this labor constructs a variety of liminal experiences. How does women’s labor provide opportunities for collective dissent regarding the ethics of labor practices as well as the continued undervaluation of women’s work? How do women of color and immigrant women, systematically relegated to liminal spaces, organize to instigate change?  What liminal spaces do women occupy as they attempt to redefine the value of women’s work and negotiate new hybrid identities for themselves as workers, mothers, wives, community organizers, movement advocates? How do women navigate liminal and arguably risky spaces as they work to alter women’s complex relationships to the production of home, community and nation? How have women of color and gender nonconforming persons been disadvantaged by other more privileged women’s attempts to redefine work as well as secure political/social authenticity for this work and for themselves? Send 250-word proposal, CV, and 60-word bio by January 5 to leiren@aol.com AND strong01@nsuok.edu.


Bodies of Bondage: Environments in Women’s Neo-Captivity Narratives (Deadline 11.1.14)

With the conference theme in mind, this panel will consider the liminal spaces and hybrid lives of women in neo-captivity narratives, a term that addresses the broad implications of the captivities about which women write in the 20th and 21st centuries. From early captivity narratives to sentimental novels of seduction and the slave narratives made popular around the Civil War to contemporary neo-slave narratives, women write and narrate stories of captivity that prominently feature their bodies and the various violences and bondages visited upon them, the manner in which they are pursued, controlled, and patrolled, and the possibility for redemption, bodily or otherwise. But another salient feature of these narratives is the how the body and its attendant discursive possibilities “fits” within certain environments and how that fit-ness (or unfit-ness) is made manifest in the lived reality—before, during, and after capture—of the captive woman. Therefore, this panel’s focus is on the captive body of the woman and how that body: interacts with its environments, crosses and re-crosses boundaries between self/other, human/other-than-human, “inside”/”outside”, public/private; experiences differing environmental conditions and sociopolitical forces before, during, or after captivity; pursues practices of liberation from captivities; negotiates societal expectations for women or the pressures attached to normativity; engages in family- and community-building; and pursues liberatory practices, becomes empowered and resourceful, and achieves courage and strength within oppressive environments.

“Captivity” and “environment” can be interpreted broadly, but some approaches you might want to consider include: works by incarcerated women or kidnapped women; the body in critical race theory, material feminism, environmental health/justice movements, or disability studies; writings by lesbian, queer, and/or transgender women; postcolonial or transnational approaches to the body; or representations of women’s bodies in science and speculative fiction.

Please send a PDF file with an abstract (300-500 words) and brief bio by November 1, 2014 to Jill E. Anderson (andersonwires@gmail.com). NOTE: While you do not need to be a SSAWW member to apply for a panel, presenters must be or become SSAWW members to participate in the conference.


Lives Welded and Woven: Women Writers and American Arts & Crafts (Deadline: 11.1.14)

The 2015 Society for the Study of American Women Writers Conference (Philadelphia, PA, November 4-8, 2015)

Addressing the conference theme of “Liminal Spaces, Hybrid Lives,” this panel will explore the lives and work of women writers and activists whose socio-political vision found expression both in prose and the plastic arts. At the turn of the century, several important female-centered Arts & Crafts communities formed in Deerfield, MA; Chicago; and New York; in addition to smaller communities throughout the country. We welcome papers that focus on well-known figures in this movement such as Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr as well as lesser-known figures like Madeline Yale Wynne and Gertrude Christian Fosdick (among many others). How did this largely female-centered American movement depart from its roots in Ruskinian thought? What is the relationship between the social programs, fiction, non-fiction, and works of plastic art the movement produced? What insights does the context of the movement bring to bear on contemporaneous literature? Proposals might also consider the legacy of Arts & Crafts feminism; the role of craft magazines; or the work of American women writers from any period who simultaneously produced a significant body of work in ceramics, weaving, metalsmithing, etc.

Email proposals to Arielle Zibrak at azibrak@gmail.com by November 1 2014. Please include a 250-500 word abstract and a brief CV (no more than 2-pages) that includes rank/status (e.g. ABD or Associate Professor, etc.), institutional affiliation (independent scholars are welcome to submit proposals), publications, and conference presentations. All proposals should be both pasted into the text of the email and included as attachments (preferably as a single PDF document). While you do not need to be a SSAWW member to apply for a panel, presenters must be or become SSAWW members to participate in the conference.


1 Comment

  1. […] CFPs for Prospective SSAWW 2015 Panels […]

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